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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
4:00 am
Wed October 19, 2011

Spanish, English And Spanglish: Facebook Fans React

A sign spells out Se Habla Espanol (Spanish Spoken Here).

iStockphoto.com

NPR's Morning Edition is exploring bilingual life in the U.S. as the population of Spanish speakers grows. How does the use of English and Spanish affect your life?

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Election 2012
2:00 am
Wed October 19, 2011

Gloves Come Off At GOP Debate In Las Vegas

In Las Vegas, Tuesday night's Republican presidential debate was arguably the hottest show on the Strip.

It was supposed to be a test for businessman Herman Cain, who has gone from nowheresville to competing for the title of front-runner. But Texas Gov. Rick Perry, whose debates and poll numbers have been lackluckster, showed a combative side that had been missing up until now.

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2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.
10:01 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

U.S. Hispanics Choose Churches Outside Catholicism

Natalie Ochoa (left) and her mother, Betty Ochoa, say that services at the New Life Covenant church are less formal than those of the Catholic church they once attended.

Barbara Bradley Hagerty NPR

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 11:21 am

As their numbers grow, Latinos are not only changing where and how they worship; they're also beginning to affect the larger Christian faith.

You can see evidence of that in the Assemblies of God, once a historically white, suburban Pentecostal denomination. When you walk into the denomination's largest church, it's sensory overload: The auditorium is jam-packed with hundreds of Latino worshipers singing in Spanish, swaying and dancing.

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Job 1: Careers That Shaped The GOP Candidates
10:01 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

In White House Run, Cain Counts On Corporate Skill

Herman Cain became a vice president at Pillsbury, left that job and started over at Burger King, where he climbed the corporate ladder again. Eventually, he became CEO of Godfather's Pizza, which he is credited with turning.

Robert Paskach The Omaha World-Herald

Fourth in a series

Herman Cain grew up in Atlanta, graduated from Morehouse College and worked briefly for the Navy. He got a master's degree in computer science and worked in that field at Coca-Cola for a while.

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Middle East
10:01 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Palestinians Try Alternate U.N. Route, Worrying U.S.

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (left) hands over a formal letter for Palestine to be admitted as a state to the U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon during the 66th U.N. General Assembly at the United Nations headquarters in New York, Sept. 23. Now, the Palestinians are pursuing full membership in other U.N. agencies.

Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

With the Palestinian membership bid sitting — and likely going nowhere — in the U.N. Security Council, the Palestinians are trying another route to upgrade their international status.

They are applying for full membership in UNESCO, the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and may do the same with other specialized U.N. agencies.

And that has diplomats at the State Department increasingly concerned about what impact this may have on the U.S. position in the U.N. system.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Revolutionary Oil Skimmer Nets $1 Million X Prize

In a large tank set up to test oil-skimming devices, rows of spinning plastic disks separate oil from water.

Elastec/American Marine

A breakthrough in oil cleanup technology allows crews to skim spilled oil off the water's surface at a much faster rate. The new device wasn't developed by Exxon, BP or any of the major oil companies — it's the work of Elastec/American Marine, based in Illinois. And the design won the company a rich award from the X Prize Foundation.

Oil is attracted to plastic. And water is not. That, in essence, is the basis of Elastec's new skimmer.

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Energy
10:01 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Fight Over Nuclear Plant Draws N.Y. Political Heavies

The nuclear power plant at Indian Point in Buchanan, N.Y., is seen with the Hudson River in the foreground. Gov. Andrew Cuomo's stated resolve to close Indian Point has sparked a debate about the energy outlook for metropolitan New York.

Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 11:21 am

New York's political titans are clashing over the future of a controversial nuclear plant north of New York City.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to close the aging Indian Point nuclear plant because of safety concerns. But the plant, which wants to extend its original licenses for another 20 years, has some powerful allies of its own.

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Sweetness And Light
8:00 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Sometimes, One Is Enough

Bored with a best-of-seven series? Frank Deford has some alternative suggestions.

Paul Giamou iStockphoto.com

Sometimes in sports, like in the rest of life, stuff just hangs around because, well, it's always been there. Such is the best-of-seven game series to determine our champions of professional baseball, basketball and hockey.

A seven-game series is a wretched excess, and I'm going to tell you why, but nobody in charge is going to pay any attention to me because a best-of-seven series has just always been the way of the world.

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Must Watch Video: Quantum Levitation

A levitating puck.

Youtube

This is coolest thing we've seen in a long time:

The video was posted to YouTube two days ago by the Association of Science-Technology Centers and has already garnered 641,230 views. But what is going on here? It's quantum levitation, dude!

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The Two-Way
4:40 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Cain's 9-9-9 Plan Would Cut Taxes For Millionaires; Raise Them For Poor

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain campaigns on Oct. 15 in Cookeville, Tenn.

Mark Humphrey AP

The first detailed analysis of Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain's 9-9-9 tax plan found that it would cut taxes for Americans making $200,000 or more a year and raise taxes for those making less than $200,000 a year.

The analysis was released today by the independent Tax Policy Center, a joint venture by the Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Hamas Official: Prisoner Swap Was Victory For All Palestinians

In two interviews, today, NPR's Robert Siegel got reaction from Hamas and the Israeli government over a prisoner swap deal that freed Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit and 1,027 Palestinian prisoners.

When Robert asked Osama Hamdan, a senior official from the Hamas international relations department, what the deal meant for future relations between Hamas and Israel, Hamdan said it "depends on the Israeli side."

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

'The Sense Of An Ending' By Julian Barnes Awarded Booker Prize

Julian Barnes is the author of Metroland, Flaubert's Parrot and England, England.

Alan Edwards Knopf

Judges announced that Julian Barnes' The Sense Of An Ending was awarded the 2011 Man Booker Prize. The Leicester-born Barnes was a Booker finalist three times before: in 1984 for his novel Flaubert's Parrot; in 1998 for England, England and in 2005 for Arthur and George

The AP reports:

Judges announced the winner of the 50,000 pound ($82,000) prize Tuesday at a ceremony in London.

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It's All Politics
2:41 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

What Word Comes To Mind When You Think Of The GOP Candidates?

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 3:17 pm

How to explain Herman Cain's ascent among Republican presidential candidates?

Perhaps a partial reason is that he so far evokes more positive than negative responses among Republicans and GOP leaning independents in a Pew Research Center/Washington Post survey than two other highly touted candidates in the race, Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:35 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

When It Comes To Baby's Crib, Experts Say Go Bare Bones

A pediatrician says parents often mistakenly believe all baby accessories are safe.

iStockphoto.com

No more blankets in the baby's bed. Not even when it's cold outside. No bumpers, pillows, or toys. All these accoutrements are hazards for newborns and infants, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, which has released new expanded guidelines for reducing deaths from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS, and other causes including suffocation, entrapment and asphyxia.

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Business
2:13 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Cultivating A Wine Market In N.Y.'s Finger Lakes

Grapes hang in a vineyard overlooking Canandaigua Lake in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York.

Randall Tagg AP

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 3:50 pm

New York's Finger Lakes region is named for its 11 long, thin lakes that run north to south below Lake Ontario. As it turns out, the hills surrounding these lakes are fertile ground for grapes, and the region is starting to gain recognition for its wines.

But because of the nature of marketing and selling new wines, it's still pretty tough to buy a bottle from the Finger Lakes region.

The area does have a long history of growing grapes: There have been wild grapes there for untold centuries. The vines are hardy and able to withstand occasional subzero temperatures.

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Middle East
1:31 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Freed Israeli Soldier Seeks Return To 'Quiet Life'

Released Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit (second from right), walks with Israeli Defense Minster Ehud Barak (left), Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (second from left) and Israeli Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz, at the Tel Nof Air base in southern Israel on Tuesday. Shalit was freed after more than five years of captivity in the Gaza Strip.

Israel Defense Ministry AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:19 am

In a dramatic day that took him from captivity in the Gaza Strip to his home village in northern Israel, soldier Gilad Shalit was freed Tuesday after more than five years as a prisoner of Palestinian militants.

His release was cause for celebration in Israel, and nowhere more so than in Mitzpe Hila, where he was welcomed by several hundred neighbors and close friends who had long pressed for his release.

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Sports
1:06 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Analysts Point To Several Factors In Wheldon's Death

When the race cars began to collide Sunday on the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Dr. Terry Trammell immediately muted his television. He watched in silence to focus on the signs of injury based on car positions and how the safety crew was responding. When he saw the helicopter arrive, he knew that someone was severely injured. Dan Wheldon, a two-time Indianapolis 500 winner, was pronounced dead two hours later.

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Latin America
1:01 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

In Mexico, Tourism Survives Bloody Drug War

Mexico has launched a publicity blitz to attract more tourists. The vast majority of tourists travel to just one of a half-dozen destinations in Mexico — including Cancun, shown here last year — far from the drug violence.

Gustavo Graf Bloomberg via Getty Images

Yes, the drug war has created an image problem. But Mexico has launched an aggressive publicity blitz to try to attract more tourists, and it seems to be succeeding.

Even President Felipe Calderon is involved in the full court press to tout the wonders, delicacies and marvels of Mexico to potential visitors.

On the PBS program The Royal Tour of Mexico, Calderon serves as the on-camera guide for TV host Peter Greenberg. The president leads a zip-line tour across a rain forest, rappels into a cave, climbs Mayan ruins and snorkels along a coral reef.

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It's All Politics
12:57 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

GOP Las Vegas Debate Finds Focus On Cain As Romney Cruises

Mitt Romney and Nevada Lt. Gov. Brian Krolicki (r) take photos with supporters as Romney opens his state headquarters in Las Vegas, October 17, 2011.

Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 6:09 pm

As Republican presidential candidates gird for their eighth debate, this one in Las Vegas, Nev., Tuesday evening, a central question is: how will the Herman Cain phenomenon shape the event?

With the one-time pizza company CEO near or at the top of the GOP field depending on which poll you consult, he's likely to draw more attention from the other candidates at the debate than was true in any of their previous meetings. The two-hour debate will be carried by CNN at 8 pm ET.

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The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Police: BlackBerry Outage Led To Fewer Traffic Accidents In Abu Dhabi

Damien Meyer AFP/Getty Images

As Mark has reported, BlackBerry users faced a text messaging outage for three days straight last week. Yesterday, BlackBerry offered some customers $100 in free apps as an apology.

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U.S.
12:09 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Maine Strained By Use Of Cocaine-Like 'Bath Salts'

Although Shane Heathers was warned about the dangers of using synthetic stimulants known as bath salts, he said he wanted to try the drug anyway. He injected it day and night for a week before he ended up at the hospital. Several more bath salts binges followed.

Jay Field for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 8:48 pm

States across the country continue to fight the spread of a dangerous new drug: bath salts.

They aren't anything like those soothing crystals you pour into the tub — they're synthetic stimulants, so-called designer drugs that cause paranoid, psychotic, often violent behavior in users.

Bath salts can still be purchased legally in some states and, in some cases, over the Internet.

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Law
12:01 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

Businesses Push Back On Foreign Bribery Law

One of the federal government's few success stories when it comes to policing corporate crime in recent years comes from a post-Watergate law called the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA.

Prosecutors have used the law to get more than $1 billion in bribery fines out of huge companies like Siemens and DaimlerChrysler.

But now the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is pushing back: It has hired former Justice Department leaders to make the case that the law is out of date.

Critics: Law Has Huge Consequences

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The Two-Way
11:46 am
Tue October 18, 2011

Policy Reversed: Marines May Wear 'KIA Bracelets' Honoring The Fallen

Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Nolen, a corpsman with Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, wears a memorial bracelet or KIA (killed in action) bracelet in honor of his fallen squad leader Cpl. Michael W. Ouellette, who was killed during a patrol in Afghanistan.

Sgt. Michael S. Cifuentes marines.mil

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 12:10 pm

"The Marine Corps is ending its controversial ban on bracelets honoring U.S. troops killed in combat," Marine Corps Times is reporting.

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The Two-Way
11:42 am
Tue October 18, 2011

For The First Time, 50 Percent Of Americans Say U.S. Should Legalize Pot

Gallup

Since Gallup started asking Americans in 1969 whether use of marijuana should be legal, most have said no. But in a Gallup poll released yesterday, half of Americans said the government should legalize pot use.

That is a record high.

Here's Gallup's historical chart for the question:

And here's how they characterize the shift in public opinion:

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Politics
11:32 am
Tue October 18, 2011

Obama Takes Aim At Republican Jobs Plan

President Obama speaks at a YMCA in Jamestown, N.C., on Tuesday, during a three-day bus tour to promote his American Jobs Act. During the trip, he has drawn sharp lines between his jobs plan and the competing Republican plan.

Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 4:51 pm

President Obama's bus tour rolled into Virginia on Tuesday afternoon, after a day and a half in North Carolina.

The president has been using the tour to promote his jobs plan and to criticize an alternative plan put forward by Senate Republicans.

Another Day, Another Diner

Earlier Tuesday, the president stopped at Reid's House Restaurant in Reidsville, N.C., bypassing the special — spaghetti and Texas toast — in favor of a cheeseburger and sweet tea.

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The Two-Way
11:12 am
Tue October 18, 2011

VIDEO: Lubbock Goes Dark As Dust Storm Swallows City

As we've seen before this year, when a "haboob" rolls over a city the results can be awesome — and not in a good way if you're caught in it.

Monday afternoon in Lubbock, Texas, a massive dust storm turned day into night in less than a minute. Check this video from local TV station KLBK and The Associated Press (which loops once).

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Shots - Health Blog
11:06 am
Tue October 18, 2011

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Slashes Infection Risk By Half

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 1:33 pm

After decades of disappointment, researchers think they're finally on track to unleash the first practical vaccine against malaria, one of mankind's ancient scourges.

In the world's first large field trial of an experimental malaria vaccine, several thousand young children who got three doses had about 55 percent less risk of getting the disease over a year than those who got a control vaccine against rabies or meningitis.

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Tue October 18, 2011

Goldman Sachs Lost $428 Million In Third Quarter

Bank of America's report of a $6.2 billion profit in the third quarter, as we said earlier, has many analysts pointing out that it was mostly due to one-time accounting changes and asset sales. Still, BofA's stock is up slightly at this hour.

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The Salt
9:09 am
Tue October 18, 2011

Curbing Cooking Smoke That Kills More People Than Malaria

Environmental hazards sicken or kill millions of people — soot or smog in the air, for example, or pollutants in drinking water. But the most dangerous stuff happens where the food is made — in peoples' kitchens.

That's according to the World Health Organization, which says that the smoke and gases from cooking fires in the world's poorest countries contribute to nearly two million deaths a year — that's more than malaria.

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All Tech Considered
9:09 am
Tue October 18, 2011

DeLorean Goes Electric: Company Plans New Model Of Iconic Gullwing Car

A 1981 DeLorean is seen in a commemorative cruise in Michigan. A Texas company plans to make electric versions of the iconic car.

Jerry S. Mendoza AP

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 10:12 am

There's a new DeLorean DMC-12 coming out — or rather, there's a new version of the same stainless steel wedge of a sportscar that became an icon (and perhaps the lone representative) of '80s cool. But it won't run on gas — it'll be electric.

And unlike the DeLorean that played a vital role in Back to the Future, this one won't require a nuclear reaction that generates 1.21 gigawatts.

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