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6:50 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Cameron Promises Order As British Rioting Continues

Police collect evidence at the scene where three people were killed after being struck by a vehicle in the Winson Green area on Aug. 10 in Birmingham, England. The three men were allegedly trying to protect local stores from looters.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:34 am

British Prime Minister David Cameron vowed Wednesday to do "whatever is necessary" to halt massive riots that have swept London and other major cities in recent days — the worst such violence to hit the country in decades.

A wave of arson and looting that started in parts of London on Saturday has spread to other cities, including Manchester and Birmingham.

Cameron, who has recalled Parliament from its summer recess for an emergency debate on the riots, said police have drawn up contingency plans to "do whatever is necessary to restore law and order onto our streets.

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Opinion
6:48 am
Wed August 10, 2011

New Republic: Risky Approach On Education Reform

President Barack Obama walks with Education Secretary Arne Duncan at the White House in Washington in May. Duncan wants school to meet a set of condition in order to take advantage of the president's education waivers.
Charles Dharapak AP

Simon van Zuylen-Wood is a reporter-researcher at The New Republic.

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Opinion
6:48 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Weekly Standard: President Cheats On School Reform

The legality of President Obama's education waivers has come under question.
iStockphoto.com

Joy Pullmann is managing editor of School Reform News and an education research fellow at The Heartland Institute.

The president has decided to take a tack on the largest federal education law he certainly wishes were available in budget battles: bypassing Congress and legislating through administrative agencies by offering states waivers in exchange for education policies he favors.

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Opinion
6:48 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Foreign Policy: Downgrade Good As Gold, Literally

Since 1937, Colombia has been the largest producer of gold for the United States. Investors are turning to gold as the the economy struggles.
iStockphoto.com

Elizabeth Dickinson is a freelance journalist and former assistant managing editor at Foreign Policy.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Whole Foods: Ramadan Promotion Has Not Been Canceled

A Whole Foods store in San Rafael, Calif. (Feb. 17, 2010, file photo.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Looking to set the record straight, the Whole Foods grocery chain says it is "still carrying and promoting halal products for those that are celebrating Ramadan this month."

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The Two-Way
5:25 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Markets On Rise; London Calmer, But Rioting Elsewhere In U.K.

A woman walks past a broken cafe window in London earlier today (Aug. 10, 2011).
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Good morning.

Financial markets in Asia and Europe have rallied today, extending the rebound that began on Wall Street Tuesday afternoon after the Federal Reserve said it plans to keep interest rates at rock-bottom levels for the next two years in a bid to help keep ailing economies from weakening further.

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Politics
10:01 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Debt Downgrade: A Spark For Political Compromise?

In the wake of the U.S. debt downgrade, the markets have been volatile, but the political fallout has been less clear so far. With Congress on its August recess, party leaders are lying low while they gather their rank-and-file and make plans for what's next.

When Standard & Poor's downgraded the country's credit rating, it was clear about why: Its statement said it "reflects our view that the effectiveness, stability, and predictability of American policymaking and political institutions have weakened at a time of ongoing fiscal and economic challenges."

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Economy
10:01 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Oil Prices Plummet In Uncertain Market

Originally published on Wed August 10, 2011 6:04 am

Oil prices are falling, as traders dial back their expectation for the global demand for oil. But drivers are still waiting for the price of gasoline to drop as well.

The price of oil closed on Tuesday at about $79 a barrel — the lowest since last September.

Crude oil prices were on the rise in the beginning of the year. Unrest in the Middle East put pressure on supplies, and traders had a more optimistic outlook about the demand for oil, explains Richard Soultanian, an oil industry analyst with NUS Consulting Group.

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Science
10:01 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Polar Bear Scientist Faces New Questions

A Polar Bear walks on the frozen tundra on the edge of Hudson Bay waiting for the Hudson Bay to freeze-over 14 November 2007 outside Churchill, Mantioba, Canada. Polar Bears return every year to Churchill, the Polar Bear capital of the world, where they remain hunting for seals on the icepack until the Spring thaw.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

A wildlife biologist is continuing to face questions about an influential paper he wrote on apparently drowned polar bears, with government investigators reportedly asking whether he improperly steered a research contract to another scientist as a reward for reviewing that paper.

"They seem to be suggesting that there is some sort of conspiracy that involves global warming and back scratching that appears to be frankly just nuts," says Jeff Ruch, a lawyer with Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Assateague's Wild Horses Get Too Close To Company

The first thing visitors notice about Assateague Island National Seashore is this: The 114 wild horses that inhabit the beachfront park along the Atlantic Ocean have full run of the place.

Summer is peak season for some 2 million tourists who visit Maryland's Assateague Island, famed for those wild horses. But increased interaction between man and beast is causing problems with the horses' diets and behaviors.

A Taste For Junk Food

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Business
10:01 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Economic Turmoil Rattles Unsettled Housing Market

For most people, their biggest investment is their home. Following Standard and Poor's downgrade of U.S. credit, as well as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, there may be even more uncertainty about buying or selling a home right now.

Russell Zanca, 47, has a three bedroom, one and a half bath vintage brick Georgian house on the market. The anthropology professor's home is on a quiet tree-lined street on Chicago's North Side.

"It's just a nice solid house," Zanca says.

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Sweetness And Light
8:00 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Thinking Back On Bubba Smith

Bubba Smith, who died last week, was a teammate of mine. I can see him giving me a stern, put-on sneer in response to that claim, and in truth, no, Bubba and I were not football teammates. Rather, we acted in an ensemble as Lite Beer All-Stars back when Miller used a lot of washed-up old athletes — and one overwhelmed sportswriter — to hustle what was then a popular new product: a low-calorie beer.

Remember? "Tastes great!" "Less filling!"

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

U.K. Riots Continue Outside London; Bookstores Soldier On

Fire rips through a retail store in Manchester, in northwest England, Tuesday, marking a fourth night of violence in Britain. Looters have targeted electronics and clothing stores.
Andrew Yates AFP/Getty Images

With 16,000 police officers out in full force in London's streets in an effort to put a stop to violent riots that have ravaged the city for three days, the British capital was "relatively calm" Tuesday, says the BBC.

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Europe
4:03 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

In Turkey, Proposed Internet Filters Stir Protests

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton answers on CNN-Turk, July 16, 2011. Clinton said that the United States was "concerned" about media freedom and free speech in Turkey amid the arrest of dozens of journalists and restrictions on the Internet.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Faced with criticism at home and abroad, Turkey has decided to delay new Internet restrictions that were due to take effect this month. The government also has reduced the number of filters, which it says will target adult content.

Critics call the filters another blow to freedom of expression. Scores of Turkish journalists are already in jail, and thousands more are under investigation. The issue is clouding Turkey's reputation as a model for the region.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

In U.S. Stock Market Rally, Apple Briefly Supplanted Exxon Mobil

A trader at the New York Stock Exchange watches a monitor moments before the Federal Reserve announced it would keep interest rates low through at least 2013. The news reassured investors and helped sustain a rally.
Mario Tama Getty Images

For evidence of the volatile swings of Tuesday's stock market, consider that for a bit, Apple became the most valuable American company, surpassing Exxon Mobil. The day's trading spanned 600 points, as investors rallied from two days of steep declines and digested new guidance from the Federal Reserve.

The S&P 500 index of large-cap U.S. companies saw its largest gain in two years, rising by nearly 5 percent. Just the day before, it had fallen by 6.7 percent.

For Newscast, Yuki Noguchi filed this report:

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Europe
3:29 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Britain Braces For More Violence As Unrest Spreads

Firemen hosed down an area of Clapham, South London, on Tuesday after another night of violence left trails of looted stores, wrecked cars and burned buildings across London and several other cities.
Elizabeth Dalziel AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:34 am

Thousands more police officers flooded London streets Tuesday in a bid to end Britain's worst rioting in a generation as nervous shopkeepers closed early and some residents stood guard to protect their neighborhoods. An eerie calm prevailed in the city, but unrest spread across central and northern England on a fourth night of violence driven by poor, diverse and brazen crowds of young people.

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Europe
3:20 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Italians Bristle At The Price Of Financial Help

Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi, right, and Finance minister Giulio Tremonti at a new conference in Rome on Aug. 5. The European Central Bank has agreed to help Italy with its debt crisis, but is demanding tough austerity measures.
Andrew Medichini AP

This week, Italy became the front-line in the battle to save the euro.

But it isn't the Italians taking the lead. With indecision in Rome, the European Central Bank took the unprecedented move of dictating budget-cutting policies to the third largest economy in the euro-zone.

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi will now have to accelerate tough austerity measures in exchange for help to solve the country's debt crisis.

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The Two-Way
3:06 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

U.S. Official Is First To Attend Nagasaki Ceremony Marking Nuclear Strike

James Zumwalt, deputy chief of the U.S. embassy in Tokyo, offers a wreath of flowers at a ceremony marking the 66th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki.
AFP/Getty Images

A ceremonial bell tolled in Nagasaki, Japan, Tuesday morning, marking the beginning of a moment of silence to remember tens of thousands of people killed by an atomic bomb that fell from a U.S. plane 66 years ago. And for the first time, the ceremony was attended by a U.S. government official.

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Europe
2:49 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Why London Exploded Last Night

A British riot policeman stands guard in front of a burning building and burnt out car in Croydon, South London on August 8, 2011.
CARL DE SOUZA AFP/Getty Images

I knew we were in for a rough night here in Stoke Newington in the London Borough of Hackney when my wife called me at 5 p.m. from Sainsbury's, our local supermarket, to say she was in a lock down. They were shuttering the place and the police were telling her trouble had already started outside the Hackney Town Hall. The cops told her to go home and stay off the streets.

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Economy
2:34 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

High Teen Unemployment Molding 'Lost Generation'

Teens perform in a summer theater program in Washington, D.C., where the teen unemployment rate is currently the nation's highest, at nearly 50 percent.
Amanda Steen NPR

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 3:22 pm

The Labor Department's latest unemployment report offered a small sign of hope, with the nation's jobless rate dipping to 9.1 percent in July. But the new numbers also showed that teen unemployment is still on the rise, now at 25 percent.

Across the country, 16- to 19-year-olds are facing the end of the third summer in a row of unemployment rates above 20 percent. Economists warn that if the trend continues, a generation of young people could face a bleak future in the workforce.

Not Making The Cut

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The Two-Way
2:06 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Mysterious Orange Goo ID'ed As Eggs; Alaskan Village Still Worries

Scientists say the microscopic eggs, seen here under magnification, derive their orange color from a droplet of fat.
NOAA

A mysterious orange goo that appeared on the shore of a small village in Alaska has been identified as "millions of microscopic eggs filled with fatty droplets," the AP reports. But researchers say they still don't know what the eggs might hatch, or if they are toxic.

The mass of eggs began appearing last week, surprising even longtime residents of the village of Kivalina. Discovery News, which spoke with a town official, describes the goo:

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Business
1:55 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Truck Industry Welcomes New Fuel Regulations

The Obama administration announced Tuesday the first ever fuel efficiency standards for larger trucks and buses. New vehicles sold in 2018 will go up to 20 percent farther on a gallon of fuel. So far, the truck manufacturing industry is welcoming the rules.

Outside the White House today, the heavyweights of the truck manufacturing industry took the microphone one after another.

"We're happy to be part of this. We really appreciate the process," says Denny Slagle, CEO of Mack Trucks.

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Former Treasury Secretary Says Market Ails Are Europe's Fault

As the closing bell approaches, after another dramatic day on Wall Street, Henry M. Paulson, the Treasury secretary under President George W. Bush told The New York Times that what's happening now in the markets is reminiscent of 2008. That's when the market tanked as Lehman Brothers was allowed to go bankrupt.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:52 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Test a Mother's Blood To Learn Her Baby's Sex Early On

A new fetal DNA test to determine a baby's gender could be more accurate and faster than an ultrasound, researchers say.
André Panneton iStockphoto.com

Boy or girl? Expectant parents are often dying to know. Some mothers are even trying to influence it with their diet. But the tests used to determine a baby's sex before birth leave a lot to be desired.

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Economy
1:04 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Foreigners Still Consider The U.S. A Good Buy

Despite the debt downgrade and recent upheavals in the stock market, foreign investors still consider the United States a good place to put their money for the long haul.

Forget China, India and Brazil. The U.S. still attracts easily the most foreign direct investment – purchases of companies and property, as opposed to stock holdings or government bonds – of any nation in the world.

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U.S.
1:00 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Fallen Troops Arrive In Dover, Attended By Obama

President Obama added a trip to Dover Air Force Base to his schedule Tuesday. He was on hand — with top military leaders — for the return of the remains of U.S. military personnel killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.

Economy
1:00 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Markets Volatile As Fed Makes Announcement

Domestic and foreign markets are still reacting to Standard & Poor's downgrade of the U.S. debt. And now states and cities are seeing their risk assessments lowered.

Economy
1:00 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Fed Sticks With Record Low Interest Rates

The Federal Reserve Board of Governors met Tuesday and announced that interest rates will likely remain at record lows for two more years. The action by the Fed was aimed at calming nervous investors.

Europe
1:00 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Londoners Press Leaders For Action Amid Violence

London's mayor, Boris Johnson, faced hostile questioning from local residents when he visited a riot-hit area of the city Tuesday. They wanted to know why the police had been unable to prevent gangs of youths burning and looting the area on Monday night. Meanwhile, Londoners armed with brooms and shovels started to clean up their city.

The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Aid Boosted To Somalia; U.S. Mogadishu Vet Says He Would Return

Some 800 metric tons of food are on the way to East Africa, where more than 12 million people are suffering from a severe drought. The U.N. World Food Program is using nine airlifts to send high-energy biscuits to Kenya, where it will be distributed to famine victims.

The shipment is expected to be enough to feed 1.6 million people for one day. The United Nations says that 640,000 children in the Horn of Africa region are at risk of acute malnutrition.

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