Planet Money
10:01 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

The History Of Factory Jobs In America, In One Town

A shuttered cotton mill in Greenville County, South Carolina
scmikeburton Flickr

For more, see Adam Davidson's cover story in this month's issue of The Atlantic.

Greenville County, South Carolina is where manufacturing's past and future live side by side. This is not a metaphor; it's a visible fact. In South Carolina, and throughout America, factories produce more than ever. Yet in Greenville, there are abandoned textile mills everywhere you look.

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Economy
10:01 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Project's Promise Of Jobs Has Appalachia Seeing Stars

Visitors view a photo montage of Royal Dutch Shell's Ethylene Cracker Complex during its opening ceremony in Singapore in 2010. The company is expected to announce plans soon for an ethylene cracker plant in Ohio, Pennsylvania or West Virginia.
Munshi Ahmed Bloomberg

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 1:42 pm

Ever since the collapse of the domestic steel industry, blue-collar workers living in the mountain towns near the border of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio have struggled to find jobs.

But last June, Shell Oil Co. announced it would build a huge petrochemical refinery somewhere in that Appalachian region. The plant, known in the industry as a "cracker," could bring billions of investment dollars and thousands of jobs.

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World
10:01 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

In Russia, Modern 'Revolution' Comes At Its Own Pace

The Russian village of Sagra has been in the headlines since last summer, when residents — including 56-year-old Viktor Gorodilov (shown here) — successfully fought off an armed criminal gang that they say threatened their community. For many Russians, Sagra has become a symbol of how they say the government has let them down.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:08 am

Russia had one of the world's most famous revolutions nearly a century ago, in 1917. Yet for centuries, the country has seemed to prefer strong leaders who promised stability rather than revolutionary change. On a trip across Russia today on the Trans-Siberian railroad, NPR's David Greene found many Russians who expressed disappointment with their current government. But most said they wanted changes to be gradual, and were not looking for a major upheaval.

Second of three parts

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It's All Politics
10:01 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Some At RNC Meeting Say It's Romney's Race To Lose

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney greets supporters during a campaign rally in Columbia, S.C., on Wednesday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:39 am

The annual winter meeting of the Republican National Committee got under way in New Orleans on Wednesday, just hours after Mitt Romney won New Hampshire's Republican presidential primary.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Gingrich, Romney Go At It Over Abortion

Technology
10:01 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Critics See 'Disaster' In Expansion Of Domain Names

mipan iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 3:28 am

Vast new tracts of the Internet are up for sale as of Thursday. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, known as ICANN, is forging ahead with plans to sell new domain categories despite some vocal opposition from regulators and advertisers.

Forget .com or .org — for a registration fee of $185,000, applicants can register a new suffix like .music, or perhaps a brand like .NPR. If you think of the Internet as virtual land, new continents are now on the block.

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News
5:46 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Wyoming DMV To Take Twice As Long

WYDOT

If you’re headed to the DMV for a new driver’s license, WYDOT recommends allowing extra time for your visit.

The federal Real-ID Act now requires states to verify more personal documents and to scan them before issuing a license. The measure is meant to prevent fraud and identity theft.

Don Edington works for WYDOT’s Driver Services program. He says renewing a license takes about 20 minutes –twice as long as it took before, and a new license can take more than 40 minutes.

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News
5:42 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Researches Study The Effect Of Wind Turbines On Wildlife

mywindpowersystem.com

Researchers at the University of Wyoming are trying to figure out how wind turbines affect antelope and elk. They’ve collared dozens of animals near the town of Medicine Bow and are tracking their movements over the course of several years.

Jeff Beck, who teaches ecosystem science and management, is overseeing the study. He says pronghorn tend to stay away from certain man-made structures … but wind farms are a relatively new phenomenon.

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News
5:39 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Emissions Data Blames Power Plants For Pollution

The most detailed data yet on emissions of heat-trapping gases show that U.S. power plants are responsible for the bulk of the pollution blamed for global warming. The data released today reveals that power plants released 72 percent of the greenhouse gases reported to the Environmental Protection Agency for 2010. Wyoming is among a handful of states that are home to high-polluting power plants, according to the data.

News
5:38 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Gov. Mead wraps up Texas trip

Governor Matt Mead is wrapping up a trip to Texas where he's been meeting with officials of some of the nation's largest energy companies to try to drum up support for the University of Wyoming's School of Energy Resources.

Renny MacKay is spokesman for Mead in Cheyenne. MacKay says Mead and UW officials have been in Houston and Dallas since Tuesday.

MacKay says they've been meeting with representatives from such energy firms as Exxon, Mobil and Marathon Oil Corp. He says Mead is due back in Wyoming on Wednesday afternoon.

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