Shots - Health Blog
8:46 am
Fri October 21, 2011

Biggest Study Yet Finds No Cancer Risk From Cellphones

The latest study to look at cellphone safety found no increased risk of brain cancer.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Danish epidemiologists have some real advantages.

Citizens of the Scandinavian nation gets a unique ID number for life that can be used by researchers to pull together health records, including data from cancer registries, for just about anybody in the country.

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
8:30 am
Fri October 21, 2011

In Miami, School Aims For 'Bi-Literate' Education

At Coral Way Elementary School in Miami-Dade County, students take classes in Spanish in the morning, then switch to English in the afternoon.

Claudio Sanchez NPR

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 10:00 am

In the fall of 1963, in the throes of the Cold War, Coral Way Elementary took in the children of political refugees fleeing Fidel Castro's Cuba. The goal was not just to teach them English, but to make sure they remained fluent in Spanish and held on to their culture. Cuban-Americans thrived in Miami, and so did Coral Way's bilingual immersion model.

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Fri October 21, 2011

'Steve Jobs' Book Reveals Delay In Cancer Surgery; Vow To Destroy Android

For his upcoming biography of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson conducted more than 40 interviews with the enigmatic tech leader.

With a book about Steve Jobs' life set to hit real and virtual shelves soon, his official biographer, Walter Isaacson, is appearing on 60 Minutes this Sunday. And as often happens in these cases, portions of the book have hit the web a little ahead of its Oct. 24 publish date.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Fri October 21, 2011

Kinsler Steals Second, And Rangers Take Game 2 In St. Louis

The second game of the World Series came down to the ninth inning Thursday night, as the Texas Rangers used a string of base hits, sacrifices and a stolen base to beat the St. Louis Cardinals, 2-1. It was the second tight game of the series, which is now tied, 1-1.

NPR's Tom Goldman calls Ian Kinsler's steal of second in the ninth inning "a key moment" in the win. At that point in the game, the Rangers were down 1-0. But then Kinsler reached first base, on a bloop single to shallow left field. And he was determined to make it to second base.

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The Two-Way
6:27 am
Fri October 21, 2011

Top Stories: Questions In Libya; Rangers Win; Jobs Bill Blocked

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 6:29 am

Good Morning.

Here's a roundup of the top news stories so far today:

One day after Moammar Gadhafi's death, Libya is celebrating. But questions persist over exactly how he died — and how to bury him.

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Africa
6:05 am
Fri October 21, 2011

U.S. Steers Clear Of Nation-Building In Libya

The U.S. chose to play a limited role in the uprising against Moammar Gadhafi, shown here delivering a speech at the United Nations in 2009. He was killed in Sirte, Libya, on Thursday.

Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 11:05 am

The United States military has intervened and helped topple three autocratic leaders over the past decade, yet it remains far from clear whether any of these countries will be successful in the years to come.

Iraq and Afghanistan are still struggling to find stable footing years after U.S. invasions drove out Saddam Hussein and Mullah Omar.

The death of Moammar Gadhafi on Thursday removes him as a force that could undermine the new, interim Libyan leadership. But the country still faces many obstacles to building a stable, prosperous and democratic future.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Fri October 21, 2011

Gadhafi's Funeral Delayed; Questions Persist On Final Moments

In Sirte, fighters loyal to the new government celebrate after the town's defenses finally fell, and former leader Moammar Gadhafi was killed.

Philippe Desmazes AFP/Getty Images

The funeral for former Libyan ruler Moammar Gadhafi was to have taken place Friday, in keeping with Islamic tradition that bodies be buried as soon as possible. But a host of concerns have caused the body to be placed in temporary storage instead — and an inquiry may be launched into how he died.

The dictator was found and killed in his hometown of Sirte Thursday, after eight months of unrest and violence in Libya.

Here are some of the open questions concerning Libya:

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Africa
5:17 am
Fri October 21, 2011

Uganda Mission Part Of Military's Wide Reach

The leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, Joseph Kony, is shown in 2006. He has fought against the Ugandan government for years. The U.S. is now sending 100 military advisers to central Africa to help regional armies fight against Kony's movement.

Stuart Price AP

President Obama's decision to send 100 U.S. troops into central Africa to help combat a rebel group may have struck many as a surprise, but there's a long precedent for such operations.

U.S. forces have worked collaboratively with numerous militaries around the globe in recent decades, whether to put down insurgencies in places like the Philippines and El Salvador, or to fight the drug trade in Colombia and Mexico.

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National Security
10:01 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

Does Libya Offer Clues To An Obama Doctrine?

President Obama speaks in the White House Rose Garden to discuss the death of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 6:08 am

President Obama said Moammar Gadhafi's death marks the end of a long and painful chapter for the Libyan people. The seven-month military campaign that toppled the Libyan leader also marks a high point for the kind of international cooperation that Obama has championed.

The White House was careful Thursday not to claim vindication for the president's policies, but the Libyan exercise does offer an example of what an "Obama Doctrine" might look like.

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Economy
10:01 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

School Debt A Long-Term Burden For Many Graduates

Students attend graduation ceremonies at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Two-thirds of college students now graduate with debt, owing an average amount of $24,000.

Butch Dill AP

With the nation's student-loan debt climbing toward $1 trillion, it's taking many young people longer than ever to pay off their loans. Two-thirds of college students now graduate with debt, owing an average of $24,000. But some borrow far more and find this debt influencing major life decisions long after graduation.

"I was very naive, and I realize that now," says Stephanie Iachini, of Altoona, Pa. She was the first in her family to go to college and financed it herself. "Basically I was just signing papers because the education part meant a lot to me."

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