Latest News from Wyoming
  • News
  • Mead Says Legislative Committee Should Focus On Education

    A Wyoming legislative committee will decide if it wants to reconsider the powers and duties of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction this Friday. 

    State Superintendent Cindy Hill returned to lead the Department of Education this week, after the Wyoming Supreme Court ruled that a law stripping her ability to oversee the department was unconstitutional. 

    Governor Matt Mead says he doesn’t know what the legislative committee will try to do.

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  • DEQ Says Jurisdictional Issues Will Limit Their Rulemaking Authority Near Pinedale

    The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality is drafting rules to curb emissions near Pinedale, but the agency says there are some limitations to what they’ll be able to do.

    The Pinedale area violates federal air quality standards because of pollution from natural gas development. DEQ has already imposed stricter rules on new energy equipment, and now they plan to limit emissions from older, grandfathered facilities, as well. But spokesman Keith Guille says they aren't able to regulate everything.

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  • Rail Congestion Curbs Coal Shipments

    Arch Coal executives expressed frustration with the nation’s two biggest railroads during a conference call with investors Tuesday. Coal shipments out of the Powder River Basin have been delayed in recent months because of congestion on the BNSF and Union Pacific main lines. Arch Coal CEO John Eaves said it’s hurting the company’s earnings.

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  • Jackson Shuts Off Water Near Landslide

    Jackson is shutting off water today to homes and businesses on the north side of West Broadway as part of its ongoing response to the creeping hillside collapse on East Gros Ventre Butte.

    The plan is to install new valves and hydrants that will give the town the option of capping off a 12-inch water main, along the slide area, if that becomes necessary. Although the hillside is shifting slowly, it's creating forces that could burst both the water main and a nearby sewer line.

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