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12:59 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?

LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 1:46 pm

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.

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The Two-Way
12:56 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Scientists Study How We Evolved To Stand On Our Own Two Fins

Researchers raised two groups of walking, air-breathing Polypterus senegalus β€” one on land and one on the water. They discovered that each group was able to adapt to be best suited to its environment.
A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson McGill University

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 1:18 pm

Scientists examining an unusual African fish that can walk and breathe air think they've learned a thing or two about how our distant ancestors made the leap from the oceans to terra firma some 400 million years ago.

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The Two-Way
12:22 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Fatal Shooting At Firing Range Sparks Debate About Safety

A man closes off an entrance to the Last Stop shooting range in White Hills, Ariz., on Wednesday. Instructor Charles Vacca was killed at the range Monday by a 9-year-old girl he was teaching to use an Uzi submachine gun.
John Locher AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 3:19 pm

A 9-year-old girl in Arizona on Monday accidentally killed her firing-range instructor when she lost control of an Uzi submachine gun.

The news has ignited a debate in the country about access to guns and the wisdom of state law and parents who allow children to shoot them. It also brought up a host of questions. We've answered three of the main ones below:

Is it common for kids to shoot guns at ranges?

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Goats and Soda
12:08 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Ebola Is Rapidly Mutating As It Spreads Across West Africa

A technician tests fluid samples from Ebola-infected patients at a field lab, run by Doctors Without Borders, in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 3:23 am

For the first time, scientists have been able to follow the spread of an Ebola outbreak almost in real time, by sequencing the virus' genome from people in Sierra Leone.

The findings, published Thursday in the journal Science, offer new insights into how the outbreak started in West Africa and how fast the virus is mutating.

A international team of researchers sequenced 99 Ebola genomes, with extremely high accuracy, from 78 people diagnosed with Ebola in Sierra Leone in June.

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The Two-Way
10:03 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Murder Charges Dismissed Against Former Top Thai Leaders

Suthep Thaugsuban, a former deputy prime minister who ordered a bloody crackdown on protesters in 2010 and later encouraged a coup against the elected government, arrives at court on Thursday. In recent weeks, Suthep has become a Buddhist monk.
Narong Sangnak EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 10:52 am

A court in Thailand has dismissed murder charges against a former prime minister and his deputy who led anti-government protests that triggered a coup toppling the elected government in May.

Thailand's Criminal Court ruled Thursday that it did not have jurisdiction in the case against former Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva and former Deputy Prime Minister Suthep Thaugsuban.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Thu August 28, 2014

'Geography Can Be Tough': Canada Trolls Russia For Ukraine Action

NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 1:54 pm

Russian troops are entering Ukraine β€” this much is known β€” but whether they are mounting a "full-scale invasion," as one Ukrainian official told CNN, or are mistakenly crossing over, as Moscow itself claims, is uncertain.

Enter Canada.

Our northern neighbor's delegation to NATO had this useful tweet to remind everyone how, in its words, "Geography can be tough."

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Goats and Soda
9:21 am
Thu August 28, 2014

In Haiti, An 'American Idol'-Style Contest About Child Slavery

Hedson Lamour, 28, prays with his color-coordinated band before performing. He entered the contest because his mom was a child slave.
Frederic Dupoux for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 11:33 am

Haiti's got talent.

Tamarre Joseph paces the stage, her sleek, short blue dress hugging her pencil-thin frame. She works the hometown crowd, rapping "Nap rive peyi san restavek."

The thousands in the packed stadium jump and sing along. An entire section of men take off their shirts and wave them overhead.

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Shots - Health News
9:03 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Hey, You've Got Mites Living On Your Face. And I Do, Too

Want to find your personal posse of Demodex mites? Gently scrape the pores on the sides of your nose.
Juergen Peter Bosse iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 11:20 am

When Megan Thoemmes first found a tiny critter living in the pores of her nose, she was disgusted.

"The first time I found one on my face I didn't sleep for four nights," says Thoemmes, a graduate student at North Carolina State University.

But she's made peace with her Demodex mites, not only accepting that the microscopic arthropods are hers for life, but conducting a study that finds that everybody else has them, too.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Thu August 28, 2014

China Warns U.S. Over Surveillance Flights

This handout photo provided by the Office of the Defense Secretary (OSD), taken Aug. 19, 2014, shows a Chinese fighter jet that the White House said Friday conducted a "dangerous intercept" of a U.S. Navy surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft.
Uncredited AP

Beijing has rejected U.S. claims that one of its fighter jets acted recklessly in intercepting a U.S. Navy maritime patrol plane in the South China Sea last week, warning Washington to curtail or discontinue "close surveillance" flights near Chinese territory.

"According to different situations we will adopt different measures to make sure we safeguard our air and sea security of the country," Defense Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun said at a news briefing.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Sister Of Boston Bombing Suspects Arrested Over Bomb Threat

Ailiana Tsarnaeva, sister of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, departs district court in Boston's South Boston neighborhood in October.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 12:43 pm

The sister of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects was arrested on Tuesday and accused of making a bomb threat against her boyfriend's ex-girlfriend.

The Boston Herald reports:

"Ailina Tsarnaeva, 24, of North Bergen, N.J., turned herself in to officers in Manhattan around 2:30 p.m. yesterday and was charged with aggravated harassment, according to police.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Russian Hackers Reportedly Hit JPMorgan, Other Banks

JPMorgan Chase & Co. headquarters in New York. The bank is one of several reportedly targeted by Russian hackers.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 9:21 am

The FBI says it's working with the Secret Service to investigate reports that Russian hackers breached security at JPMorgan Chase and other financial institutions, stealing customers' account information in possible retaliation for U.S. government sanctions on Moscow.

"We are working with the United States Secret Service to determine the scope of recently reported cyberattacks against several American financial institutions," FBI spokesman Joshua Campbell said in a statement late Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Federal Judge Strikes Down Part Of Utah's Polygamy Ban

Kody Brown poses with his wives (from left) Janelle, Christine, Meri and Robyn in a promotional photo for TLC's reality TV show Sister Wives.
Bryant Livingston AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 8:03 am

A federal judge on Wednesday finalized a ruling that strikes down part of Utah's ban on polygamy.

The case is high profile partly because the suit was brought forth by the Brown family, the stars of the TLC show Sister Wives. It's also important because as it works its way through the appeals process, it has the potential to become a landmark.

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The Two-Way
7:23 am
Thu August 28, 2014

State Department 'Looking Into' Reports Of Another Jihadi Killed In Syria

A photo from March 2008 provided by the Hennepin County, Minn., Sheriff's Office shows Douglas McAuthur McCain, who was killed recently fighting alongside Islamic State militants in Syria.
AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 11:15 am

After U.S. officials confirmed earlier this week that 33-year-old San Diego resident Douglas McCain had died fighting alongside Islamic State militants in Syria, the State Department says it's looking into a report that a second American was also killed there.

NBC, citing an anonymous source, first reported on the second American jihadi, and State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki says officials are aware of the report and are "looking into it."

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The Two-Way
6:09 am
Thu August 28, 2014

USC's Josh Shaw Suspended For Making Up Heroic Tale

USC Trojans cornerback Josh Shaw in brighter days.
Jeff Gross Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 8:18 am

The University of Southern California has suspended cornerback Josh Shaw indefinitely after he admitted to fabricating a heroic tale that explained his sprained ankles.

CBS News reports:

Shaw has been suspended indefinitely from all of the Trojans' team activities after acknowledging his heroic tale was "a complete fabrication," the school announced in a statement Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
5:26 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Obama Blames Russia For Violence In Ukraine; Calls Moves 'Incursion'

President Obama said at a White House news conference Thursday that Russia is to blame for the violence in eastern Ukraine.
Larry Downing Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 3:38 pm

Updated at 4:47 p.m.

President Obama blamed Russia for the violence in Ukraine and said its "incursion" into the former Soviet state will only carry additional costs.

"Russia has deliberately and repeatedly violated the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, and the new images of Russian forces inside Ukraine make that plain for the world to see," Obama said at a White House news conference on Thursday.

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Author Interviews
5:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Telling Crimea's Story Through Children's Books

Author Lily Hyde adds a dash of magic to her children's stories about Eastern Europe.
Corbis

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 7:57 am

Understanding all the players, alliances and political stakes in the rapidly shifting crisis in Ukraine can be challenging for anyone unfamiliar with Eastern Europe and its history. And it doesn't get any simpler when you step back a century or two β€” which is why Lily Hyde's stories blending history, myth and geopolitics are grabbing the attention of readers, reporters and activists alike.

We all want to believe in fairy tales. Hyde takes it one step further, using fairy tales as inspiration to share stories about Eastern European history with children and young adults.

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Animals
4:56 am
Thu August 28, 2014

China Accuses Panda Of Faking Pregnancies To Get Treats

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Sports
4:40 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Jamaica Sets Its Sights On Winter Olympic Hockey Team

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Get A Russian Mortgage, Get A Cat

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Colossal Dam Removal Project Frees Washington's Elwa River

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

Copyright 2014 Puget Sound Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.kuow.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Politics
3:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Survey: Americans Are Grumpy About Economic Recovery

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Ex-Assistant Pleads Guilty To Art Theft

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
1:47 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Former Border Protection Insider Alleges Corruption, Distortion In Agency

James Tomsheck poses in his office in Washington in June 2009. At the time, he was assistant commissioner for internal affairs with U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 6:53 am

Two months ago, James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

At the time, authorities criticized him for not doing enough to investigate abuse and corruption.

But now Tomsheck tells a very different story: about a culture that goes out of its way to evade legal restraints.

Use of force by law enforcement agents along the Southwest border has drawn attention and criticism recently, after reports that Border Patrol agents shot and killed unarmed migrants and faced no consequences.

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Science
1:46 am
Thu August 28, 2014

An Icy Solution To The Mystery Of The Slithering Stones

The cavity in this rock will carry the GPS instrument package and its battery pack across the desert.
Richard Norris

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 7:46 am

A century ago, miners working in California's Death Valley reported seeing boulders on the desert floor with long trails behind them β€” as if the stones had been pushed across the sand. But despite 60 years of trying, no one ever saw what moved them.

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Planet Money
1:44 am
Thu August 28, 2014

A Mall With Two Minimum Wages

Wetzel's Pretzels employee Emperatriz Orozco hands out free samples at the Westfield Valley Fair Mall.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 5:20 am

The Westfield Valley Fair Mall straddles two cities. One side of the mall is in Santa Clara, but walk a few feet down the mall, and you're in San Jose. In 2012, San Jose voters agreed to raise the city's minimum wage from $8 to $10 an hour.

Philip Sandigo manages a shoe store on the $8-an-hour side. When San Jose raised the minimum wage, he lost about half his staff.

They went to the stores on the side of the mall that paid $2 an hour more.

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The Salt
1:43 am
Thu August 28, 2014

How Foster Farms Is Solving The Case Of The Mystery Salmonella

Bob O'Connor, a Foster Farms veterinarian, holds an 11-day-old chick at a ranch near the town of Merced, in California's Central Valley.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 11:57 am

Foster Farms, California's biggest chicken producer, has been accused of poisoning people with salmonella bacteria. After an outbreak last fall, the U.S. Department of Agriculture threatened to shut down three of the company's plants.

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Parallels
1:42 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Brooklyn Man Fights In Syria. Is He A Threat To The U.S.?

This image obtained by NPR shows Ahmed al-Moflihi, a Yemeni-American who is believed to have fought in the Syrian civil war.
NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 8:59 am

Mocha Hookah is a little Middle Eastern restaurant and cafe on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn where you can pick up a shawarma gyro sandwich and a falafel platter and still get change back from your $20 bill. Walk inside and there's Arabic music, soccer games on flat screen televisions, and a hookah, or water pipe, set up at every table.

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It's All Politics
5:04 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Former Iowa Lawmaker Admits To Getting Payoff Before 2012 Caucuses

Kent Sorenson says he was paid for his endorsement of Ron Paul in the 2012 presidential campaign β€” and that the exchange was hidden from the public.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 7:24 pm

A former Iowa state senator says he concealed money he took for shifting loyalty from Rep. Michele Bachmann to then-Rep. Ron Paul during the 2012 presidential campaign.

There's always a certain amount of weirdness in the Iowa presidential caucuses, and in the 2012 cycle the peak weirdness might have come just before New Year's. Republican state Sen. Kent Sorenson, the Iowa chairman for Bachmann's campaign, jumped to the Paul campaign six days before the voting β€” immediately setting off rumors that he had taken a payoff for switching sides.

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

ACLU, U.S. Settle Lawsuit On Deportation Of Immigrants

Marta Mendoza, a 47-year-old Mexican woman, had lived in the Los Angeles area illegally for 32 years. There, she raised six children, all U.S. citizens.

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The Salt
3:40 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Diplomats And Lawyers Try To Define 'Culturally Acceptable Food'

Tractors sit on a sugarcane plantation on the land of a Guarani-KaiowΓ‘ indigenous community in Brazil, where Oxfam has alleged "land grabs" unfairly take land from the poor. The United Nations is drafting voluntary guidelines for "responsible investment in agriculture and food systems" in response to such concerns.
Tatiana Cardeal Courtesy of Oxfam

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 4:31 pm

Here's a fine topic for a graduate seminar in anthropology: What makes food culturally acceptable? Cue discussions of values and taboos, tastes and traditions.

Now make room for diplomats and lawyers, because this question has popped up, improbably, during international negotiations at the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome.

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