The Two-Way
7:19 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Philip Levine Named As America's New Poet Laureate

America's new poet laureate, Philip Levine, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1995. Here, he's seen in a file photo at the San Joaquin River Center in Fresno, Calif.
Gary Kazanjian AP

America has a new poet laureate today, as the Library of Congress names Philip Levine in the one-year position. He will succeed W.S. Merwin in the post. Born in Detroit in 1928, Levine has used his poetry to examine blue-collar life, often embroidering everyday events with a sense of myth.

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It's All Politics
7:04 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Wisconsin Republicans Repel Democrats, Retain State Senate Control

Wisconsin state capitol, March 2011.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

It was certainly closer than Wisconsin's Republicans would have preferred, but in the end they successfully repelled Democrats who sought to wrest away control of the state Senate and break GOP dominance over the Badger State's government.

Democrats fell one Senate seat short of the three they needed to take over that chamber in the state's largest recall election ever in which six seats were contested.

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Europe
6:50 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Cameron Promises Order As British Rioting Continues

Police collect evidence at the scene where three people were killed after being struck by a vehicle in the Winson Green area on Aug. 10 in Birmingham, England. The three men were allegedly trying to protect local stores from looters.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:34 am

British Prime Minister David Cameron vowed Wednesday to do "whatever is necessary" to halt massive riots that have swept London and other major cities in recent days — the worst such violence to hit the country in decades.

A wave of arson and looting that started in parts of London on Saturday has spread to other cities, including Manchester and Birmingham.

Cameron, who has recalled Parliament from its summer recess for an emergency debate on the riots, said police have drawn up contingency plans to "do whatever is necessary to restore law and order onto our streets.

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Opinion
6:48 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Foreign Policy: Downgrade Good As Gold, Literally

Since 1937, Colombia has been the largest producer of gold for the United States. Investors are turning to gold as the the economy struggles.
iStockphoto.com

Elizabeth Dickinson is a freelance journalist and former assistant managing editor at Foreign Policy.

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Opinion
6:48 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Weekly Standard: President Cheats On School Reform

The legality of President Obama's education waivers has come under question.
iStockphoto.com

Joy Pullmann is managing editor of School Reform News and an education research fellow at The Heartland Institute.

The president has decided to take a tack on the largest federal education law he certainly wishes were available in budget battles: bypassing Congress and legislating through administrative agencies by offering states waivers in exchange for education policies he favors.

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Opinion
6:48 am
Wed August 10, 2011

New Republic: Risky Approach On Education Reform

President Barack Obama walks with Education Secretary Arne Duncan at the White House in Washington in May. Duncan wants school to meet a set of condition in order to take advantage of the president's education waivers.
Charles Dharapak AP

Simon van Zuylen-Wood is a reporter-researcher at The New Republic.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Whole Foods: Ramadan Promotion Has Not Been Canceled

A Whole Foods store in San Rafael, Calif. (Feb. 17, 2010, file photo.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Looking to set the record straight, the Whole Foods grocery chain says it is "still carrying and promoting halal products for those that are celebrating Ramadan this month."

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Mark Memmott is one of the hosts of NPR's "The Two-Way" news blog.

"The Two-Way," which Memmott helped to launched when he came to NPR in 2009, focuses on breaking news, analysis, and the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

Before joining NPR, Memmott worked for nearly 25 years as a reporter and editor at USA Today. He focused on a range of coverage from politics, foreign affairs, economics, and the media. He's reported from places across the Unites States and the world, including half a dozen trips to Afghanistan in 2002-2003.

The Two-Way
5:25 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Markets On Rise; London Calmer, But Rioting Elsewhere In U.K.

A woman walks past a broken cafe window in London earlier today (Aug. 10, 2011).
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Good morning.

Financial markets in Asia and Europe have rallied today, extending the rebound that began on Wall Street Tuesday afternoon after the Federal Reserve said it plans to keep interest rates at rock-bottom levels for the next two years in a bid to help keep ailing economies from weakening further.

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Andrea Seabrook covers Capitol Hill as NPR's Congressional Correspondent.

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