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Mitt Romney
11:23 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Where's Mitt Romney? 'Running Out The Clock'

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney arrives with his wife, Ann, for a rally at the American Polish Cultural Center earlier this month in Troy, Mich. The former Massachusetts governor is in effect the front-runner in the race for the GOP nomination, despite holding fewer rallies, town hall meetings or media appearances than other candidates.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 6:02 pm

Through the ups and downs of the Republican presidential campaign, Mitt Romney has remained in effect the front-runner.

He has done so even without holding as many rallies, town hall meetings or meet-and-greet events as some of the other candidates. He's also done fewer media appearances.

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Movie Interviews
9:24 am
Fri November 18, 2011

In 'Beginners,' A Gay Man Comes Out Late In Life

Academy Award nominee Christopher Plummer (left) and Ewan McGregor star as father and son in Mike Mills' Beginners.
Focus Features

This interview was originally broadcast on June 2, 2011. Beginners is now available on DVD.

Filmmaker Mike Mills' parents met in junior high school. For 45 years, they lived together, raising Mills and his older sisters, until Mills' mother died in 1999. Six months later, Mills' father — a 75-year-old retired museum director — announced that he's gay.

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Economy
5:43 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Toast Sandwich Is Cheap And Easy But Is It Good?

In these hard times, Britain's Royal Academy of Chemistry has come up with the cheapest meal of all: a toast sandwich. They found the recipe in the Victorian bestseller: Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management. It's a piece of toast between two buttered slices of bread and costs 12 cents to make.

Around the Nation
5:30 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Columbia's Band Banned From Final Football Game

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 5:31 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. The Columbia University Marching Band is known for its sense of humor, but their joke fell flat at a recent football game against Cornell. In a parody of the school fight song, the band sang: We always lose, lose, lose by a lot; sometimes, by a little - which is accurate. Their loss to Cornell was their ninth straight this year.

The athletic department wasn't amused. They banned the marching band from the final game of the season. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
2:00 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Big, Small Cars Adorn LA Auto Show

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 5:12 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's Nina Gregory was also looking around the L.A. Auto Show searching for new extremes. She wanted to see some of the biggest offerings automakers had on display this year and also the littlest.

NINA GREGORY, BYLINE: The newest entry to the teeny tiny market is the Chevrolet Spark, a 144-inch four-door.

BRANDY SCHAFFELS: You might like the sound...

(SOUNDBITE OF DOOR SLAMMING)

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Asia
2:00 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Obama In Bali For East Asia Summit

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
2:00 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Nissan Displays Redesigned Food Truck At LA Show

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 5:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's consider now, those vehicles that offer something really cheap - the food trucks that have become so popular. At the L.A. Auto Show, Nissan has on display a new truck specially designed for mobile restaurateurs. Our last word in business today is: culinary concept car.

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Business
2:00 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Honda Deflects Criticism Of 2012 Civic

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Los Angeles Auto Show begins today. It's the first of America's car shows and it's where manufacturers put their best foot forward or try to reinvent themselves. One those carmakers is Honda. Honda's production was badly hurt by Japan's earthquake and tsunami, and as it was getting back on track, the floods in Thailand crippled production again. But as NPR's Sonari Glinton reports from the L.A. Auto Show, natural disasters may be the least of Honda's problems.

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Business
2:00 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Oil Prices Raise Sharply On Improving U.S. Economy

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 5:16 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with oil prices hovering around $99 a barrel. Oil has gone up sharply since last month, partly because of signs of improvement in the U.S. economy. Also because of tensions in some oil producing regions, which could affect supplies. Still, the debt crisis in Europe is holding prices below that psychologically important $100 a barrel mark. Benchmark crude was trading in Asia this morning at about $98.90. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
2:00 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Italy's Government Criticizes Debt Crisis Response

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 3:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Italy's new prime minister has pledged far-reaching reforms. An economist himself, Mario Monti has managed to win a vote of confidence for his new national unity government by an overwhelming majority in Italy's senate. Still, Europe's debt crisis is gathering more steam and now pushing borrowing costs for Spain and France sharply higher. As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, pressure is mounting on the European Central Bank to act to stem the crisis.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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Europe
2:00 am
Fri November 18, 2011

Why Germany Needs The Eurozone To Be A Success

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The outcome in Italy is, of course, of huge importance to Germany. Germany is the strongest economy in the eurozone and has a deep historical interest in the euro's success. We asked the economist Nicolas Veron to remind us of Germany's role in this grand monetary experiment.

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Movie Reviews
5:58 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

'The Descendants': In Paradise, A Stranger To Himself

Island Son: George Clooney (left, with Shailene Woodley and Amara Miller) navigates tricky territory as a Hawaii man whose wife is on life support.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Writer-director Alexander Payne is either the American cinema's most acerbic humanist or its most empathetic jerk. Whichever it is, the protagonists of the novels he adapts are outsiders who pay an emotional price for their sense of superiority.

Payne's The Descendants is his first film to be told from the perspective of a person of privilege, but real-estate lawyer Matt King (George Clooney) is the ultimate outsider: a stranger to his family and his lifelong home, Hawaii.

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Movie Interviews
10:08 am
Thu November 17, 2011

In Payne's 'Descendants,' Trouble In The Tropics

George Clooney plays an indifferent husband and father to two daughters, including Shailene Woodley, in The Descendants.
Merie Wallace Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 6:04 pm

Though he's directed only five feature films, Alexander Payne has built a reputation as one of Hollywood's most respected filmmakers. His movies find comedy in the crises of his flawed protagonists — among them Matthew Broderick as a high school teacher in Election, Jack Nicholson as a widower in About Schmidt and Paul Giamatti as a struggling author and wine snob in Sideways, for which Payne shared an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

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Sports
8:20 am
Sat November 12, 2011

MLB's Wilson Ramos Rescued In Venezuela

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host: This WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. In Venezuela, officials have announced a dramatic end to the high-profile kidnapping of Major League Baseball catcher Wilson Ramos. Police commandos swooped in on a remote mountainous hideaway and rescued him. This was the sound at the Ramos home in Valencia, Valenzuela, when he returned there late last night.

(SOUNDBITE OF SIREN AND CHEERING)

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Around the Nation
6:46 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Pigeon Racers Share A Passion For Flying Fast

Racing pigeons are bred to be stronger, smarter and have better endurance than normal pigeons.
Patrick Skahill

Each weekend, Bill Desmarais ships his birds off on a truck and somehow, they find their way home. In his backyard in Massachusetts recently, he welcomed home birds from a race that started 250 miles away in Verona, N.Y.

Pigeons have fascinated people for centuries. Charles Darwin, Pablo Picasso and Walt Disney all kept the birds. Today, thousands — including Mike Tyson — are flocking to the sport of pigeon racing.

Racing pigeons aren't like the pigeons you see in a park. They're stronger, bred for endurance and brains. Some are worth thousands of dollars.

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Commentary
6:12 am
Sat November 12, 2011

American Bluegrass, Imported By A Czech Band

The Czech band Druha Trava will perform in Wichita, Kan., Saturday night. The band is on its U.S. tour.
Don Gonyea NPR

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 6:41 am

NPR's Don Gonyea normally reports on politics, but he finds other stories along the way, like this one about a touring bluegrass band from the Czech Republic.

The first time I heard Druha Trava play was April 2009. I was covering President Obama's trip to the Europe. There was a big outdoor speech in Prague, and the band was playing Czech versions of Bob Dylan songs.

I did a short radio postcard story back then, figuring it was the kind of experience that every music fan knows: You stumble upon a great band somewhere and never see them again.

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Around the Nation
9:52 am
Tue November 1, 2011

In Florida, Mentally Ill Suffer Abuse And Neglect

Officer Tom Merenda talks to John Fager, one of the dozens of residents living in an assisted-living facility in Cannon Point.
Kenny Malone for NPR

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 4:26 pm

As states have closed down mental hospitals, they've struggled to find housing for the mentally ill. In Florida, assisted-living facilities have become the de facto solution.

It takes just a high school diploma and 26 hours of training to run one of Florida's mental health assisted-living facilities — that's lower than the state requirements for becoming a beautician, a barber or even an auctioneer.

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Fine Art
8:59 am
Thu October 27, 2011

Degas' Nudes Depict The Awkwardness Of Real Life

Many of Degas' nudes have their backs turned to the viewer. Above, Degas' pastel work, After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Neck, 1886-95.
Photo Musee d'Orsay/rmn Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 12:32 pm

The Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the Musee d'Orsay in Paris have two of the world's best collections of the work of the French postimpressionist Edgar Degas. The two museums have collaborated on an important show called Degas and the Nude, which includes pieces from major museums and private collections all over the world. Classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz, who lives in Boston, was moved by the show, which also triggered a sweet personal memory.

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All Tech Considered
9:39 am
Wed October 26, 2011

With The Flick Of A Switch, It's Crystal Clear To Hear

Arielle Schacter, 17, holds her hearing aid in a New York subway station. Hearing loop technology funnels a transit worker's voice into her ear, blocking out the subway noise behind her.
Ashley Milne-Tyte for NPR

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 12:06 am

For the more than 10 percent of Americans who have some form of hearing loss, mass transit can be frustrating, especially on a busy travel weekend like this one. Even if you wear a hearing aid, trying to hear in places like airports, theaters and places of worship can be tough.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:22 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Employers May Not Rush To Drop Health Coverage After All

Despite claims to the contrary, a insightful economic analysis suggests that it wouldn't be in most employers' business interests to stop providing health insurance when the main coverage provisions of the federal health overhaul kick in.

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Asia
12:47 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Boom In Shadow Financing Exacts High Toll In China

At least 80 business owners have abandoned factories like this one in Wenzhou, China's entrepreneurial capital, because they have run up exorbitant debts to the city's loan sharks and underground lenders.

Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 6:26 pm

In recent weeks, at least 80 business owners have fled Wenzhou in eastern China and gone into hiding because they can't pay crushing debts to the city's empire of underground lending firms and loan sharks.

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao became so concerned that he flew to Wenzhou earlier in October to try to keep the problem from spreading.

The city's credit crisis highlights some of the flaws — and potential risks — of the banking system in the world's second-largest economy.

Business Owners Trapped By Debt

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

'A Modest Glimmer Of Hope': Home Prices Up In August

Home prices rose slightly in August, according to the latest data from the S&P/Case-Shiller index. They're still down compared to August 2010, and way down from their pre-recession peak in 2006. But it's good-ish news, reports the AP:

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It's All Politics
11:57 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Rick Perry Offers Flatter Tax In Effort To Regain Traction

Because you can apparently never have enough flat-tax plans in a race for the Republican presidential nomination, Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Tuesday officially introduced his own version.

That gives us two flat tax proposals in the GOP race, Perry's and Herman Cain's (all together now) 9-9-9 plan.

Actually, Perry's plan is not so much a flat tax as a flatter tax since he maintains some deductions and exemptions and even the current tax code for those who would prefer to use it.

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The Salt
11:36 am
Tue October 25, 2011

A DNA Check Reveals Widespread Fish Mislabeling in Massachusetts

Once filleted, it's easy to confuse one white-fleshed fish for another.

iStockphoto.com

Beware Massachusetts fish fans: If you're buying or ordering red snapper, white tuna, local cod or haddock, there's a pretty good chance that's not what you're going to get.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Tue October 25, 2011

World Bank: U.S. Fourth Friendliest Country For Business

The debate over regulation has been in the news lately, because it's been a point of conversation among the 2012 presidential candidates. The Republicans have said that over-regulation has kept businesses from expanding and creating jobs. But a new report from the World Bank that measures business regulation is throwing some cold water on the side that thinks the U.S. is a hostile place for business.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:19 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Key Panel Recommends Routine HPV Vaccination For Boys

If you thought the HPV vaccine against cervical cancer was controversial before, things are just warming up.

A panel of experts that advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on vaccine policies has recommended routine vaccination of 11- and 12-year-old boys with Gardasil, Merck's vaccine against human papillomavirus. Vaccinations could start as early as age 9 and extend to 21-year-old men who weren't previously vaccinated.

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The Two-Way
11:12 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Occupy Wall Street Drummers Generate Loud Debate

The scene on Oct. 10 at one of the Occupy Wall Street drum circles in Manhattan's Zuccotti Park.

Andrew Burton AP

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 11:30 am

"The defining sound of the Occupy Wall Street" protests in Manhattan, as Weekend Edition Sunday's Audie Cornish has said, is "the never-ending drum circle."

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Tue October 25, 2011

WWF: Javan Rhinoceros Extinct In Vietnam

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 12:22 pm

After a year-long survey, the World Wildlife Foundation has come to the conclusion that there are no more rhinoceros left in Vietnam. Specifically, the Javan rhino has disappeared from Cat Tien National Park, one of two of its remaining habitats in the world.

The WWF took dung samples from 2009 to 2010 and through genetic analysis they found the 22 samples belonged to a rhino that was found dead in the national preserve in 2010. That rhino was found with a bullet in its leg and with its horn cut off.

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NPR News Investigations
10:01 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Native Foster Care: Lost Children, Shattered Families

Derrin Yellow Robe, 3, stands in his great-grandparents' backyard on the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. Along with his twin sister and two older sisters, he was taken off the reservation by South Dakota's Department of Social Services in July 2009 and spent a year and a half in foster care before being returned to his family.

John Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu October 27, 2011 10:27 am

Overview of a three-part investigation

Nearly 700 Native American children in South Dakota are being removed from their homes every year, sometimes under questionable circumstances. An NPR News investigation has found that the state is largely failing to place them according to the law. The vast majority of native kids in foster care in South Dakota are in nonnative homes or group homes, according to an NPR analysis of state records.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Perry Unveils His 'Cut, Balance And Grow Plan'

Texas Gov. Rick Perry at last week's Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas.

John Gurzinski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 9:45 am

Saying that it "reorders the way they do business in Washington by reinventing the tax code and restoring our nation to fiscal health through balanced budgets and entitlement reform," Texas Gov. Rick Perry is this hour unveiling his "cut, balance and grow plan" on taxes.

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