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The Picture Show
3:33 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

The Power Of Flower Photos

Darryl Pitt

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 8:39 am

I can't remember exactly when I received the first flower email, but I do remember it was sometime in 2005.

At the time, I had no idea why my old friend Darryl Pitt had sent it, but I didn't think too much about it. A flower. OK. That's nice. But then the flowers continued to arrive day after day after day — and soon a modest digital bouquet turned into a meadow, and that meadow into a hillside of, as always, flowers.

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Africa
3:10 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Political Rift Widens Between Egyptian Islamists

Egyptian presidential candidate Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh is welcomed by supporters upon his arrival at a meeting north of Cairo, on April 26. He was formerly a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, but was kicked out of the organization.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:31 pm

The two top Islamists running in Egypt's first real presidential race share a common history.

Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh, a physician, is a former senior leader in the Muslim Brotherhood whose moderate stance has made him popular not only with Islamists, but with liberal and secular Egyptians.

Mohammed Morsi, an engineer, heads the Brotherhood's political party, which holds nearly half the seats in parliament.

Yet despite their common political background, the two men are bitter rivals.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
2:50 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

A Need For Speed: Inside Jamaica's Sprint Factory

Jamaica's Usain Bolt shattered world records in the 100 and 200 meter races at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Shown here in the 200 meters at Beijing, he's looking to repeat this summer at the London Olympics and add another chapter to Jamaica's great tradition of sprinting.
Julian Finney Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 8:09 pm

When it comes to sprinting, Jamaica reigns supreme.

At the Beijing Olympics in 2008, a Jamaican man — Usain Bolt — and a woman — Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce — took home the golds in the 100-meter race, and at this summer's London games, they're hoping to do it again.

If you visit the Caribbean island nation, you'll hear a lot of explanations for why they're so good, but let's start with the obvious: In Jamaica, kids really like to run.

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Sports
2:45 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Churchill Downs Supervisor Beginning His Last Lap

The field of horses charges down the stretch in the seventh race at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky., on June 19, 2009. The day marked the first night racing at the storied track in its 135-year history. Track superintendent Butch Lehr is retiring after Saturday's race. He's been maintaining the track since 1982.
Ed Reinke AP

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:04 pm

The surface on which Kentucky Derby horses will race Saturday is a special piece of real estate, built for high performance and safety. The track is generically described as dirt, but is actually a careful mixture of river sand, silt and clay.

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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

23 Dead, 9 Hanged From Bridge In Nuevo Laredo, Mexico

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:24 pm

It has been a bloody day for the Mexican border-town of Nuevo Laredo. It started at dawn when 9 bodies were found hanging from a bridge of a major thoroughfare that connects Nuevo Laredo to Monterrey.

And as the day went by, the mutilated bodies of 14 others were found across the city.

El Universal, one of Mexico's largest dailies, reports:

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National Security
2:22 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

At Sept. 11 Trial, Military Commissions Face Scrutiny

In this photograph of a courtroom sketch, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, charged with orchestrating the Sept. 11 attacks, attends a court hearing at Guantanamo in 2008. He's expected to appear in a military court Saturday.
Janet Hamlin AP

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:04 pm

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other men charged in the Sept. 11 attacks were supposed to be tried six years ago in a military tribunal created by the Bush administration.

But that system — which allowed hearsay evidence, among other things — faced questions about its fundamental fairness. When President Obama came into office, he put all the proceedings at Guantanamo on hold and asked that the commission system be revamped.

Since then, there has been an effort to make sure the trials at Guantanamo are credible, with both Congress and the Supreme Court weighing in.

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Movie Interviews
2:17 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Actor Bill Nighy On Career, 'Marigold Hotel'

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Fans of British drama will find pleasure in a film arriving on these shores today. "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" follows a group of British retirees who move to India looking for a more affordable life.

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Middle East
2:17 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Closing In On The Egyptian Presidential Elections

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:04 pm

Political tensions are rising in Egypt ahead of the presidential elections later in May. Deadly protests in the capital are jeopardizing the already fragile transition process that started a year ago after the ousting of former President Hosni Mubarak. Robert Siegel talks to Egyptian parliament member Amr Hamzawy for more.

The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

'A Factor In A Much Larger Life': Debating Chen Guangcheng's Blindness

Chen Guangcheng at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. This photo was released by the Embassy's press office.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 8:55 am

If you've been following the case of Chen Guangcheng, the activist looking to leave China for the U.S., there's one thing you probably know about him.

The fact that he's blind.

But is Chen's blindness central to his story – his political activism and the diplomatic dance he has set off?

"His blindness did not give him any particular bravery or insight," says Stephen Kuusisto, the author of two memoirs about being blind. "It is just a factor in a much larger life,"

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Technology
1:45 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Have You Friended Your Favorite Cause?

Robin Roberts of Good Morning America talks with Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg about Facebook's new tool that lets users share their organ donor status.
Rick Rowell AP

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 11:45 am

Hours after Facebook put out a call Tuesday for its users to register as organ donors, 6,000 people had already signed up. That's more than 15 times the number of people who normally register each day, according to Donate Life America, which is collaborating with Facebook.

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Economy
1:35 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

'Dejected': Some Unemployed Give Up The Hunt

People wait at a job fair in New York City's Queens borough on Thursday. While millions of out-of-work Americans continue to seek employment, others have given up looking.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

The unemployment rate slipped a notch to 8.1 percent in April, but not because employers went on a hiring spree.

Instead, the jobless rate appeared to improve because fewer people were applying for positions. Last month, the civilian labor force shrank by 342,000 people.

Economists say many of those workforce dropouts were "discouraged" workers who moved to the sidelines after months, even years, of trying to nail down jobs.

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The Record
1:30 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Adam Yauch, Co-Founder Of The Beastie Boys, Dies

Adam Yauch (left) with the Beastie Boys in 1987. The gruff-voiced rapper known as MCA died Friday after a battle with cancer.
Ebet Roberts Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 5, 2012 10:29 am

Adam Yauch, the raspy-voiced rapper known as MCA of the Beastie Boys, died Friday in New York at the age of 47. Yauch was diagnosed with cancer in 2009 and had been largely out of the spotlight since.

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It's All Politics
1:18 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Surprising No One, Obama, Romney Don't Agree On Meaning Of April Jobs Stats

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 2:57 pm

Justin Wolfers, an economist known for, among other things, his sardonic wit, may have made the best comment of the day on the heels of the April jobs report out Friday. He tweeted:

"The worst part of today's jobs report? It provides just enough inane talking points for both sides of politics."

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The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

New Allegations Of Sexual Misconduct Surface Against Dominique Strauss-Kahn

Dominique Strauss-Kahn in the studio of the French TV network TF1.
Francois Guillot AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 1:13 pm

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former chief at the International Monetary Fund, is facing more allegations of sexual misconduct.

Strauss-Kahn was considered a top contender for the French presidency until he was accused of rape by a New York City hotel maid. That case against him was dropped, but it cost him his IMF job and then French investigators implicated Strauss-Kahn in a prostitution probe.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Beastie Boys' Adam Yauch Has Died

Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys during a 2001 performance in New York City.
Scott Gries Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 1:26 pm

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET: The news that Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys has died has now been confirmed by the group's public relations firm.

Our original post:

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Shots - Health Blog
11:38 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Arrests Made In $75 Million Prescription Drug Heist

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 11:55 am

Two brothers have been charged in connection with one of the nation's largest drug heists, along with 20 other people in an organized crime ring that stretched from Florida to New Jersey and Connecticut.

It's the culmination of a three-year FBI investigation in which undercover agents managed to prevent any of the stolen drugs from entering the marketplace, the Associated Press reported yesterday.

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The Two-Way
11:23 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Police In New York Clock Motorcyclist Going 170 MPH

Nikkolaus McCarthy.
New York State Police

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 2:59 pm

Talk about a heavy hand: State police say they clocked Nikkolaus McCarthy, 25, flying across the New York Thruway at 170 mph.

That's not a typo. Police said when they finally caught up with him 50 miles later and told McCarthy how fast he was going, he allegedly bragged saying his bike could break the 190 mph barrier.

The Albany Times Union reports:

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Election 2012
11:12 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Are Obama And Romney The Same Guy?

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and President Obama will spend the next six months highlighting their differences. But they also share some striking similarities.
Chip Somodevilla/Olivier Douliery Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 4:34 pm

Barack Obama and Mitt Romney just may be the same person. Think about it. Have you ever seen the two of them in the same limo?

All right. Of course, the pair of politicians who will in all likelihood be the major party nominees for the 2012 presidential election have their differences. Republican Romney, for instance, has been a governor and chairman of the Olympics; Democrat Obama has not. Obama, on the other hand, has been a senator and a president. Romney has not.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Syria: Another Protest, Another Crackdown In Aleppo

Free Syrian Army members from the al-Faruq Brigade arrive to attend the funeral of one of their comrades at the Khaled Ibn al-Walid mosque in the al-Khalidiyah neighbourhood of the central Syrian city of Homs on Thursday.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

A day after the security forces of President Bashar Assad raided the campus of Aleppo University, thousands of protesters took to the streets of Syria's second city and its economic powerhouse.

The AP talked to Mohammed Saeed, an activist, who said protesters were "incensed" by the raid at the university, which killed four.

"Everyone wants to express solidarity with those students," the activist told the AP, adding that the forces fired live ammunition into the crowd.

The AP adds:

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Fri May 4, 2012

'Falling Bear,' We Hardly Knew You; Famous Bruin Killed On Highway

The "falling bear" photo that brought him fame.
Andy Duann CU Independent

It was just a week ago that he dropped into our lives.

Now, we're sorry to report that "falling bear" is dead.

In case you're not familiar with the story, it was April 26 when University of Colorado Boulder student Andy Duann snapped a shot of a tranquilized bear as it was falling from a tree on campus.

The bear survived and was released back into the wild about 50 miles from Boulder.

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The Salt
9:32 am
Fri May 4, 2012

The 'Smart Fridge' Finds The Lost Lettuce, For A Price

Samsung's fridge with an LCD screen has 28 cubic feet of space inside.
Courtesy of Samsung

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 8:24 am

Here at The Salt, we've taken note of the all-too-common habit of letting food rot in the fridge. Food waste can cost hundreds of dollars a year, and once it arrives at a landfill to decompose, it turns into a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. And that makes us feel guilty.

Now some home appliance companies are banking on the hope that some consumers will turn over their food waste worries to a computer inside their fridge.

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Movie Reviews
9:23 am
Fri May 4, 2012

A Gershwin Biopic That Ain't Necessarily So True

George Gershwin's most famous works include Rhapsody in Blue, An American in Paris and the opera Porgy and Bess.
Warner Archives

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 1:58 pm

The movie Rhapsody in Blue, a biography of George Gershwin, was released only eight years after his death from a brain tumor at the age of 38. It's a good subject: Gershwin wrote some of the best popular songs ever produced in this country, but he also had ambitions to be a serious classical composer and wrote symphonic music, concertos and an opera — all of which are still performed.

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Fracking: New Rules Aim To Bring 'Best Practices' To Public Lands

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 10:45 am

Saying that the rules would "make sure that fracturing operations conducted on public and Indian lands follow common-sense industry best practices," Interior Secretary Ken Salazar this morning issued proposed regulations that would:

-- Require "public disclosure of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing operations on federal lands."

-- Ensure that "wells used in fracturing operations [on public lands] meet appropriate construction standards."

-- Require operators to "put in place appropriate plans for managing flowback waters from fracturing operations."

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Author Interviews
8:58 am
Fri May 4, 2012

The U.S. Ambassador Inside Hitler's Berlin

Adolf Hitler (right) with his foreign minister Joachim von Ribbentrop in 1941.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 9:23 am

This interview was originally broadcast on May 9, 2011. In The Garden Of Beasts is now available in paperback.

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The Two-Way
8:36 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Junior Seau's Family OKs Having His Brain Studied, 'L.A. Times' Reports

Junior Seau in 2008, when he played for the New England Patriots.
Otto Greule Jr Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 2:49 pm

As soon as it was learned on Wednesday that former NFL star Junior Seau had killed himself, there was speculation about whether he may have suffered brain injuries during his career that in turn led to depression or dementia.

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Shots - Health Blog
8:01 am
Fri May 4, 2012

School Bake Sales Draw Fire In Obesity Battle

Moms and their kids protest a proposed ban on homemade food at bake sales in New York City schools at a rally near City Hall in 2010. One sign read, "I wanna get obese on my terms. No junk food."
edenpictures Flickr

An American tradition is in jeopardy.

The bake sale, a staple of school fundraising for generations, is getting squeezed. The epidemic of childhood obesity is leading some districts to restrict the kinds of foods sold or to ban the sales altogether, Bloomberg Businessweek's Stephanie Armour explained on Friday's Morning Edition.

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Asia
7:57 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Deal Would Allow Activist To Leave China

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Fri May 4, 2012

AP Apologizes For WWII-Era Firing Of Reporter

May 7, 1945: In Frankfurt, Germany, Allied commanders including British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, U.S. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Soviet Marshal Gregori Zhukov and others celebrate the German surrender.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 7:55 am

Sixty seven years later, The Associated Press is apologizing for the way it condemned and then fired one of its correspondents for reporting "perhaps the biggest scoop in its history."

Edward Kennedy was among a small group of reporters taken by Allied military officials to witness the May 7, 1945, surrender by German forces at a schoolhouse in Reims, France.

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Just 115,000 Jobs Added Last Month, But Jobless Rate Dipped To 8.1 Percent

A sign earlier this month in New York City's Queens borough.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 7:58 am

The nation's jobless rate edged down to 8.1 percent in April from 8.2 percent in March, but just 115,000 jobs were added to private and public payrolls, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports.

The job growth was well below expectations and has raised new questions about the strength of the U.S. economy.

We'll add more to this post as we read through the report and gather reactions and analysis. So be sure to hit your "refresh" button to get our latest updates.

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Fri May 4, 2012

No Mo! Yankees Great Mariano Rivera Suffers Possible Career-Ending Injury

New York Yankees pitcher Mariano Rivera, earlier this season.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:19 pm

Update at 5:18 p.m. ET. He'll Be Back:

"I can't go out like this."

That's what Mariano Rivera told the AP about an injury that many thought could end the greatest closer in baseball history's career.

The AP reports that Rivera said he would be back on the mound by 2013.

Our Original Post Continues:

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