NPR News

Pages

Shots - Health Blog
12:22 pm
Wed September 14, 2011

CDC Basks In 'Contagion's' Admiring Take On Disease Detectives

Laurence Fishburne as Dr. Ellis Cheever and Kate Winslet as Dr. Erin Mears in the thriller Contagion. Winslet's character was modeled on CDC epidemiologist Dr. Anne Schuchat.
Claudette Barius Warner Bro. Pictures

It's not often that a federal health agency gets to toot its horn about its portrayal in a Hollywood thriller. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention took full advantage of the opportunity Tuesday, on the heels of the release of Contagion, a feature film about a deadly global pandemic and the public health workers who try to stop it.

Read more
Planet Money
12:15 pm
Wed September 14, 2011

A Slow-Motion Bank Run In Europe

MICHEL GANGNE AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 9:39 am

Update: This post was published on Sept. 14. On Sept. 15, the European Central Bank, along with other central banks from around the world, announced a new lending program to fight the slow-motion run on Europe's banks. Here's more on that program.

Read more
Europe
12:14 pm
Wed September 14, 2011

For U.S. And Russia, Distrust Still Runs High

President Obama meets with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on the sidelines of the G8 summit in Deauville, France, on May 26. Obama's "reset" policy with Russia led to improved relations, but the countries are now facing some difficult issues.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

President Obama's policy of engagement with Russia has paid off in several concrete achievements, including a nuclear arms control agreement and greater cooperation on Iran and Afghanistan.

But both supporters and critics of the so-called reset policy worry that further victories will be harder to win.

Both nations are distracted by presidential politics, preventing policymakers from talking seriously about matters such as missile defense.

Read more
Asia
12:07 pm
Wed September 14, 2011

Mentally Ill In Indonesia Still Live In Chains

Nengah, 35, suffers from schizophrenia. Until recently, her family on Bali in Indonesia kept her chained to a concrete pit for nearly a decade.
Cokorda Bagus Jaya Lesmana Courtesy of GlobalPost

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 12:36 pm

The harsh, tropical sunlight that dapples Bali's tourist-thronged beaches streams through the fingers of a palm leaf and lands on the shoulders of Nengah, who slumps like a rag doll amid a pile of tattered pillows in the island's far eastern reaches.

The poor village of Abang is remote, and Nengah spends her days in a heap, staring at hands that lie in her lap like dry leaves.

Today, Nengah is not alone. Neighbors have gathered in the mid-July heat to watch as her brother uses a stone to break a chain that has bound her to a concrete pit — her home — for nearly a decade.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Wed September 14, 2011

NASA Unveils Next Generation 'Monster' Space Rocket

Artist concept of SLS launching.
NASA

If things go without a hitch NASA announced that its new Space Launch System could take its first manned test flight in 2017.

The new design looks a lot like the Apollo era rockets that took American astronauts to the moon, but NASA said the new spacecraft is much more powerful than any other rocket they've made before and could set up astronauts for deep space exploration. The SLS will be NASA's first exploration-calss vehicle since the Saturn V took astronauts to the moon.

At the unveiling of the plans Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) called it a "monster rocket."

Read more
Afghanistan
11:32 am
Wed September 14, 2011

As Wars Drag On, U.S. Interest Wanes

Darryl St. George, a Navy corpsman, walks along a mud compound wall in Helmand province, southern Afghanistan. Next month will mark 10 years for U.S. forces in Afghanistan.
David Gilkey NPR

When U.S. forces launched the war in Afghanistan on Oct. 7, 2001, they were riding a wave of anger and a call for justice by a broad swath of the American public.

Andrew Kohut, president of the Pew Research Center, says the initial support for the Afghan invasion was around 90 percent, and the war was closely followed by a large number of people. But since then, the public has been slowly disengaging, he says.

Read more
It's All Politics
11:23 am
Wed September 14, 2011

White House's Haste On Solar Firm Loan Creates Political Headaches

While there are still many open questions, some things are more certain in the sorry tale of Solyndra, the now bankrupt solar-cell manufacturer President Obama once praised as a model for the nation's renewable energy future.

One, U.S. taxpayers will take a loss on their $535 million federal loan guarantee that was part of the stimulus program.

Two, 1,100 workers have been laid off.

Three, the Federal Bureau of Investigation last week raided Solyndra's offices.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:10 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Cats That Glow For AIDS Research Join List Of Animals That Shine

Glowing for science.
Mayo Clinic

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 11:12 am

A story that's been getting some attention the past day or so — that AIDS researchers at the Mayo Clinic have inserted genes into cats that make the animals glow green in the dark — sounded familiar.

Haven't researchers been doing this sort of thing for years? We wondered.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:53 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Class Of 2011 Reading Scores On SAT Fall To Lowest Level On Record

At first glance this bit of news from the AP seems a foreboding sign for the future of the country:

Scores on the critical reading portion of the SAT college entrance exam fell three points to their lowest level on record last year, and combined reading and math scores reached their lowest point since 1995.

Read more
Business
10:00 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Herman Cain Talks Jobs, 'Atrocious' Poverty Rate

Republican presidential candidate businessman Herman Cain gives the thumbs up during a break in a Republican presidential debate Monday, Sept. 12, 2011, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Mike Carlson)
Mike Carlson AP

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 10:03 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, Host:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to spend a good deal of time today talking about money, how much the government has to spend and how much and how little many American families have. Later we're going to talk about that special Congressional Committee that's been charged with coming up with a plan to take a big bite out of the federal deficit. That group held it's first public hearing on Tuesday.

Read more
Economy
10:00 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Former Biden Advisor Critical Of Cain's Jobs Plan

For another perspective on combating the increase in poverty, Tell Me More turns to Jared Bernstein. He served in the Obama administration as Chief Economist and Economic Adviser to Vice President Joe Biden. He responds to Herman Cain's 999 plan and identifies the impediments of getting Americans back to work.

Economy
10:00 am
Wed September 14, 2011

'Civil, Sober' Super Committee Gets To Work

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 8:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, Host:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, it's an article of faith that parents are going to try to work hard and sacrifice so they can leave something to their kids. But a new survey shows that that's less and less the case for millionaire baby boomers. We'll hear more about that in just a few minutes. That's this week's Money Coach conversation.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
9:28 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Fear of Antidepressants Leads People To Shun Treatment

As common as antidepressant use has become, many depressed people still fear treatment.
Amanda M Hatfield Flickr

Antidepressants are the second-most-prescribed drug in the U.S., making them seem about as common as Pez candy.

Read more
Around the Nation
9:16 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Is Walmart A Magnet For American Mayhem?

In virtually every county, there is a Walmart open every hour of every day and every one of those Walmarts is being visited by 37,000 people a week — that's 220 people an hour, in every Walmart every hour of the day. Here a Walmart worker pulls carts at a store in Pittsburg, Calif. on June 20.
Paul Sakuma AP

Dispatches from the field: A customer was nabbed by police for sampling raw meat at a Walmart in Pennsylvania. A woman said she had an encounter with a bat at a Walmart in Minnesota. A family of five was living in a car at a Walmart in Florida.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:00 am
Wed September 14, 2011

'Wi-Fi Refugees' Are Moving To West Virginia To Escape Radio Waves

"Dozens of Americans who claim to have been made ill by Wi-Fi and mobile phones have flocked to the town of Green Bank, W.Va.," the BBC reports.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:25 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Gulf Spill Blamed On Poor Management, Bad Cement Job, Other Missteps

"A key federal report blames poor management, key missteps and a faulty cement job by BP and others for the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history and the deaths of 11 rig workers," The Associated Press reports.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:15 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Report: White House 'Tried To Rush' Decision On Solar Firm Loan

May 26, 2010: President Obama tours the Solyndra solar panel company with Executive VP of Engineering Ben Bierman.
Pool Getty Images

One of the scoops of the day, from The Washington Post:

"The Obama White House tried to rush federal reviewers for a decision on a nearly half-billion-dollar loan to the solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra so Vice President Biden could announce the approval at a September 2009 groundbreaking for the company's factory, newly obtained e-mails show."

Read more
It's All Politics
6:51 am
Wed September 14, 2011

GOP's Bob Turner Wins Weiner's House Seat In N.Y. Upset

Republicans had reasons to cheer and Democrats to despair Wednesday with the upset special election victory in New York City of a Republican retired businessman who will complete the congressional term of Anthony Weiner, the Democrat who exited the U.S. House because of a sexting scandal.

Bob Turner, a 70-year old former cable television executive, beat David Weprin, a 55-year old, state assemblyman, in a district which had, until Tuesday, been reliably Democratic for nearly 100 years.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:38 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Retail Sales And Wholesale Prices Unchanged In August

A sharp drop in energy costs helped keep prices at the wholesale level unchanged in August vs. July, the Bureau of Labor Statistics just reported.

According to BLS, while food costs went up 1.1 percent, energy costs fell 1 percent.

Still, over the 13 months ended Aug. 31 the producer price index rose 6.5 percent, BLS added.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:10 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Release Of American Hikers Not Imminent, Iran's Judiciary Says

The limits of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's authority appear to be showing again with word from that country's official news outlet that:

"Iran's Judiciary has rejected recent media reports on the imminent release of the two American nationals that were convicted of spying on behalf of the United States."

Read more
The Two-Way
5:55 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Democrats Suffer 'Demoralizing' Defeats In New York And Nevada

"Republicans pulled off an upset in Tuesday's special election in New York City to replace former congressman Anthony Weiner," NPR's Joel Rose reports. "Bob Turner claimed victory over Democrat David Weprin."

Read more
The Two-Way
5:30 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Inside Kabul Siege Site:Attackers' Bodies, Walls Riddled With Bullet Holes

Afghan Security personnel stand above the body of one attacker, on the 10th floor of the building in Kabul from which RPGs and other weapons were fired.
David Gilkey NPR

An attack on the U.S. embassy and other buildings in the heart of Kabul's diplomatic district that lasted 20 hours is now over.

Read more
Animals
2:50 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Born To Prey: Watch T. Rex Come Alive

Kent Stevens & Scott Ernst University of Oregon/Vizme

Tyrannosaurus rex roamed the Earth some 65 million years ago. In the century since the first skeleton was unearthed in Montana, our understanding of how the giant predator lived, moved and behaved has evolved. Watch the videos below to see the latest T. rex research in motion.

Read more
Conflict In Libya
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Freedoms Flourish On Walls Across Tripoli

Caricatures of the ousted Gadhafi have sprung up all over Tripoli. This image of Gadhafi in chains is on a wall in the capital's Fashlum neighborhood.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 6:14 pm

In Tripoli, residents are painting the town red, green and black, the new colors of the Libyan revolution.

Under Moammar Gadhafi, the regime strictly controlled the images that were allowed in public. Storefronts had to be painted green. English was banned on signs. Anti-regime graffiti was quickly painted over and could be met with a harsh response.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

The NCAA And The So-Called 'Student-Athlete'

The NCAA lost control of college football contracts in the 1980s, forcing it to rely on fees paid to broadcast its annual basketball tournament. Here, CBS broadcasters Jim Nantz, left, and Clark Kellogg interview North Carolina coach Roy Williams and player Ty Lawson after a 2009 game.
Joe Murphy Getty Images

Sports fans love to designate certain games as "the greatest ever," the "match of the century" and so forth. Well, I would like to state that a piece in the October issue of The Atlantic Monthly, which was released online Tuesday, may well be the most important article ever written about college sports.

Read more
Animals
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Bone To Pick: First T. Rex Skeleton, Complete At Last

Watch the videos here to see how T. rex walked." href="/post/bone-pick-first-t-rex-skeleton-complete-last" class="noexit lightbox">
When the T. rex skeleton was first put on display, it was presented standing vertically, in this Godzilla-like pose, as seen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History around 1950. Recent studies show the dinosaur actually kept its body horizontal. Watch the videos here to see how T. rex walked.
Carnegie Museum of Natural History

The back rooms of museums are like your grandparents' attic, only the stuff is more exotic — things like fossilized jellyfish, dinosaur eggs, or mummified princes.

And if you look carefully, you'll find objects that once changed science but are now largely forgotten. You might call them Lost Treasures of Science. This is a story of one of those objects — a special bone that's part of a special skeleton.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Fatal Car Crashes Drop For 16-Year-Olds, Rise For Older Teens

Richard Meehan, 16, with his car at his home in Shelton, Conn in 2008. Researchers say tougher licensing laws have led to fewer fatal car crashes involving 16-year-old drivers.
Bob Child ASSOCIATED PRESS

Terrified to see your teenager behind the wheel? You're not alone. But a new study finds tougher state licensing laws have led to a decrease in fatal accidents, at least among 16-year-olds. That's the good news.

Read more
Politics
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

GOP Opposes Obama Call To Pay For Jobs With Taxes

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 1:21 pm

Republicans aren't exactly crazy about the public works spending President Obama proposes in his $447 billion jobs bill sent to Congress this week, but they are even less enamored with how the president wants to pay for it: by ending a slew of tax breaks for wealthy individuals and corporations.

Read more
Middle East
10:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Palestinians Seek To End Stalemate With U.N. Bid

As the Palestinians plan to make a bid for statehood at the United Nations next week, many Palestinians see it as a way to break years of deadlock with Israel.

The Israelis, meanwhile, see only diplomatic fallout and the potential for violence.

For Palestinians, the U.N. plan is loaded with symbolism. The central post office in the Palestinian city of Ramallah is issuing a series of commemorative stamps and postcards this month. For the first time, they will identify the country of origin as Palestine.

Read more

Pages