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Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know
10:46 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

An American Rebellion, Sparked By Tough Times

An engraved illustration of fighting during Shays' Rebellion of 1786, circa 1850.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A war is ending and economic times are tough. Taxes are high and property foreclosures common. Streets are filled with protesters. Sounds familiar, I know, but I'm not talking about today's news.

It was the Revolutionary War, winding down in 1783, and the national government was massively in debt and having enormous difficulty paying the soldiers who had fought the war.

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The Two-Way
3:29 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

Some New Yorkers Look On Irene's Bright Side

People stand in line at a Trader Joe's Wine Shop in Manhattan Friday, ahead of Hurricane Irene's arrival in New York City this weekend.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Parts of New York City are under evacuation orders, with more than 370,000 people ordered to leave low-lying areas as Hurricane Irene approaches the city. But on Saturday afternoon, at least, some residents were making the most of it.

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Science
3:25 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

Is Steve Jobs One Of America's Great Innovators?

Steve Jobs, the now-former CEO of Apple, holds up an iPhone at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco in June 2010. Jobs announced on Wednesday that he would be resigning as CEO of Apple.
Paul Sakuma AP

Steve Jobs stepped down this week as CEO of Apple after running the company for nearly 25 years.

The very first Macintosh computer, the iPod audio player and most recently the iPad are just a few of the products Jobs has created that have changed the way millions of people live their lives.

As one of the great American innovators in recent years, comparisons can be drawn between Jobs and other great innovators like Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, both technological titans of American History.

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Africa
2:01 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

Humanitarian Situation In Tripoli Increasingly Dire

Though rebels have consolidated control over Tripoli, life in the Libyan capital grows more difficult by the day. Residents scramble just to get basic supplies, such as food and water.

The city's tap water normally comes from what Moammar Gadhafi touted as the "Eighth Wonder of the World," the Great Man-Made River. The system channels water from deep wells in the desert to Tripoli and other parts of Western Libya.

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

More Than 9,000 Flights Cancelled Due To Irene

Hurricane Irene has forced airlines to cancel more than 9,000 flights this weekend, with the AP reporting 3,600 cancellations on Saturday.

United Continental and Delta Air Lines, two of America's largest airlines, have each announced thousands of cancellations for the period between Saturday and Monday. International carriers, such as British Airways, have also cancelled flights to the U.S. East Coast that were scheduled for late Saturday or Sunday.

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Around the Nation
12:40 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

El Paso Weathers Drought, Thanks To Lawn Policy

For decades, the city of El Paso, in far West Texas, defied the look of most desert communities, with neighborhoods boasting lush, green lawns and residents freely running their sprinklers.

Then a study came out in 1979 that showed just how close El Paso was to a crisis: At its rate of water use, the city would run dry within 36 years.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Sat August 27, 2011

N.J. Gov. To Senior Citizens: Please Get On The Buses And Leave

"I can't make you ... I'm not going to arrest you."

But please, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) just told 600 senior citizens who live in Atlantic City: Let the state evacuate you before Hurricane Irene slams into the high-rise buildings where you live.

The residents have so far refused to leave.

Christie said the state is going to send buses to the seniors' buildings in the hopes they can be convinced to go to inland shelters.

"Let us walk you downstairs and put you on those buses," he added.

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World
11:40 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Is Libya The First 'True Arab Revolution?'

The Libyan rebels' takeover of Tripoli may be a landmark of the movement known as the Arab Spring, but does it qualify as a revolution?

James DeFronzo, author of the book Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements, thinks it's still too early to tell.

"You have to have some great structural, institutional change for an uprising to eventually be legitimately called a revolution," he tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan.

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Africa
11:23 am
Sat August 27, 2011

U.S. Aids Hunt For Gadhafi, Drawing On Iraq Lesson

A bullet-riddled mural portrait of Moammar Gadhafi sits on a wall in Tripoli. Libyan rebels are looking for the former leader, aided by foreign intelligence services and U.S. spy drones.
Francois Mori AP

It took a U.S.-led invasion force of more than 200,000 troops nine months to scour Iraq's nearly 170,000 square miles before they captured Saddam Hussein, in one of the largest manhunts ever.

Now, Moammar Gadhafi is on the run in Libya — but chasing after him is a much smaller and less well-equipped force of Libyan rebels. They're trying to track down a fugitive who, like Saddam, is well-armed, well-funded and capable of winning popular support and sowing instability simply by evading his pursuers.

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Africa
11:11 am
Sat August 27, 2011

In Libya, Gas Prices Rise As Rebels Seek Control

Rebel supporters burn books on the philosophy of Gadhafi in Tripoli on Saturday. Libyan rebel leaders say they're negotiating with regime loyalists in holdout towns.
Sergey Ponomarev AP

Originally published on Sat August 27, 2011 12:07 pm

Libyan rebels fought to gain control of a major supply road to Tripoli on Saturday, seizing a border crossing with Tunisia and strengthening their hold on the oil-rich country as they hunt for Moammar Gadhafi.

Controlling the road from the Tunisian border to the capital would help ease growing shortages of fuel and food, particularly in the battle-scarred city.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

First Irene-Related Deaths Reported

The first deaths in the U.S. related to Hurricane Irene to be reported come from North Carolina.

The Raleigh News & Observer writes that:

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Around the Nation
9:52 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Insurers Prepare For Flood Of Claims From Irene

Chris Pittman (left) and Frank Eckel board up a storefront in Cape May, N.J., in anticipation of Hurricane Irene.
William Thomas Cain Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:29 am

As Hurricane Irene makes its way north, insurance companies are scrambling to get claims adjusters and other personnel in place up and down the East Coast and into New England.

Companies will be assessing the damage once Irene is through battering the northeastern states. If the hurricane hits as wide an area as is predicted, insured losses could be in the billions of dollars.

On the boardwalk of Ocean City, Md., Tony Russo Jr. is boarding up the windows of his family's restaurant, Tony's Pizza.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Mayor Bloomberg On Evacuations: 'You Have To Start Right Now'

Earlier today, a man pulled his luggage up Wall Street — one of the low-lying areas — in Manhattan.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Hoping to convince anyone who is ignoring the mandatory evacuation orders for those living in New York City's low-lying areas, Mayor Michael Bloomberg just warned that if anyone hasn't already moved to higher ground, "you have to start right now."

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Africa
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Libyan Rebels Plan Rule, Prepare Final Assault

Originally published on Sat August 27, 2011 8:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Scott Simon. Libyan rebels say they've secured most of Tripoli and taken a key border crossing to Tunisia. That crossing is vital to getting food and supplies into the Libyan capital where the human situation is growing dire. Members of the rebel council in Benghazi say they're relocating to Tripoli where they will set up an interim government that will rule Libya into 2012. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. Soraya, thanks for being with us.

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Economy
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Obama Considers New Solutions For The Housing Market

The Obama administration is considering several new ideas to help shore up the struggling housing market. As first reported by The New York Times this week, one proposal would allow homeowners with government-backed mortgages to refinance them at the current, lower interest rates. Host Scott Simon talks with Columbia University's Christopher Mayer, who helped introduce the mortgage refinancing proposal in 2008.

Politics
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Disloyalty Charges Threaten N.H. GOP Chair

Presidential candidates aren't the only Republicans jockeying for position in the state that holds the first presidential primary. Jack Kimball, New Hampshire's GOP chairman, is fighting to remain in office. The Tea Party-backed newcomer was elected to lead state Republicans just seven months ago. He now faces removal amid charges of incompetence and disloyalty. New Hampshire Public Radio's Josh Rogers reports.

Race
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

One Man's Moment With Martin Luther King Jr.

The memorial to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., opened on the National Mall this week. NPR's Ari Shapiro introduces us to one man for whom this moment caps a long family story.

Sports
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Persistence Pays Off: 60-Year-Old Swims Channel

You know the old adage, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again?" Well, Pat Gallant-Charette certainly does. Last Monday, on her third attempt since 2008, the 60-year-old from Westbrook, Maine, swam across the English Channel in less than 16 hours. Host Scott Simon talks with Gallant-Charette, who is now the oldest American woman to swim the English Channel.

Sports
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Sports: Dim Stars At U.S. Open; MLB Pennant Races

The bright lights and raucous crowds of the U.S. Open are here, but this year, the talent isn't shining. In baseball, the front-runners are pulling ahead of the also-running, just before the last month of the season. Host Scott Simon talks sports with Howard Bryant of ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Hurricane Irene Crashes Into East Coast

Originally published on Sat August 27, 2011 8:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Hurricane Irene has arrived. The storm has already struck parts of North Carolina. Some 200,000 people there are without power. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano urged caution as Irene moves up the East Coast.

Secretary JANET NAPOLITANO (HOMELAND SECURITY): Irene remains a large and dangerous storm. People need to take it seriously, people need to be prepared.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Hurricane Irene's Power Is Less, Scope Is Wide

Hurricane Irene has reached the coast of North Carolina, bringing heavy rains and winds of 85 miles per hour. But there IS some good news. The storm is turning out to be less powerful than forecasters expected. Host Scott Simon talks with NPR science reporter John Hamilton about the latest on Hurricane Irene.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

New York Scrambles To Safety As Irene Nears

Originally published on Sat August 27, 2011 8:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: New York City officials have ordered the mandatory evacuation of roughly 370,000 people who live in low-lying areas of the city. Mayor Michael Bloomberg says that everybody living there should be gone by 5 pm today.

MICHAEL BLOOMBERG: Now, we've never done a mandatory evacuation before and we wouldn't be doing it now if we didn't think this storm had the potential to be very serious.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Hurricane Flattens Business For OBX Pancake House

As Hurricane Irene swirls toward the North Carolina coast, many local business owners are despairing the loss of business during their busy season. Host Scott Simon checks in with Steve and Kristine Kiousis, who own the pancake house, Stack 'Em High, in Kitty Hawk, N.C.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

New Jersey Shore Empties Ahead Of Irene

On the New Jersey Shore, officials have ordered mandatory evacuations and residents are preparing for the onslaught of Hurricane Irene. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

Economy
6:00 am
Sat August 27, 2011

A Prescription For The Bedridden Economy

At an annual economic symposium in Jackson Hole this week, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke offered an upbeat assessment about the country's long-term prospects for economic growth. NPR's Scott Horsley talked with officials and academics at the symposium about economic growth in tight fiscal times.

The Two-Way
4:30 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Irene Starts Bashing East Coast

Wind blows against palm trees on a beach in Ocean City, Md., on Saturday.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:29 am

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Mitt Romney
4:14 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Can Romney Stay The Course As The CEO Candidate?

Mitt Romney's national front-runner status in the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination took a hit this week, with national polls showing that he has been eclipsed by Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

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Science
3:37 am
Sat August 27, 2011

At New Madrid Fault, Shaky Guesses On Next Quake

The New Madrid earthquakes broke up rock like this section of rock face, which was later filled with sand. This photo, from Mississippi County, Mo., was taken in 1904.
M.L. Fuller (Image 336) USGS

Originally published on Sat August 27, 2011 8:53 am

The magnitude-5.8 earthquake that rattled the eastern U.S. on Tuesday took everyone — even geologists — by surprise. But even when there are reasons to think an earthquake could be around the corner, scientists still can't make good predictions.

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Around the Nation
3:15 am
Sat August 27, 2011

Joplin Debris 'Reborn' In Kansas City Art Project

A crowd previews a selection of art from the Reclamation Project, which has reused debris from the tornado in Joplin, Miss.
Leedy-Voulkos Art Center.

Pieces of twisted metal and scrap wood left behind by a massive tornado that tore through Joplin, Miss., are now sitting in a gallery in Kansas City. The sculptures and paintings from the wreckage are to be sold at auction Saturday.

Ann Leach is a grief counselor who has lived in Joplin for 14 years. She's one of the survivors of the May tornado, which left 159 people dead. When the tornado struck, Leach was protected by a slab of sheet rock that fell on top of her, forming a protective barrier.

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Fri August 26, 2011

2,400 Flights Cancelled Ahead Of Hurricane Irene

Originally published on Fri August 26, 2011 4:17 pm

Irene is already causing travel headaches: Airlines have cancelled 2,400 flights so far. As it works up its way through the East Coast of the United States, Bloomberg reports, it is forecast to move through busiest airspace in the country.

That means: Delta has cancelled 1,300 flights; Jet Blue will drop 75 percent of its weekend trips; American Airlines is planning to scrap 265 flights.

Bloomberg adds:

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