WPR News
10:54 am
Thu February 16, 2006

Bill to Ban Open Containers Up for Debate Again

WPR News
8:59 am
Wed February 15, 2006

Feedgrounds Focus of Lawsuit

Bozeman, MT – Wyoming's winter elk feeding program is the target of a new lawsuit. Three conservation groups say the program unnaturally concentrates elk on feed-grounds, creating a greater risk of disease. Brucellosis already occurs at high levels among feed-ground elk. And the groups worry about the westward spread of chronic wasting disease, which scientists believe could infect 50% of feed-ground elk herds. Earthjustice Attorney Tim Preso is representing the environmental groups.

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WPR News
8:57 am
Wed February 15, 2006

Legislative Correspondence Bills Move Forward

Cheyenne, WY – An effort to keep e-mails and certain legislative communications secret will move forward. A Senate committee gave unanimous support to a bill permitting lawmakers to delete all e-mail correspondence. The panel also signed off on a bill to keep secret all communications with staff. The second measure could also keep away from public view discussion about proposed bills, drafts of legislation, and consultant reports. The Wyoming Press Association objects to both measures, and wants lawmakers to keep as much information before the public as possible.

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WPR News
8:55 am
Wed February 15, 2006

Coal Creek Mine Reopening Announced

Gillette, WY – Arch Coal plans to invest $50 million to reopen a Campbell County coal mine sometime this summer or early fall. The Coal Creek mine has been idle since 2000. It is where Denver-based K-F-x Incorporated has proposed building a plant that to process coal to make it burn more cleanly. The announcement of the re-opening of the mine coincides with record-high coal production and prices in the Powder River Basin. Last year, the basin produced about a third of the nation's coal, or 390 million tons.

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WPR News
2:25 am
Wed February 15, 2006

Pacific Power Electric Rates Going Up

Laramie, Wy – The state Public Service Commission approved a 25 million dollar rate increase for PacifiCorp customers in Wyoming.
Pacificorp supplies electricity to consumers in Wyoming. The increase means the average residential customer can expect to pay an extra four-dollars-and-75-cents per month on their utility bills.
PacifiCorp operates in the state as Pacific Power. It has about 130-thousand electric customers in a service area that includes much of southwest Wyoming, the Casper area and parts of Fremont County and the Big Horn Basin.

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WPR News
1:47 am
Wed February 15, 2006

No Extra Punishment for Killers of Pregnant Women

Cheyenne, Wy – The Wyoming Senate voted down a bill to give longer sentences to people convicted of killing pregnant women. Abortion rights groups opposed the bill saying they're concerned about the additional stature an unborn child could have received under Wyoming law. The bill would have automatically added 20 years to a murder conviction if the fetus dies. Senator John Barrasso argued that when a pregnant woman dies there is more then one victim.

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WPR News
1:47 am
Wed February 15, 2006

No Extra Punishment for Killers of Pregnant Women

Cheyenne, Wy – The Wyoming Senate voted down a bill to give longer sentences to people convicted of killing pregnant women. Abortion rights groups opposed the bill saying they're concerned about the additional stature an unborn child could have received under Wyoming law. The bill would have automatically added 20 years to a murder conviction if the fetus dies. Senator John Barrasso argued that when a pregnant woman dies there is more then one victim.

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WPR News
10:17 am
Tue February 14, 2006

Qwest's 4th Quarter Loss Widens

WPR News
8:57 am
Tue February 14, 2006

Senate Committee Passes Bill to Allow Money for Tribes

Cheyenne, WY – A State Senate Committee has passed a bill that would allow state money to fund government services on the Wind River Reservation. The proposed constitutional amendment aims to eliminate a legal hurdle that has kept state money from going to the tribes because they're a sovereign nation. Allison Sage, the Arapaho tribal liaison, says they only want the same treatment as other taxpayers. Some tribal members worry about giving up sovereignty, so Sage says it's a delicate situation. The resolution now heads to the Senate floor.

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