Under Suspicion
10:03 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Shoppers Entangled In War On Terror

Mall of America officials say that thousands of mall visitors have been stopped and questioned in recent years. The interviews at the mall are part of a counterterrorism initiative that acts as the private eyes and ears of law enforcement authorities but has often ensnared innocent people, according to an investigation by NPR and the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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Under Suspicion
10:02 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Finding Meaning In Suspicious Activity Reports

At a fusion center in Las Vegas workers like Daniel Burns, a program coordinator, analyze suspicious activity reports.
Monica Lam Center for Investigative Reporting

The suspicious activity reports submitted by the Mall of America's security team frequently land at the Minnesota Joint Analysis Center, one of 72 "fusion centers" in the United States started with federal funding.

The reports are routed through various law enforcement and intelligence networks, often ending up in front of local analysts and the FBI.

Those networks include local police databases and state fusion centers that collect and disseminate homeland security intelligence, along with systems run by the FBI and other federal agencies.

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Under Suspicion
10:01 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Under Suspicion At The Mall Of America

The Mall of America, one of the nation's largest shopping and entertainment venues, is also home to its own counterterrorism unit.
Dawn Villela AP

Originally published on Thu September 8, 2011 8:42 am

Since Sept. 11, the nation's leaders have warned that government agencies like the CIA and the FBI can't protect the country on their own — private businesses and ordinary citizens have to look out for terrorists, too. So the Obama administration has been promoting programs like "See Something, Say Something" and the "Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative."

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World
10:00 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Mubarak Trial Resumes Amid 'Circus' Atmosphere

The trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resumes today following scuffles inside and outside the courtroom. Libyan officials loyal to Moammar Gadhafi reportedly fled to neighboring Niger. And Turkey announced it was "totally suspending" all trade, military and defense ties with Israel. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses the latest news in the Middle East and North Africa with Al Jazeera International's Abderrahim Foukara and NPR Foreign Correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.

The Two-Way
8:50 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Disbelief, Shock In Carson City After Shooting Rampage

Ralph Swagler was in his family's barbecue restaurant in Carson City, Nev., Tuesday morning when he heard gunshots outside and saw a man armed with what authorities say was an AK-47 walk into a nearby IHOP restaurant.

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World
8:19 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Jet Carrying Russian Hockey Team Crashes

A Russian jet carrying a top ice hockey team crashed while taking off Wednesday in western Russia, killing at least 36 people and leaving one critically injured, officials said.

The Russian Emergency Situations Ministry said the Yak-42 plane crashed as it was trying to take off from Yaroslavl airport, about 185 miles east of Moscow. It said one person survived the crash with grave injuries.

The weather was sunny and clear at the time.

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin immediately sent the nation's transport minister to the site, 10 miles east of Yaroslavl.

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Shots - Health Blog
7:53 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Despite Deficit, Enzi Supports Federal Spending On Autism

Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY) is expected to vote for a bill that would continue funding for autism research and treatment.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY) has been among the more outspoken members of Congress calling for major reductions in federal spending to reduce the budget deficit.

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Wed September 7, 2011

With Perry In Mix, Tonight's GOP Debate Is Highly Anticipated

Our friend Frank James over at It's All Politics will be watching the action, but we do want to at least take note of tonight's Republican presidential debate and pass along the coordinates in case you want to check it out.

A key story line, according to the conventional wisdom: How will the new "front runner," Texas Gov. Rick Perry, do in his first appearance with the other seven?

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The Two-Way
7:20 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Remembering Sept. 11: 'I Threw The Phone Down, I Screamed'

As the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks draws closer, we're pointing to some of the stories being told about that day and the days since.

Madeleine V. Leckie Elementary School in Washington, D.C., has a strong, painful connection to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, as NPR's Claudio Sanchez reported earlier on Morning Edition.

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U.S.
6:43 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Five Ways The Postal Service Could Reinvent Itself

U.S. Postal Service mail delivery trucks sit idle at the Manassas Post Office in Virginia on September 5.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

By the end of September, the U.S. Postal Service will be on the brink of defaulting on its employee pension obligations, unable to borrow more money and have just enough cash to cover operations for a week.

Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe issued the warning to a Senate committee on Tuesday as he pleaded with Congress to intervene before Sept. 30 by granting him unprecedented authority to make radical changes that could steer the agency from financial ruin. He said the Postal Service could report losses of up to $10 billion for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30.

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