Interviews
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

Interview With Former Secretary Of State Colin Powell

Nearly a decade after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell says that terrorists have been dealt a serious blow by the United States.

But he also cautions Americans not to worry so much about terrorism that "we start to lose the essence of who we are as an open, freedom-loving people, welcoming to the rest of the world."

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Science
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

An Ice Age Beast Evolved To Beat The Cold

An artist's reconstruction of the Tibetan woolly rhino. Woolly rhinos used their flattened horns to sweep snow off of vegetation, a critical adaptation to survive frigid conditions.
Image by Julie Naylor

The Tibetan Plateau is the world's highest place. It's four times the size of France and home to most of the world's highest mountains.

As you might expect, it's cold there. And it may be that the deep chill of the Tibetan Plateau played a role in the evolution of some of the world's most charismatic animals.

That's the belief of a scientist who discovered the skull of a woolly rhino on the Tibetan Plateau.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

In Afghanistan, Reviewing A Decade Of Promises

U.S. Marines patrol with Afghan forces through a harvested poppy field in Northern Marjah in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. Ten years after the fall of the Taliban, progress on U.S. pledges to help Afghanistan is mixed.
David Gilkey NPR/Redux

People living in Afghanistan 10 years ago had little electricity, few radios and almost no televisions to alert them of the Sept. 11 attacks in New York and Washington. The news didn't really reach across the country until the American bombing campaign and invasion began a month later. The fall of the Taliban regime at the end of 2001 and the flood of international aid raised hope in Afghanistan.

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Latin America
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

In Cuba, Women Often Prefer Thumbing A Ride

Cuba's capital, Havana, has good public safety and terrible public transportation. That has led to a curious form of travel, especially for young women in the city: urban hitchhiking.

At major intersections, women climb in and out of strangers' cars, commuting to work or running errands in a way that would be almost unthinkable in any other Latin American capital.

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Business
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

Surprising Areas See Growth In Green Jobs

When you think about Green Energy and its jobs, Albany, N.Y., probably wouldn't be the first city that pops into your head. But according to a report, the upstate New York region has the highest concentration of green jobs in the country. Another surprising area in the top 10: Cleveland and northeast Ohio.

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Economy
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

In Jobless Data, Devil May Be In Details

The Labor Department releases its reports on August unemployment on Friday. What economists are expecting is by now a familiar story: That August did not generate enough job growth to move the needle on the jobless rate. But the most intractable part of the jobless problem might be the one that doesn't show up in the numbers.

The unemployment rate is expected to tick up slightly to 9.2 percent. Two years ago, the unemployment rate was 9.5 percent.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

Georgia Jobs Program, Lauded By Obama, Has Critics

During his three-day bus tour, President Obama discussed job creation. At one town hall, he mentioned a training program in Georgia that allows companies to train prospective employees temporarily while they still receive an unemployment check.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

President Obama is scheduled next week to announce a new federal jobs plan that could include some kind of worker training program. Among those programs the president is considering is one in Georgia, which has had mixed reviews.

At a recent town hall meeting in Illinois, Obama answered questions about the sagging economy, and mentioned Georgia Works, a job-training program that allows a company to try out a prospective employee for eight weeks while the worker still receives an unemployment check. He called it a smart program.

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StoryCorps
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

A Father Reflects On Strength And Meeting His Match

Robert Stover, 83, with his daughter, Valerie Anderson, 56, in Howard, Pa.
StoryCorps

Robert Stover grew up in the late 1930s, and as he remembers, he never really had a hometown.

"My father was a salesman with the Hoover Vacuum Cleaner Company. He could move into a city and sell out its potential fairly rapidly. So I lived all over," Stover tells his daughter, Valerie Anderson.

Making friends wasn't easy.

"When I would get to a new town, everybody had to see who could whip the new boy," Robert says. "I was willing to stipulate that they all could — including the females. But it had to be proven."

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Economy
10:01 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

Democrats Urge Obama To 'Go Big' With Jobs Package

When a president asks for a prime-time slot to address a joint session of Congress, he is signaling to the country that he has something very important to say. Next Thursday President Obama will once again try to make a hard political pivot to the issue of jobs.

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well contamination
5:18 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

Groundwater contamination investivation continues

(credit: Environmental Protection Agency)

State regulators are still working to determine the extent of water contamination in the Fremont County town of Pavillion.

After determining that 41 wells have been contaminated either from gas development or local geology, officials have been trying to determine the integrity of area water wells, as well as whether there is contamination from drill pits. So far, studies have not yielded anything conclusive.

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