The Two-Way
3:29 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

Some New Yorkers Look On Irene's Bright Side

People stand in line at a Trader Joe's Wine Shop in Manhattan Friday, ahead of Hurricane Irene's arrival in New York City this weekend.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Parts of New York City are under evacuation orders, with more than 370,000 people ordered to leave low-lying areas as Hurricane Irene approaches the city. But on Saturday afternoon, at least, some residents were making the most of it.

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Science
3:25 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

Is Steve Jobs One Of America's Great Innovators?

Steve Jobs, the now-former CEO of Apple, holds up an iPhone at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco in June 2010. Jobs announced on Wednesday that he would be resigning as CEO of Apple.
Paul Sakuma AP

Steve Jobs stepped down this week as CEO of Apple after running the company for nearly 25 years.

The very first Macintosh computer, the iPod audio player and most recently the iPad are just a few of the products Jobs has created that have changed the way millions of people live their lives.

As one of the great American innovators in recent years, comparisons can be drawn between Jobs and other great innovators like Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, both technological titans of American History.

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Africa
2:01 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

Humanitarian Situation In Tripoli Increasingly Dire

Though rebels have consolidated control over Tripoli, life in the Libyan capital grows more difficult by the day. Residents scramble just to get basic supplies, such as food and water.

The city's tap water normally comes from what Moammar Gadhafi touted as the "Eighth Wonder of the World," the Great Man-Made River. The system channels water from deep wells in the desert to Tripoli and other parts of Western Libya.

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

More Than 9,000 Flights Cancelled Due To Irene

Hurricane Irene has forced airlines to cancel more than 9,000 flights this weekend, with the AP reporting 3,600 cancellations on Saturday.

United Continental and Delta Air Lines, two of America's largest airlines, have each announced thousands of cancellations for the period between Saturday and Monday. International carriers, such as British Airways, have also cancelled flights to the U.S. East Coast that were scheduled for late Saturday or Sunday.

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Around the Nation
12:40 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

El Paso Weathers Drought, Thanks To Lawn Policy

For decades, the city of El Paso, in far West Texas, defied the look of most desert communities, with neighborhoods boasting lush, green lawns and residents freely running their sprinklers.

Then a study came out in 1979 that showed just how close El Paso was to a crisis: At its rate of water use, the city would run dry within 36 years.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

N.J. Gov. To Senior Citizens: Please Get On The Buses And Leave

"I can't make you ... I'm not going to arrest you."

But please, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) just told 600 senior citizens who live in Atlantic City: Let the state evacuate you before Hurricane Irene slams into the high-rise buildings where you live.

The residents have so far refused to leave.

Christie said the state is going to send buses to the seniors' buildings in the hopes they can be convinced to go to inland shelters.

"Let us walk you downstairs and put you on those buses," he added.

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World
11:40 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Is Libya The First 'True Arab Revolution?'

The Libyan rebels' takeover of Tripoli may be a landmark of the movement known as the Arab Spring, but does it qualify as a revolution?

James DeFronzo, author of the book Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements, thinks it's still too early to tell.

"You have to have some great structural, institutional change for an uprising to eventually be legitimately called a revolution," he tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan.

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Africa
11:23 am
Sat August 27, 2011

U.S. Aids Hunt For Gadhafi, Drawing On Iraq Lesson

A bullet-riddled mural portrait of Moammar Gadhafi sits on a wall in Tripoli. Libyan rebels are looking for the former leader, aided by foreign intelligence services and U.S. spy drones.
Francois Mori AP

It took a U.S.-led invasion force of more than 200,000 troops nine months to scour Iraq's nearly 170,000 square miles before they captured Saddam Hussein, in one of the largest manhunts ever.

Now, Moammar Gadhafi is on the run in Libya — but chasing after him is a much smaller and less well-equipped force of Libyan rebels. They're trying to track down a fugitive who, like Saddam, is well-armed, well-funded and capable of winning popular support and sowing instability simply by evading his pursuers.

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Africa
11:11 am
Sat August 27, 2011

In Libya, Gas Prices Rise As Rebels Seek Control

Rebel supporters burn books on the philosophy of Gadhafi in Tripoli on Saturday. Libyan rebel leaders say they're negotiating with regime loyalists in holdout towns.
Sergey Ponomarev AP

Originally published on Sat August 27, 2011 12:07 pm

Libyan rebels fought to gain control of a major supply road to Tripoli on Saturday, seizing a border crossing with Tunisia and strengthening their hold on the oil-rich country as they hunt for Moammar Gadhafi.

Controlling the road from the Tunisian border to the capital would help ease growing shortages of fuel and food, particularly in the battle-scarred city.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

First Irene-Related Deaths Reported

The first deaths in the U.S. related to Hurricane Irene to be reported come from North Carolina.

The Raleigh News & Observer writes that:

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