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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:20 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Ashcroft: War On Terror Won 'One Day At A Time'

Former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft speaks at the Heritage Foundation in 2010 in Washington, DC. Ashcroft spoke about the U.S. Supreme Court's second opportunity to review the rights of Guantanamo detainees.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

John Ashcroft's term as attorney general under George W. Bush was redefined by Sept. 11.

And he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that the techniques endorsed by his Justice Department were necessary, from warrantless wiretaps to so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques."

Defending The Patriot Act

One of Ashcroft's most controversial legacies is the Patriot Act, a piece of legislation that dramatically expanded the surveillance capabilities of law enforcement for monitoring terrorism suspects.

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The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

Honoring The Four-Legged Heroes

Susannah George NPR

NPR's Joel Rose was in New Jersey today, where he stumbled upon another Sept. 11 tribute:

A different breed of heroes from September 11th gathered across the Hudson River from Ground Zero. Dozens of service and therapy dogs from around the country gathered with their handlers at Liberty State Park. The event, billed as "Finding One Another," was intended to celebrate the contributions of search and rescue dogs on 9/11 and since.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Sun September 11, 2011

VIDEOS: Reading Of The Names, Remembering Those Lost

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 5:39 am

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Lincoln Letter Read By Bush Has Raised Questions Over Years

Though it is widely recognized as "one of the finest pieces of American presidential prose," as The Associated Press wrote in 2008, the "Bixby Letter" that President George W. Bush read this morning during the Sept. 11 memorial service in New York City has been the subject of several questions over the years.

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Africa
9:49 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Rebels Face Resistance From Pro-Gadhafi Forces

A Libyan National Transitional Council fighter keeps watch from atop his rocket launcher during a patrol mission near Wadi Bei, near the western city of Misrata, on Sunday.
Francisco Leong AFP/Getty Images

Libyan rebels are massed Sunday outside two cities that remain in the hands of forces loyal to ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi.

Rebels tried to advance Saturday on the town of Bani Waleed, about 90 miles southeast of Tripoli, but the advance was aborted, apparently to clear the way for NATO airstrikes on loyalist positions.

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The Two-Way
9:42 am
Sun September 11, 2011

At Ground Zero, Families Are Exploring The New Quiet Space

Family members of the victims entered the 9/11 Memorial Plaza for the first time today.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Brendan Banaszak tells us that at Ground Zero, families of those killed there are already turning the new memorial into a quiet place of remembrance.)

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The Two-Way
9:05 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Musical Moment: Paul Simon Sings 'The Sound Of Silence'

At the World Trade Center earlier today.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's another musical moment from the ceremony in New York.

Singer/songwriter Paul Simon performed his class The Sound of Silence.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Sun September 11, 2011

In New Jersey: A Sunrise Ceremony To Remember Sept. 11 Victims

From New Jersey early today, the view across the Hudson River to the World Trade Center.
Joel Rose NPR

(As we continue covering the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, NPR's Joel Rose tells us of an early morning service in New Jersey.)

Across the Hudson River from the World Trade Center, hundreds of people gathered on the New Jersey waterfront for a ceremony to honor the residents of Jersey City who died 10 years ago today.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Sun September 11, 2011

A Musical Moment Of Reflection: Cellist Yo-Yo Ma At Ground Zero

President Obama looked out at the North Pool of the 9/11 Memorial in New York earlier this morning.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

As we continue to follow the ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, here's something quiet.

A short time ago at the memorial service in New York, cellist Yo-Yo Ma performed Sarabande from Bach's First Suite for Cello Solo.

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Looking Back 10 Years: President Bush's Address To The Nation

At 8:30 p.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush addressed the nation about that day's tragic events. Here's what he said:

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The Two-Way
4:30 am
Sun September 11, 2011

10 Years Later, The Nation Remembers The Sept. 11 Attacks

The "Tribute in Light" illuminates the sky in New York on the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:26 am

Today was a day of mourning for the country. The 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 was marked by prayers, solemn ceremonies, vows to remember the victims and pledges to never let terrorists fundamentally change the American way of life.

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The Two-Way
4:25 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Nearly 80 Americans Wounded, Two Afghans Killed In Attack On Base

A truck bombing at an American base in eastern Afghanistan late Saturday killed two Afghan civilians — one of them a 3-year-old girl — and wounded nearly 80 U.S. military personnel, The Associated Press reports.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility.

According to the AP:

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:14 am
Sun September 11, 2011

San Diego Muslims Open Doors Amid Scrutiny

Parents bring their children to school near a mosque at the Islamic Center of San Diego, Sept. 19, 2001. The current head of the center says before Sept. 11 the Muslim community was insular. He now hosts interfaith meetings and participates in community groups.
David McNew Getty Images

Although thousands of miles from ground zero, the Muslim community in San Diego, Calif., drew attention after Sept. 11, 2001. Two of the hijackers lived there. They also prayed at a local mosque, where noted radical Imam Anwar al-Awlaki preached. Recently, several men from the Somali Muslim community were arrested. They've been charged with aiding a Somali terrorist group.

A local imam has been working to open dialogue between Muslims and the larger community in San Diego in part to combat the suspicion that arose after the local ties came to light.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:01 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Homeland Security Remains An Agency In Progress

The Department of Homeland Security and state governments spend billions of dollars every year on domestic security, helping cities and counties buy up-to-date equipment and strategies for defeating terrorists.

Established in November 2002, the new department absorbed 22 different federal agencies, with the idea of unifying homeland security efforts. But after all this time, have those efforts made us safer?

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Afghanistan
3:44 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Bomb Wounds Dozens Of U.S. Soldiers In Afghanistan

At least 77 American soldiers are wounded after a truck bomb targeted a base west of Kabul. Two separate roadside bombs have killed 10 Afghan civilians.

At an American military base in Wardak Province, a truck full of firewood rammed into the main gate before exploding in flames and shrapnel. Military officials said a blast wall absorbed most of the impact, but nearly 100 Afghan and American personnel suffered injuries. Wardak borders the Afghan capital, Kabul, but the province is considered to be partially under Taliban control.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
2:12 am
Sun September 11, 2011

After Burn Injuries, Sept. 11 Survivor Shows 'Strength'

Lauren and Greg Manning stand with their sons Jagger and Tyler (right) at the Central Park Zoo in 2010. Manning became a symbol of survival after the Sept. 11 attacks, where she suffered burns on more than 80 percent of her body.
Courtesy Lauren Manning

No company suffered on Sept. 11 as much as the bond broker Cantor Fitzgerald, which lost 658 people. One of the few employees to survive that day was Lauren Manning, who was in the lobby of the World Trade Center's North Tower when the first plane hit.

Manning had been rushing to an elevator and was instantly engulfed in flames that came into the lobby, leaving her with burns on more than 80 percent of her body.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:23 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

After Sept. 11, A 'Missed Opportunity' For America

A man standing in rubble shouts to see if anyone needs help after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower in New York on Sept. 11, 2001.
Doug Kanter AFP/Getty Images

The terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, have been pegged as the moment that changed everything for Americans. Nothing was supposed to be the same after the attacks, and it was expected to usher in a new era for America.

Writer George Packer remembers having a moment of optimism.

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U.S.
1:00 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Memorial To Flight 93 Dedicated In Pa.

Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton join current Vice President Joe Biden at a ceremony in Shanksville, Pa., where United Flight 93 crashed 10 years ago tomorrow.

Economy
12:33 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Corporate Taxes: How Low Can You Go?

Google's Netherlands Office has an indoor bike lane.
Google Press

The idea that America's 35 percent corporate tax rate is stifling U.S. economic growth is almost an article of faith among some politicians.

The sound bites from Republican presidential debates to campaign stops are basically interchangeable: "We need to bring that corporate tax rate down."

But in fact, very few corporations pay taxes on 35 percent of their profits. With the help of complex international tax loopholes, some companies manage to pay almost no corporate tax at all.

'Double Irish, Dutch Sandwich'

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
12:32 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Bush Aide Feith: 2 Of 3 Anti-Terror Goals Were Met

Doug Feith served four years in the George W. Bush administration as Donald Rumsfeld's undersecretary of defense for policy. He is now a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute.
Courtesy of Doug Feith

Originally published on Sat September 10, 2011 4:40 pm

The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, reshaped the U.S. foreign policy agenda, says Doug Feith, who was undersecretary of defense for policy in the Bush administration.

He sees the top two goals of that new agenda as achieved: preventing future attacks and disrupting terror networks. But he says the U.S. failed on the other goal: countering ideological support for terrorism.

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Afghanistan
4:16 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Pakistan Could Be Vital To 'Afghan-Led' Peace Process

Pfc. Natan Martinez fires a machine gun from a position near the Pakistan border in Afghanistan. There is concern in Pakistan about the U.S. preserving a security presence in Afghanistan beyond 2014, the deadline to pull out most if not all U.S. combat troops.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 11:05 am

An end to the war in Afghanistan is slowly beginning to come into view, 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks. Few countries have been as deeply affected by the decade of fighting as Pakistan.

Since 2001, Islamist extremism fueled by the Afghan conflict has claimed the lives of 35,000 Pakistanis — 30,000 of them civilians.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:06 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Tennessee Town Grapples With Sept. 11 Legacy

Hundreds of men pray at the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tenn. The congregation wants to build a new, bigger place to worship, but has faced stiff opposition from citizens who fear the local Muslims have a political agenda. Imam Ossama Bahloul says it's nonsense to think the congregation is a threat.
Debbie Elliott

In Murfreesboro, Tenn., more than 5,000 people are expected Sunday for the annual Sept. 11 memorial. What started as a small flag ceremony at the Rutherford County's Sheriff's Department 10 years ago is now a major community event. Murfreesboro has been dealing with another legacy of the attacks, which is playing out in a controversy over a mosque.

A Local Response To The Trauma

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:03 am
Sat September 10, 2011

With TSA, Are We Safer Or Sorry?

At the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, a small temporary exhibit marks Sept. 11, 2001. Along with artifacts found in the wreckage of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon — like a smashed firetruck door and twisted bits of fuselage — is a bin filled with every imaginable object people have tried to carry on airplanes.

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Science
3:34 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Thirsty Birds 'Burn the Engine' In Flight

A Swainson's thrush flies a mock-migration in the wind tunnel at the University of Western Ontario.
Science AAAS

Migratory songbirds like Swainson's thrushes spend their winters in South and Central America. But as spring approaches, they fly thousands of miles north to Canada.

Along the way, these little birds show endurance that would shame even the toughest athletes. They can fly for up to eight hours straight without stopping for food or water.

Scientists know how birds cope without food during the flights: They burn fat. But until now, they haven't figured out the water question. How do migrating birds avoid dehydration after all that flying?

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Politics
3:20 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Obama Launches Aggressive Push For Jobs Plan

President Obama speaks about his new jobs proposal at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Va., on Friday.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

President Obama is selling his jobs plan as a much-needed shot in the arm for a still struggling economy. It includes new public works projects, help for local school districts, training opportunities for those who have been out of work a long time, and more than $200 billion in tax cuts for workers and the companies that hire them.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
4:18 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

New York City Beefs Up Security Ahead Of Sept. 11

Police officers watch travelers at the entrance of the Grand Central subway terminal in New York on Thursday. Security measures around the city were increased two days before the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

New York City was on high alert this week, even before Thursday night's announcement that there was a "credible but unconfirmed" terrorist threat to New York and Washington, D.C. Newspaper headlines screamed about a city on lockdown.

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The Two-Way
3:43 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Report: 160,000 Deported Without Facing Judge

Over the course of seven years, 160,000 immigrants have been deported without ever facing a judge, a new report reveals. Issued by the National Immigration Law Center, the report charges that the U.S. has used something called "stipulated removal" to strong arm immigrants into signing away their due process.

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Business
3:39 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Earlier Stimulus Offers Lessons For A Second Round

President Obama called on legislators on Thursday to pass his American Jobs Act, which proposes billions of dollars in new spending on infrastructure.

"Building a world-class transportation system is part of what made us an economic superpower," Obama told a joint session of Congress.

It's difficult to say exactly how much additional infrastructure spending would take place if the president's plan is approved by Congress. But experts say examining how — and if — previous stimulus projects created jobs can help maximize results for this round.

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The Picture Show
3:31 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

For Veterans, The Tough Climb Back To Civilian Life

Iraq War veteran Tyler Daly goes rock climbing in Colorado.
David Gilkey NPR

The lasting legacies of Sept. 11 are numerous — sometimes elusive. There's the altered New York City skyline and the ongoing war. There also are wounded soldiers coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan each year to face a new battle: Fitting back into civilian life.

Rehabilitation programs exist for those returning with physical wound, but little support exists for those with invisible wounds such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:53 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Babesia In The Blood? There Should Be A Test For That

Deer ticks like this one can spread a parasite that causes babesiosis. And infected people can spread it through blood donations.
Jim Gathany CDC

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 12:37 pm

Nobody likes ticks. Well, maybe some scientists who study them do. But civilians and people concerned with public health really are not fans.

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