Technology
10:01 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Critics See 'Disaster' In Expansion Of Domain Names

mipan iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 3:28 am

Vast new tracts of the Internet are up for sale as of Thursday. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, known as ICANN, is forging ahead with plans to sell new domain categories despite some vocal opposition from regulators and advertisers.

Forget .com or .org — for a registration fee of $185,000, applicants can register a new suffix like .music, or perhaps a brand like .NPR. If you think of the Internet as virtual land, new continents are now on the block.

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News
5:46 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Wyoming DMV To Take Twice As Long

WYDOT

If you’re headed to the DMV for a new driver’s license, WYDOT recommends allowing extra time for your visit.

The federal Real-ID Act now requires states to verify more personal documents and to scan them before issuing a license. The measure is meant to prevent fraud and identity theft.

Don Edington works for WYDOT’s Driver Services program. He says renewing a license takes about 20 minutes –twice as long as it took before, and a new license can take more than 40 minutes.

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News
5:42 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Researches Study The Effect Of Wind Turbines On Wildlife

mywindpowersystem.com

Researchers at the University of Wyoming are trying to figure out how wind turbines affect antelope and elk. They’ve collared dozens of animals near the town of Medicine Bow and are tracking their movements over the course of several years.

Jeff Beck, who teaches ecosystem science and management, is overseeing the study. He says pronghorn tend to stay away from certain man-made structures … but wind farms are a relatively new phenomenon.

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News
5:39 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Emissions Data Blames Power Plants For Pollution

The most detailed data yet on emissions of heat-trapping gases show that U.S. power plants are responsible for the bulk of the pollution blamed for global warming. The data released today reveals that power plants released 72 percent of the greenhouse gases reported to the Environmental Protection Agency for 2010. Wyoming is among a handful of states that are home to high-polluting power plants, according to the data.

News
5:38 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Gov. Mead wraps up Texas trip

Governor Matt Mead is wrapping up a trip to Texas where he's been meeting with officials of some of the nation's largest energy companies to try to drum up support for the University of Wyoming's School of Energy Resources.

Renny MacKay is spokesman for Mead in Cheyenne. MacKay says Mead and UW officials have been in Houston and Dallas since Tuesday.

MacKay says they've been meeting with representatives from such energy firms as Exxon, Mobil and Marathon Oil Corp. He says Mead is due back in Wyoming on Wednesday afternoon.

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News
5:37 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Mountain lion killed in Gillette

A mountain lion spotted in a Gillette neighborhood has been killed.

Wyoming Game and Fish officials say the 2-year-old female cat was shot Tuesday to protect the public.

Some people reported seeing the cat on Monday but officers weren't able to find where it was living until the following day.

Game warden Irah Leonetti said the cat was living under a trailer in an area just east of an industrial park and had been feeding on some deer.

The last time he can remember a mountain lion being shot in the city was in 2008.

The Salt
4:09 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Did Food Safety Auditors Cause The Fatal Outbreak From Tainted Cantaloupes?

Melons were left to rot in the field at Jensen Farms after it was identified as the source of a fatal listeria outbreak.
Ed Andrieski ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 11:02 am

Private auditors paid to review food safety at the Colorado cantaloupe packer responsible for last summer's massive outbreak gave the facility rave reviews just before contaminated melons were shipped, which killed 30 people.

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NPR Story
3:49 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Science Desk Experiments With Twinkies

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 3:49 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You can buy Twinkies on the cheap right now. Safeway, just around the corner from our office here in Washington, has them on sale - two boxes for five bucks. So the NPR Science Desk was inspired to take part in the fine, long-standing tradition of experimenting with Twinkies.

NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on their findings.

ALLISON AUBREY, BYLINE: My colleagues, Julie Rovner, our health policy correspondent, and Adam Cole, a new addition to our team, had one idea.

So, what is your experiment, guys?

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Justice Department's No. 3 Stepping Down

Outgoing Associate Attorney General Tom Perrelli.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 3:53 pm

Associate Attorney General Tom Perrelli will leave the third highest-ranking post at the Justice Department in March after nearly three years managing a bustling portfolio that has run the gamut from mortgage abuses and the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico to stamping out domestic violence in Indian country.

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National Security
3:44 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Can Iran Close The World's Most Important Oil Route?

A member of Iran's navy participates in a drill on Dec. 28, 2011, in the Sea of Oman. Tehran is threatening to close the strategic Strait of Hormuz at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, in retaliation for new sanctions by the West.
Ali Mohammadi AP

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 8:24 pm

As tensions rise between Iran and the West, Tehran has threatened to block the Strait of Hormuz, a transit route for one-fifth of the world's oil. Is it more than an empty threat?

"The simple answer is: Yes, they can block it," Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said on CBS's Face the Nation on Jan. 8.

"They've invested in capabilities that for a short period of time block the Strait of Hormuz," he said.

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