Music News
1:36 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

New Liturgy Reanimates Catholic Music

Members of the St. Agnes Catholic Church choir sing during Sunday Mass. From left to right: Donald Hukle, Ray Valido, Richard Samp, Jack Grace and Ben Robles.
Peter Maher Courtesy of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 3:17 pm

When Catholics arrive at church for the beginning of Advent this weekend, they may find themselves stumbling over not only the words, but also the music. The Vatican has changed the English-speaking Mass to make it more faithful to the Latin — and as a result, the sung portions of the Mass often don't work.

It's the most dramatic change in more than 40 years, and it has Mike McMahon working overtime with his choir.

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

'Flash Robs' Worry Retailers

A new kind of shoplifting has hit stores in Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. "Flash robs" occur when a group of people organized over social media steal by mobbing a store. Police are advising store employees not to try and stop the robbers, and to take steps to make the quick removal of items difficult.

Europe
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

For Greeks, A Sad Shift In Self Image

There was a time when Greeks were proud of being Greek, of being a people known for dancing, being happy without material wealth, enjoying life. Now, Greeks are known for being deeply in debt, accused by some of living the high life on other people's money, of dragging Europe's economy to the brink of disaster.

Europe
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Germany's Identity Cemented In The Euro

When the euro was rolled out nearly a decade ago, it was touted as a unifying force across European cultures. Uwe Boek, a 48-year-old Berliner, has seen and embraced these changes: "It's us being Europeans in the European Union. Because the euro is money but the European Union is about identity."

Research News
1:00 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Why We Give, Not Why You Think

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 3:16 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

This time of year, pleas for donations are as plentiful as eggnog and door-buster sales. Americans give around $300 billion a year to charity. And as NPR's Alix Spiegel reports, psychologists have started to look more closely at when and why we're motivated to give.

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News
11:09 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Planning for Growth and Small-Town Character

Preserving wildlife is a top goal in Teton County's new plan for managing future development. But some local residents say planning for people also needs to be part of the deal.

Robbin Levy lives just down the street from Wilson Elementary School -- a distance her two kids could easily walk or bike. But before she goes to work, Levy drives them to school because it's too dangerous for them to cross Highway 22.

"School's right across the street," says Levy. "But it feels like it's miles away."

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News
11:06 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Forest Service Proposes New Planning Rule

TheU.S. Forest Service has proposed a new national planning rule, which would govern how individual forests around the country draw up land management plans.

Under the current rule, forests draw up new management plans every 15 years. With the new system, they would re-assess and tweak their plans on an ongoing basis.

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News
11:03 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Food Bank Demand Still High

The Wyoming Food Bank of the Rockies is on track to deliver roughly five million pounds of food to individual food pantries throughout the state this year. But a new report from Feeding America suggests there’s still unmet demand, and that the food bank should be sending out twice as much food. Jamie Purcell is the development manager for Food Bank of the Rockies, which serves 260 local agencies throughout Wyoming, and says that right now the food bank is running at full capacity.

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News
9:37 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Have The Crackdowns On Immigration Gone Too Far?

Protesters march outside the Alabama Capitol during a demonstration against the state's immigration law in Montgomery, Ala., on Nov. 15.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 2:29 pm

The architect of Arizona's controversial immigration law has been voted out of office. That law and similar statutes are undergoing difficult court challenges. And the strictest law, in Alabama, has ignited a withering backlash expected to force major changes.

Have the crackdowns on illegal immigration finally gone too far?

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Milo Miles is Fresh Air's world-music and American-roots music critic. He is a former music editor of The Boston Phoenix.

Miles is a contributing writer for Rolling Stone magazine, and he also writes about music for The Village Voice and The New York Times.

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