David Bianculli is a guest host and TV critic on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross. A contributor to the show since its inception, he has been a TV critic since 1975.

From 1993 to 2007, Bianculli was a TV critic for the New York Daily News.

Bianculli has written three books: Dangerously Funny: The Uncensored Story of 'The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour (Simon & Schuster/Touchstone, 2009),  Teleliteracy: Taking Television Seriously (1992), and Dictionary of Teleliteracy (1996).

An associate professor of TV and film at Rowan University in New Jersey, Bianculli is also the founder and editor of the online magazine, TVWorthWatching.com.

The Salt
7:36 am
Mon October 10, 2011

In Peru, A Hunt For Chocolate Like You've Never Tasted It

Farmers dry cacao beans in Uchiza, Peru, a file photo from 2008. Researchers are exploring the wild cacao bounty of Peru's Amazon Basin, part of an effort to jump-start the country's premium cacao industry.

Martin Mejia AP

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 11:05 am

Christopher Columbus first encountered the cacao bean on his final voyage to the New World some 500 years ago. It took a while for Europeans to embrace the taste — one 16th-century Spanish missionary called the chocolate that indigenous people drank "loathsome."

But by the 17th century, chocolate met sugar, and it became a hit the world over — it's now a $93 billion a year global industry, according to market research firm Mintel.

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Middle East
7:32 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Clashes Spark Outrage Among Egypt's Christians

Egyptians grieve over the coffins of Coptic Christians killed during Sunday's clashes with Egyptian security forces, before beginning a funeral procession from the Coptic Hospital in Cairo.

Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Several hundred Christians pelted police with rocks outside a Cairo hospital Monday, in fresh clashes one day after more than two dozen people died in riots that grew out of a Christian protest against a church attack. Sunday's sectarian violence was the worst in Egypt since the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak in February.

Security officials said Monday that the death toll from Sunday night's clashes rose to 26 from 24, after two people died of their wounds.

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Economy
5:10 am
Mon October 10, 2011

U.S. Economists Sargent, Sims Win 2011 Nobel Prize

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 3:04 pm

Americans Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics.

In awarding the $1.5 million prize, with the formal title the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited the researchers "for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy."

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Interactive: How Latinos Are Reshaping Communities

NPR

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 11:21 am

Over the past decade, the story of population growth in the United States was defined largely by the story of Latinos emerging as the nation's largest minority.

They surpassed African-Americans for that distinction, by accounting for 56 percent of America's growth from 2000 to 2010. They now number more than 50 million. Put another way, 1 in every 6 U.S. residents is Latino.

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

West Liberty Is Nation's First Majority Hispanic Town

Jose Zacarias lives in an old farmhouse flanked by corn and soybean fields near the edge of town. The Mexican-born immigrant came to West Liberty more than 25 years ago.

Benjamin Roberts

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 1:42 pm

(This report is part of the Morning Edition series "2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.," looking at the ways Latinos are changing — and being changed — by the U.S.)

One place the Hispanic population is growing is in the overwhelmingly white state of Iowa. The latest census figures show the Hispanic population, while only 5 percent of the state, has almost doubled since 2000.

And one small town — West Liberty — is the first in Iowa to have a majority Hispanic population.

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Asia
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

In China's Red-Hot Art Market, Fraud Abounds

These two paintings were up for auction in Hong Kong in February. Art auctions produce eye-popping sales figures in China, though critics say there is a widespread problem with fakes.

Vincent Yu AP

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 10:22 am

As the global economy teeters, one market is still reaching stratospheric highs: Chinese art.

A Hong Kong auction of fine Chinese paintings earlier this month raised $94.8 million, three times pre-sale estimates. In fact, China is now the world's biggest art market, according to the art information agency Artprice.

Yet all is not what it seems in the murky world of Chinese art auctions, including a painting that sold last year for more than $11 million, but appears not to be what was advertised.

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Business
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

A Single Hire Is A Big Deal To A Small Business

Rusty George Creative laid off more than half of its 17-person staff when clients stopped buying their marketing services as the economy crashed. After a hard look at finances, the small firm is now ready to hire a new employee.

Courtesy of Rusty George

In this economy, the decision to add even one person to the payroll is a huge leap of faith for a small company. One marketing firm in Tacoma, Wash., has done the math — down to the additional cups of coffee they'd need to make for a new employee — and is ready to hire.

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Your Health
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Mental First Aid: How To Help In An Emotional Crisis

Nikki Perez wanted to learn how to help others in crisis after recovering from her own mental health disorder.

Kelley Weiss for NPR

When Nikki Perez was in her 20s, she had a job as a lab tech at a hospital in Sacramento, Calif. She said everything was going well until one day, when something changed.

"I worked in a very sterile environment, and so part of the procedure was to wash your hands," she said. "I found myself washing my hands more and more, to the point where they were raw, and sometimes they would bleed."

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U.S.
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Opposition Remains As Key Vote On Jobs Bill Nears

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President Obama holds up a copy of his jobs bill as he speaks at Eastfield College in Mesquite, Texas. Obama is challenging a divided Congress to unite behind the bill or get ready to be run "out of town" by angry voters.

Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 2:55 pm

It's been nearly two weeks since President Obama urged a crowd of supporters in Denver to turn up the heat on lawmakers in Washington to pass his $447 billion jobs bill. So far on Capitol Hill, it's gone nowhere.

That could change Tuesday when the Senate holds a vote on taking up the legislation. But fierce Republican opposition both to the bill and how it's paid for leaves slim prospects of it going any further.

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