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12:43 pm
Fri August 26, 2011

A Dictator's Choice: Cushy Exile Or Go Underground

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi is the latest in a line of dictators who — facing the end of their days in power — must choose an exit strategy.
Pier Paolo Cito AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:30 am

Why didn't Moammar Gadhafi choose a comfortable retirement in exile when he had the chance?

It's an age-old question for faltering dictators. When some are losing their grip on power, they are pragmatic and look for a cushy home abroad rather than face the wrath of their angry compatriots.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:40 pm
Fri August 26, 2011

Jogging Fights Beer Belly Fat Better Than Weights

If you're overweight, the best way to spend your limited time exercising is aerobic activity, a researcher says.
Rhodes ludovic iStockphoto.com

Weight training is touted as the cure for many ills. But if the goal is to lose belly fat, aerobic exercise is the only way to go, exercise scientists say.

We're not talking about muffin tops, the annoying bit of pudge that rolls over a woman's waistline and is featured in those strange Internet ads. Rather, this is gut fat lodged around internal organs, which could look like a beer belly from the outisde. It's considered a risk factor for diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Fri August 26, 2011

Navy SEAL's Loyal Dog Now With Master's Friend

Hawkeye, by his master one last time.
Lisa Pembleton Home Post

Few stories in the past week or so have touched more hearts that that of Hawkeye, the loyal Labrador retriever who lay down next to the flag-draped casket of his master, U.S. Navy SEAL Jon Tumilson.

One of the 30 U.S. military personnel killed in Afghanistan when their helicopter was hit by enemy fire on Aug. 6, Tumilson was remembered at a funeral service in Rockford, Iowa, on Aug. 19.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Fri August 26, 2011

New York City Orders Evacuations In Low-Lying Areas

All residents of New York City who live in low-lying areas must evacuate their neighborhoods by 5 p.m. ET Saturday because Hurricane Irene is headed their way, Mayor Michael Bloomberg just announced.

Reuters says an estimated 250,000 people are affected. The city is opening shelters. Bloomberg said this has never been done before.

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The Two-Way
10:42 am
Fri August 26, 2011

In Chile Protests, A Teenager Is Dead, 1,400 Arrested

A two-day strike culminated in a massive march that left a 16-year-old dead and close to 1,400 arrested in Chile, yesterday. The AP reports:

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Politics
10:00 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Libyan Rebels Gain Ground, Perry Leads U.S. Polls

Originally published on Fri August 26, 2011 11:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, Host:

I'm Michel Martin and you're listening to TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, as the Eastern United States confronts a severe tropical storm, possibly hurricane, East Africa is still facing drought and famine. We'll get an update on the crisis that has already caused hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes in the Horn of Africa. NPR's West Africa correspondent is on the scene and she'll tell us more but first it's time for our political chat.

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The Two-Way
9:55 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Obama: 'Don't Wait, Don't Delay' If You're In Irene's Path

"If you are in the projected path of this hurricane, you have to take precautions now," President Obama just told Americans along the East Coast, which is bracing for the arrival of Hurricane Irene this weekend.

"Don't wait, don't delay. We all hope for the best, but we have to be prepared for the worst. All of us have to take this storm seriously," Obama said from Martha's Vineyard, Mass., where he and his family are vactioning.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:20 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Vitamin A Supplements Save Kids' Lives, Researchers Say

A child receives a dose of vitamin A in Guatemala City.
YURI CORTEZ AFP/Getty Images

It's not often that health experts say the evidence on something is so good that it would be wrong to keep studying it. But that's exactly what a group of researchers who've reviewed 43 trials on vitamin A supplementation for young children in developing countries contend.

Their review showed that vitamin A supplements reduced child mortality by 24 percent in low and middle income countries by preventing measles, diarrhea, and vision problems in children.

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The Two-Way
8:55 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Rhino Horn Crisis Reaches Into Europe's Museums

In late July, the Brussels Royal Institute for Natural Sciences Museum was among those targeted by horn robbers.
Georges Gobet AFP/Getty Images

The devastating toll that poachers have been taking on Africa's rhinos now has a parallel story in Europe.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Fri August 26, 2011

52 Dead After Gunmen In Northern Mexico Ignite Fire At Casino

Smoke billows from the Casino Royale in Monterrey, Mexico on Thursday.
AP

Originally published on Fri August 26, 2011 5:40 pm

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The Two-Way
8:17 am
Fri August 26, 2011

No Signs Of New Steps In Fed Chief Bernanke's Address

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's much-anticipated speech this morning on the current state of the economy and Fed policy has just been put online by the Fed.

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Economy
8:11 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Bernanke Offers No New Measures To Boost Economy

Chairman Ben Bernanke is proposing no new steps by the Federal Reserve to boost the U.S. economy while hinting that Congress may need to act to stimulate hiring and growth.

Bernanke said Friday that while record-low interest rates will promote growth over time, the weak economy requires further help in the short run. He is speaking at an annual economic conference in Jackson Hole, Wyo.

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The Two-Way
7:04 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Damn Yankees! Bronx Bombers Smash Record Three Grand Slams

Cano, Granderson and Martin aren't a "murderers' row" just yet,

But they did something last night that hadn't been done before, not even by the 1927 Yankees and that team's famed murderers' row of Ruth, Gehrig, Lazzeri and others.

In a 22-9 shellacking of the Oakland A's, the Yankees' Robinson Cano, Curtis Granderson and Russell Martin each hit grand slam home runs. It's the first time any Major League team hit more than two in one game.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Economy Grew At 1 Percent Rate In Second Quarter

The U.S. economy grew at an even slightly slower pace than we thought in the second quarter, the Bureau of Economic Analysis just reported.

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The Two-Way
6:25 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Top Stories: Irene, Libya, Bernanke, Attacks In Nigeria And Mexico

Good morning. There's a lot going on today, so we'll be quick with the top headlines, including some of the news we've already posted about:

-- "Irene On Track To Soak N.C., Barrel North Toward New York."

-- "Explosion At U.N. Building In Nigeria; Bomb Suspected."

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Bernanke To Speak: Interest Is High, But No Surprises Are Expected

Originally published on Fri August 26, 2011 6:19 am

Though "nervous investors" are waiting anxiously to hear what Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke has to say later this morning when he speaks at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City's annual economic policy conference in Jackson Hole, Wyo., in reality he "isn't likely to break much new monetary-policy ground," The Wall Street Journal's

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Libya: Opposition Pushes On; Gadhafi Still On The Run

In Tripoli on Thursday (Aug. 25, 2011), this anti-Gadhafi fighter celebrated.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

As Libya's Transitional National Council prepares to move its leadership from the eastern city of Behghazi to Tripoli, Moammar Gadhafi remains "on the run with his regime in tatters," NPR.org writes this morning.

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The Two-Way
5:20 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Developing: Explosion At U.N. Building In Nigeria; Bomb Suspected

Breaking news from The Associated Press:

"A large explosion struck the United Nations' main office in Nigeria's capital Friday, flattening one wing of the building in Abuja. A U.N. official in Geneva called it a bomb attack.

" 'I saw scattered bodies,' said Michael Ofilaje, a UNICEF worker at the building. 'Many people are dead.' He said it felt like 'the blast came from the basement and shook the building.' "

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The Two-Way
5:00 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Irene On Track To Soak N.C., Barrel North Toward New York

Head inland: Nags Head, N.C., is among the many communities along the East Coast that are, or have been, evacuated as Irene draws near.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Though Hurricane Irene has weakened slightly and its projected track has been nudged east just a bit, it's still headed for what could be a devastating collision with the East Coast of the U.S. that will affect tens of millions of people from North Carolina to New England over the weekend.

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Asia
4:17 am
Fri August 26, 2011

After 15 Months In Office Japan's Leader Steps Down

Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan announced his resignation on Friday. He held the top leadership position for 15 months. His popularity dropped after the government was criticized for its handling of the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. Kenneth Cukier, the Tokyo correspondent for The Economist, about the political situation in Japan.

Around the Nation
3:10 am
Fri August 26, 2011

Texas Drought Takes Its Toll On Wildlife

It's not only people suffering from the drought in Texas. Susan Edwards, manager of Wildlife Rescue, holds a juvenile raccoon. The raccoon should at least be double in size, but its mother's milk was lacking needed nutrients.
John Burnett NPR

The unfolding calamity that is the Texas drought has thrown nature out of balance. Many of the wild things that live in this state are suffering.

Sections of major rivers — like the Brazos, the Guadalupe, the Blanco, Llano and Pedernales — have dried up. In many places, there aren't even mud holes anymore.

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Technology
10:01 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Patent Wars Could Dull Tech's Cutting Edge

Some call it an international patent arms race: Tech companies like Apple, Samsung, Nokia and Google are launching lawsuits over competing patent claims related to smartphones and tablets.

As NPR's Laura Sydell tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne, companies are mounting takeovers aimed at gaining control of thousands of patents.

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Science
10:01 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Big-Box Stores' Hurricane Prep Starts Early

A convoy of Walmart trucks waited to enter New Orleans on Sept. 1, 2005, after the city was battered by Hurricane Katrina. Government agencies said the massive storm taught them that big-box retailers need to be an integral part of hurricane preparation and relief efforts.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Forecasters don't expect Hurricane Irene to make landfall until Saturday. But for nearly a week now, big-box retailers like Walmart and Home Depot have been getting ready.

They've deployed hundreds of trucks carrying everything from plywood to Pop-Tarts to stores in the storm's path. It's all possible because these retailers have turned hurricane preparation into a science — one that government emergency agencies have begun to embrace.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Drought Puts Texas Ranchers, And Cattle, At Risk

A severe drought has caused shortages of grass, hay and water in most of Texas, forcing ranchers to thin their herds or risk losing their cattle to the drought. Cattle use a tree for shade in late July, as temperatures rose above 100 degrees near Canadian, Texas.
Scott Olson Getty Images

In the cattle town of Emory in East Texas, the worst drought in state history is threatening a way of life. Scorching temperatures and no rain have forced many ranchers to sell off their stock.

Normally before being brought to market, cattle are penned in a rancher's best pasture to be fattened. The heavier the cow, the more the buyer pays.

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Middle East
10:01 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Western Sanctions May Put Slow Squeeze On Syria

Syrian street vendors display their goods in downtown Damascus on Tuesday, Aug. 23. Syria's economy was hit hard initially by the anti-government uprising. It has bounced back, but now the U.S. is urging the E.U. to join in banning import of crude oil from Syria.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

The Syrian economy has so far weathered the mass protests and widespread violence that have rocked most every major city. But in a move that could increase the pressure, the European Union is considering a ban on imported Syrian oil, similar to sanctions the U.S. imposed earlier this month.

Western governments say the Syrian regime's harsh response to an anti-government uprising has demonstrated that it is not fit to lead.

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Sports
10:01 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Woman Reaches K2's Summit, And A Place In History

Climber Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner sits with her husband, Ralf Dujmovits, in this file photo from 2009. This week, Kaltenbrunner became the first woman to climb all the world's 14 tallest peaks without using supplementary oxygen.
Ralf Dujmovits dapd

At more than 28,000 feet, K2 is the second-highest mountain in the world. And when Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner reached its summit this week, she became the first woman to climb all 14 of the world's tallest peaks without using any supplementary oxygen.

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Sports
10:01 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Female Golfing Phenom Seeks Titles, Recognition

The world's top women golfers are battling it out in Mirabel, Quebec, this week at the Canadian Women's Open. In the field is a powerful, yet little-known player: world No. 1 Yani Tseng of Taiwan.

Tseng has been powering and smiling her way around golf courses — and making history. At the relatively tender age of 22, she's already done something that no one who's swung a golf club has done before: Tseng has won five major championships.

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Economy
10:01 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

As Economy Teeters, All Eyes On Bernanke

Investors are closely watching Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's speech Friday in Jackson Hole, Wyo.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 26, 2011 9:41 am

Nervous investors will be listening Friday to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's remarks in Jackson Hole, Wyo., for clues to additional steps the Fed might take to shore up the sagging economy.

For the past three decades, central bankers, and the people who watch them, have been gathering each summer in the Rocky Mountain resort to do some deep thinking about the economy. Fiscal watchdog Maya MacGuineas, who has attended several of these meetings, says it's not just the view of the Grand Tetons that makes them special.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Arizona Sues Federal Government Over Voting Rights Act

Arizona is once again challenging the authority of the federal government. This time the state's attorney general is suing the feds to get out from under the Voting Rights Act, which requires Arizona to get prior approval before changing election rules and maps.

NPR's Carrie Johnson filed this report:

Tom Horne, the top elected lawyer in Arizona, says the landmark 1965 voting rights law is out of date and forces the state to bend to the whim of the federal Justice Department.

Arizona says the law is unconstitutional.

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The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Hurricane Irene: Why One Couple Isn't Heeding Evacuation Orders

Cars pass a mandatory evacuation sign on Hatteras Island in the North Carolina.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Hurricane Irene is forecast to hit North Carolina hard. The National Hurricane Center says it will be a major Category 3 hurricane as it makes landfall, so state officials have ordered evacuations of the Outer Banks, the barrier islands exposed off the Carolina's Atlantic coast.

As always, there are those who stay put. All Things Considered host Melissa Block spoke to a husband and wife who live in Ocracoke, N.C. and they're planning on weathering the storm at home.

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