Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Global Health
1:28 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

In Pakistan, Birth Control And Religion Clash

Tariq Ahmed, a jobless father of six sons and one daughter, insisted on having another child. His wife, Rani Tariq, said she was already ill and over-burdened with seven children. But she's pregnant again.
Julie McCarthy NPR

In Pakistan, family planning is an uncomfortable topic fraught with religious overtones.

But in one of Asia's fastest growing populations, a story of women giving birth challenges stereotypes, including what Islam has to say about women's health and family planning.

According to a new government survey, Pakistan is producing nearly 4 million babies every year, and most are born into poverty. The World Bank says 60 percent of Pakistanis live on less than $2 a day.

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

U.S. Budget Deficit Hit $1.1 Trillion In July

The U.S. budget deficit stood at $1.1 trillion through July, the Treasury Department says, making 2011 the third consecutive year that the deficit has hit at least $1 trillion. The federal government's budget year begins in October, leaving two more months in which the deficit might rise.

Looking at the numbers for July alone, the U.S. budget shortfall was $129 billion — a drop in spending from July 2010, according to Bloomberg.

As the AP reports:

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

Why Are Spanish Mice Resistant To A Common Poison?

A mouse runs onto the pitch during the English Premier League football match. The hybrid, poison resistant mouse hasn't reached England, so this is one probably has its DNA intact.
Andrew Yates AFP/Getty Images

Here's a piece of biology news that escaped us, last month, but was brought to our attention by a story in the BBC today: Biologist have found the reason house mice in Spain and Germany have grown immune to warfarin, a commonly used poison.

The idea of a poison-resistant mouse is a bit unsettling, but how it came to be is fascinating tale of cross-species sex. The BBC reports:

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

Stay On Target: NASA's Rover Reaches Huge Crater On Mars

A portion of the west rim of Endeavour crater sweeps southward in this view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. NASA adjusted the colors in this image. Fans of the film Capricorn One may want to see the original orange-tinted image.
NASA

You may not have realized it, but a piece of U.S. property was recently driving around on the surface of Mars. Tens of millions of miles away from the debt crisis, the heat wave and other big events of the summer, NASA's rover Opportunity just completed a 13-mile trip to allow scientists to examine a Martian crater.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:02 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

Organic Poultry Farms Have Fewer Drug-Resistant Bacteria, Study Finds

Proponents of organic meat often make the case that it's inherently better for people's health and the environment than meat raised by conventional farming methods. But the actual impacts of organic production can be tough for scientists to prove.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Man On 41-Day Hunger Strike Asks For Meeting With Georgia's Governor

Salvador Zamora.
Cobb Immigrant Alliance

Salvador Zamora's hunger strike began the day Georgia's immigration law went into effect. Yesterday, on the 40th day of his strike, Zamora, pushed in a wheelchair by a cadre of fellow activists, delivered a letter to Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal's office.

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Wed August 10, 2011

U.S. Says Syria Would 'Better Off Without' Assad

The White House said today that Syria would be "better off without" President Bashar Assad as its leader. White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said during his daily press briefing that Assad had lost his "legitimacy."

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Wed August 10, 2011

'Dougherty Gang' Caught In Colorado After Car Crash; Wanted For Robbery

Ryan Edward Dougherty, Dylan Dougherty Stanley, and Lee Grace Dougherty are seen in a composite photo assembled from their drivers' license pictures.
Pasco County Sheriff's Office

The "Dougherty Gang" — two brothers and their sister who are accused of a crime spree that began in their native Florida — has been captured in Colorado, The Denver Post reports. Ryan Dougherty, 21, Dylan Dougherty Stanley, 26, and Lee Grace Dougherty, 29, were reportedly arrested one day after visiting an REI store in Colorado Springs, where a tipster phoned police.

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Europe
10:00 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Young, Racially-Mixed Working Class Fuels U.K. Uproar

Youths throw bricks at police in this Sunday, Aug. 7, 2011 photo during unrest in Enfield, north London. Nearly 1,200 people have been arrested since the riots erupted Saturday, mostly poor youths from a broad section of Britain's many races and ethnicities. Britain is bitterly divided on the reasons behind the riots.
Karel Prinsloo AP

Originally published on Wed August 10, 2011 1:33 pm

More than 16,000 police officers flooded into London streets Wednesday, but unrest has spread to other cities. To learn what the country looks like now, which groups of people are rioting, and what political leaders can do to possibly end riots, guest host Allison Keyes speaks with a London-based reporter, and the founder of Britain's Operation Black Vote.

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