World
1:00 pm
Mon October 10, 2011

In Egypt, Grief Among Coptic Christians Turns To Rage

Christians protest outside St. Mark's Cathedral in Cairo, a day after 25 people, mostly Christians, died in clashes with Egyptian security forces.

Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Ormany Makary's coffin teetered precariously as throngs of mourners carried the 25-year-old truck driver's body to the front of Abbasiya Cathedral, chanting "Raise up your head, you are Copts!"

But his fiancee, Saafa Gaber, couldn't.

Makary was among the 25 people killed in a night of clashes between mostly Coptic Christian protesters and Egyptian soldiers.

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Mon October 10, 2011

U.S. Firm Finds Shipwreck Thought To Hold Tons Of Silver

This image captured by a remote submersible shows a steel skylight on the SS Mantola's deck, above the ship's engine room. The wreck sits under 8,000 feet of water.

Odyssey Marine Exploration

More than 94 years after being sunk by a torpedo, a ship carrying tens of thousands of pounds of silver has been located by a marine salvage company. Odyssey Marine Exploration Inc. says it has found the SS Mantola, which came under attack by a German ship in 1917, as it sailed from London to Calcutta.

The wreck was found at a depth of around 8,000 feet, near the coast of Ireland. The ship's cargo was insured for 110,000 British pounds — a figure that has been used to deduce that the cargo contained nearly 19 tons of silver bars.

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Sports
10:07 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Woods Finishes 30th After Bizarre Hot Dog Incident

Tiger Woods, hits from the tee on the ninth hole on the final round of the Frys.com Open. Two holes earlier, his birdie putt attempt was interrupted by a man throwing a hot dog onto the green.

Robert Laberge Getty Images

The Frys.com Open brought the first PGA Tour win for Bryce Molder, who joined the tour in 2002. But the tournament was also memorable for Tiger Woods, who played well — and survived having a hot dog thrown at him on the putting green.

Molder holed a 12-foot birdie putt on the 18th that got him into a playoff with Briny Baird. Molder then outlasted Baird on the sixth extra hole, the longest playoff on tour this year, by making a 6-foot birdie putt.

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The Two-Way
8:58 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Netflix Kills Qwikster; Price Hike Lives On

Packages of DVDs await shipment at Netflix's headquarters in San Jose, Calif.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:20 am

Bowing to customers' anger and confusion over its move to divide its streaming and DVD video offerings, Netflix is reversing itself, snuffing the plan to offer DVDs by mail via a new service called "Qwikster." News of the backpedaling move was published on the company's blog early Monday.

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David Bianculli is a guest host and TV critic on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross. A contributor to the show since its inception, he has been a TV critic since 1975.

From 1993 to 2007, Bianculli was a TV critic for the New York Daily News.

Bianculli has written three books: Dangerously Funny: The Uncensored Story of 'The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour (Simon & Schuster/Touchstone, 2009),  Teleliteracy: Taking Television Seriously (1992), and Dictionary of Teleliteracy (1996).

An associate professor of TV and film at Rowan University in New Jersey, Bianculli is also the founder and editor of the online magazine, TVWorthWatching.com.

The Salt
7:36 am
Mon October 10, 2011

In Peru, A Hunt For Chocolate Like You've Never Tasted It

Farmers dry cacao beans in Uchiza, Peru, a file photo from 2008. Researchers are exploring the wild cacao bounty of Peru's Amazon Basin, part of an effort to jump-start the country's premium cacao industry.

Martin Mejia AP

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 11:05 am

Christopher Columbus first encountered the cacao bean on his final voyage to the New World some 500 years ago. It took a while for Europeans to embrace the taste — one 16th-century Spanish missionary called the chocolate that indigenous people drank "loathsome."

But by the 17th century, chocolate met sugar, and it became a hit the world over — it's now a $93 billion a year global industry, according to market research firm Mintel.

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Middle East
7:32 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Clashes Spark Outrage Among Egypt's Christians

Egyptians grieve over the coffins of Coptic Christians killed during Sunday's clashes with Egyptian security forces, before beginning a funeral procession from the Coptic Hospital in Cairo.

Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Several hundred Christians pelted police with rocks outside a Cairo hospital Monday, in fresh clashes one day after more than two dozen people died in riots that grew out of a Christian protest against a church attack. Sunday's sectarian violence was the worst in Egypt since the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak in February.

Security officials said Monday that the death toll from Sunday night's clashes rose to 26 from 24, after two people died of their wounds.

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Economy
5:10 am
Mon October 10, 2011

U.S. Economists Sargent, Sims Win 2011 Nobel Prize

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 3:04 pm

Americans Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics.

In awarding the $1.5 million prize, with the formal title the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited the researchers "for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy."

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Interactive: How Latinos Are Reshaping Communities

NPR

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 11:21 am

Over the past decade, the story of population growth in the United States was defined largely by the story of Latinos emerging as the nation's largest minority.

They surpassed African-Americans for that distinction, by accounting for 56 percent of America's growth from 2000 to 2010. They now number more than 50 million. Put another way, 1 in every 6 U.S. residents is Latino.

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
10:01 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

West Liberty Is Nation's First Majority Hispanic Town

Jose Zacarias lives in an old farmhouse flanked by corn and soybean fields near the edge of town. The Mexican-born immigrant came to West Liberty more than 25 years ago.

Benjamin Roberts

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 1:42 pm

(This report is part of the Morning Edition series "2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.," looking at the ways Latinos are changing — and being changed — by the U.S.)

One place the Hispanic population is growing is in the overwhelmingly white state of Iowa. The latest census figures show the Hispanic population, while only 5 percent of the state, has almost doubled since 2000.

And one small town — West Liberty — is the first in Iowa to have a majority Hispanic population.

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