Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Think You're An Auditory Or Visual Learner? Scientists Say It's Unlikely

iStockphoto.com

We've all heard the theory that some students are visual learners, while others are auditory learners. And still other kids learn best when lessons involve movement.

But should teachers target instruction based on perceptions of students' strengths? Several psychologists say education could use some "evidence-based" teaching techniques, not unlike the way doctors try to use "evidence-based medicine."

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Crisis In The Housing Market
10:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

'Land Bank' Knocks Out Some Foreclosure Problems

LaMont Rump of Fez Enterprises guides an excavator during the demolition of a house in Cleveland.
Mhari Saito for NPR

Cities have been tearing down crumbling, vacant houses for decades. The money for municipal demolition bills usually comes out of city budgets, but in Cleveland the housing crisis has started to change that equation.

Bill Beavers has lived on Cleveland's Dove Street since 1967. But on a frecent sunny morning, Beavers is sitting on a neighbor's front porch, watching something he has never seen on his block before.

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Closing Walter Reed
10:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Where Generations Of Soldiers Healed, And Moved On

Tyson Quink exercises at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. Quink, a former college football player, lost both of his legs three months into his deployment to Afghanistan.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

On a recent morning, John Pierce walked across the sprawling hospital campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. On the lawn, he spotted people who have come to define the place in recent years.

"[They were] having physical fitness-type tests," Pierce says. "There were people with notebooks and things, like they record when you do your sit-ups and pushups — but these were a number of double amputees."

Pierce is the historian for the Walter Reed Society, which makes him an expert on the historic American hospital in Washington, D.C.

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Africa
3:33 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Farrow Draws Attention To Plight Of African Refugees

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 5:34 am

In the Horn of Africa, 12 million people are in need of food aid because of the drought. The people of Somalia, facing both famine and war, are some of the hardest hit.

Many of those fleeing Somalia seek refuge in the southwest, at Kenya's giant Dadaab refugee camp. The settlement is about 50 miles from Kenya's border with Somalia. There are almost half a million Somalis in the camp – with more arriving every day.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Irene Has Passed, But Damage Concerns Remain

Assessing Irene's impact from North Carolina to New England. Many local officials are relieved the damage wasn't worse, but power outages and flooding remain a concern for coming days. NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports on the storm's impact.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Residents Clean Up After Irene Drenches East Coast

This morning, when Tod Clissold walked into Poor Richard's, the bar he owns in Manteo, North Carolina, the first thing he noticed was the smell. Like a lot of East Coast residents, Clissold is in recovery mode after Hurricane Irene left homes and businesses flooded and powerless from North Carolina to Massachusetts. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with Clissold and several others, plus the latest from NPR's Jennifer Ludden, Joe Palca and Joel Rose in New York.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Riding Out The Storm At The Beach

On Friday night, Kevin Boyer was at Venter City Beach near Atlantic City with some buddies. They'd just bought a bunch of beer — Yuengling and Miller Lite. But when it looked like Hurricane Irene was going to be pretty serious, he decided to ride the storm out at home, with his parents, who live a block from the beach. They drank his dad's scotch, instead.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Why Wasn't Hurricane Irene Worse?

Within 48 hours, Hurricane Irene was downgraded from a Category 2 to a Category 1 to a Tropical Storm by the time it passed through New York City. City officials along the East Coast called for historic evaluations, and grocery and home improvement stores were stripped bare in some areas. People prepared for the worst, but the worst never came. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan and NPR's Joe Palca talk about why Irene didn't live up to it's billing of a storm that could have caused cataclysmic damage.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

NYC Escapes Worst As Irene Roars Through

With mass transit shut down and mass evacuations ordered, New York was braced for a "once-in-a-century" punch from Irene. But the impact was less than expected. NPR's Joel Rose reports from New York.

The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

VIDEO: How New York Experienced Irene

Historical wind.
National Hurricane Center

As we've been hearing all morning from government officials, Irene had the potential to be a devastating tropical cyclone. No doubt it did damage and it was certainly deadly, but this map from the National Hurricane Center gives you an idea of the wrath that stayed off shore. It also tells you that the Outer Banks of North Carolina were the hardest hit:

With that in mind, the AP has put together a series of videos that give you an idea of the kind of storm this was.

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