NPR News

Pages

Monkey See
8:53 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Steve Jobs And The Cultural Apple

Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivers the keynote address at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in June 2011. Jobs announced on August 24 that he would step down immediately as CEO of Apple.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

When Steve Jobs stepped down from his position as CEO of Apple yesterday, he handed the reins immediately to chief operating officer Tim Cook, who has had such a significant hand in day-to-day operations that many expect that Apple won't immediately suffer much in the way of effects on either its ability to turn out beloved products or its business position.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:00 am
Thu August 25, 2011

In Gadhafi's Compound: A Condoleezza Rice Photo Album

Guns. Cars. Artwork. Statues.

And an album full of photos of former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

Odd as that may sound, what appears to be something of a keepsake about Rice — who Moammar Gadhafi once referred to as "my darling black African woman" and of whom he said, "I love her very much" — was found by opposition fighters as they searched and ransacked the Libyan leader's compound in Tripoli.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:40 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Warren Buffett Invests $5 Billion In Bank Of America; Stock Soars

Shares in Bank of America jumped nearly 25 percent in"premarket trading" this morning after it was reported that billionaire investment guru Warren Buffett is buying a $5 billion stake in the company, The Wall Street Journal's MarketBeat blog writes.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:00 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Cheney: I Urged Bush To Bomb Syria

Former Vice President Dick Cheney. (Feb. 10, 2011, file photo.)
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu August 25, 2011 7:52 am

"Former Vice President Dick Cheney says in a new memoir that he urged President George W. Bush to bomb a suspected Syrian nuclear reactor site in June 2007," The New York Times reports this morning.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:38 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week; Verizon Strike A Factor

The number of people filing first-time claims for unemployment benefits rose by 5,000 last week from the week before, to 417,000, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

Though the number of claims remained well above the level normally associated with a healthy economy, one factor was temporary. According to Reuters, "Verizon workers filed 8,500 claims for jobless benefits last week, after submitting 12,500 applications the previous week."

Read more
The Two-Way
6:10 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Markets Rise On More Hopeful Economic Outlook

The Two-Way
5:55 am
Thu August 25, 2011

'International Effort' Underway To Find Gadhafi

Surveillance aircraft provided by the U.S. and, according to British media reports, special forces from the U.K., are helping in the hunt for Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, who is in Tripoli, reported for Morning Edition earlier today.

"It's an all-out effort" as opposition fighters, with help from their international allies, look for Gadhafi, she added.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:30 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Hurricane Watches Up In N.C. As Irene Chugs Toward U.S.

Irene's latest projected path.
National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Irene has "roared across the Bahamas archipelago" and remains on track to hit the coast of North Carolina on Saturday and then soak much of the Eastern seaboard over the weekend and into next week as it chugs north.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:00 am
Thu August 25, 2011

As Apple's Steve Jobs Steps Down, Tim Cook Steps Up

Tim Cook, who is Apple's new CEO. (Oct. 20, 2010, file photo.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The news last night that Apple Inc. co-founder and visionary Steve Jobs is giving up his post at CEO naturally leads to this question:

Just who is Tim Cook, the Apple chief operating officer who has been tapped to take over as CEO?

Read more
Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

New U.S. Deportation Policy Spares Some

Immigrants and their lawyers are beginning to see the effects of the White House policy announced last week that downgrades some deportation cases.

The Department of Homeland Security says it hasn't officially begun to prioritize all 300,000 cases before the nation's immigration courts, but prosecutors are definitely employing newfound discretion.

Read more
Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Grizzlies Test Products To Keep Out The Average Bear

Last summer marked an all-time high for human-bear conflicts in Yellowstone. The number of grizzly bears there has tripled since they were placed on the endangered species list in the mid-1970s.

But in a strange twist, many of the bears that were involved in conflicts with humans are now helping people to not lure bears into temptation.

Hooked On Human Food

Grizzly bears are a way of life in the northwest corner of Wyoming.

Read more
U.S.
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Puerto Rican Governor Faces Opposition To Pipeline

Demonstrators march during a May 1 protest against the proposed construction of a 92-mile gas pipeline in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Fortuno has made the project a central goal of his administration, despite protest from communities affected.
Ricardo Alcaraz AP

If you think your monthly electric bills are high, be thankful you don't live in Puerto Rico. An island where nearly all energy sources must be imported, the U.S. territory has residential power costs that are double those on the mainland.

To help bring down the cost of energy, Puerto Rico's governor is pushing an ambitious plan to build a 92-mile-long natural gas pipeline.

But that plan has run into significant opposition in Puerto Rico and in Congress.

Homes In The Pipeline's Path

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Better A You Than Me: Scientists Sicken Mosquitoes To Stop Dengue

Researchers hope to keep the mosquito that transmits dengue, Aedes aegypti, from infecting humans using the Wolbachia bacterium.
James Gathany CDC Public Health Image Library

Scientists in Australia are using a bacterium to try to stop a deadly virus in its tracks.

Read more
Science
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Mosquito Research Feels Bite Of Budget Cuts

Tara Hannon empties a mosquito trap at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven, Conn. Federal funding helped expand this program, but there have been significant cuts over the past five years.
Craig LeMoult

State laboratories around the country are testing mosquitoes to warn people about the presence of the West Nile virus, but federal and state budget cuts are threatening some of those labs.

Abbott Brush collects mosquitoes for observation at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. One mosquito trap — a bucket of smelly water — is in a wooded area of New Haven near a pond.

"It attracts them because they want to come there and lay the eggs," he says.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:38 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Justice Dept. To Probe If News Corp. Hacked 9/11 Families

Attorney General Eric Holder
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 25, 2011 4:37 am

Attorney General Eric Holder and senior FBI officials on Wednesday told relatives of people who died in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks that they had opened a preliminary criminal investigation into allegations the victims' phones had been hacked by News Corp.

Read more
Technology
4:47 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Apple CEO Steve Jobs To Step Down

Apple said CEO Steve Jobs has resigned. He will be replaced by chief operating officer Tim Cook. Jobs has been elected Apple's chairman.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Steve Jobs, the mind behind the iPhone, iPad and other devices that turned Apple Inc. into one of the world's most powerful companies, resigned as the company's CEO Wednesday, saying he can no longer handle the job.

The move appears to be the result of an unspecified medical condition for which he took an indefinite leave from his post in January. Apple's chief operating officer, Tim Cook, has been named CEO.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Samsung Objects To iPad Patent Saying Stanley Kubrick Came Up With It First

Talking Point Memo's Idea Lab points us to a novel legal argument by Samsung.

The Korean electronics maker is arguing that Apple has no right to its D'889 Patent on its iPad, because Stanley Kubrick showed off the idea in his 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Read more
Conflict In Libya
3:59 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Libyan Rebels Struggle To Impose Order On Tripoli

Libyan rebels remove the green flags from poles at the Abu Salim square in Tripoli on Aug. 26 after the opposition forces announced the transfer of their leadership to the capital.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:30 am

Packed into cars and pickup trucks, Libya's rebels honked their horns and fired into the air as they paraded through Tripoli's central square on Wednesday in a show of force and celebration.

Some fighters deliberately targeted the ancient stone walls of the old city that flank the square — apparently because Moammar Gadhafi used the ramparts as a podium while giving speeches. And everyone is now calling it Martyrs Square, rather than Green Square, which was Gadhafi's term.

Read more
Africa
3:42 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

No Relief In Sight For Somali Refugees In Kenya

Women and children at the Dadaab refugee complex in Kenya line up Aug. 24 to receive ifthar — a meal of rice, meat and vegetables to break the Ramadan fast. Somalis are fleeing across the border to Kenya to escape extreme poverty associated with the country's severe drought, famine and an Islamist insurgency.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Even in the relentless heat and dust of the sprawling Dadaab refugee settlement in northern Kenya, camp residents observe the dawn-to-dusk Ramadan fast.

Hawa Abdi is among them. She is from southern Somalia, a part of the country where famine has been declared by the United Nations. She says she has been a refugee at Dadaab for the past six months and is receiving assistance — but still would like more food and other aid.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
3:38 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Unwed Women Living With Partners Risk More Unplanned Pregnancies

Vicente Barcelo Varona iStockphoto.com

OK, so your mom was right.

It turns out that moving in with that special someone without getting married first puts you at very high risk for an unplanned pregnancy.

That's one of the key findings of a new report from the Guttmacher Institute.

The report found that overall, "the United States did not make progress toward its goal of reducing unintended pregnancy between 2001 and 2006." In fact, the rate was 49 percent in 2006, virtually unchanged from 48 percent in 2001.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
3:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Hospitals Have Got Your Back, Maybe A Little Too Quickly

Is that MRI for back pain necessary?
iStockphoto.com

Back surgery is one of the best documented examples of expensive medical treatments that drive up health care costs while not always helping patients, and sometimes even hurting them.

And the latest Medicare data show that doctors frequently order MRI back scans for patients who haven't tried recommended treatments such as physical therapy. An MRI often prompts surgery.

Read more
Research News
2:57 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

El Nino Seen As Trigger For Violence In The Tropics

This image shows the the above-normal water temperature in the Pacific Ocean during the December 1997 El Nino. Green-blue colors represent normal temperatures; dark red indicates hotter water.
NOAA

Scientists say there's a link between climate and violent conflict.

A statistical analysis of civil conflicts between 1950 and 2004 found that in tropical countries, conflicts were twice as likely to occur in El Nino years. The analysis appears in the journal Nature.

El Nino occurs when there is unusually warm water in the Pacific Ocean near the equator. But it affects weather patterns in tropical countries around the globe.

Read more
Economy
2:21 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

For Corn Farmers, There's Gold In Them There Fields

High grain prices and increasing yields have been an economic windfall for farmers. Low stockpiles, the use in ethanol production and orders from China have driven up demand and are expected to keep corn prices high.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Corn is a mighty hot commodity these days.

Grain prices soared after weather damage across the Corn Belt led the U.S. Department of Agriculture to predict lower yields than previously expected earlier this month.

Some agronomists and farmers predict yields will likely be even lower because of ongoing heat and drought.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
2:00 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

When Forgetfulness Needs Medical Attention

In Pat Summitt's 1999 book Reach for the Summit, what comes through about the legendary University of Tennessee women's basketball coach is her singular toughness.

Summitt, 59, announced yesterday that she has been diagnosed with early onset dementia caused by Alzheimer's. Her grit, it seems, remains intact. She said she will continue coaching as she begins treatment.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Dick Cheney Reveals He Kept A Secret Resignation Letter

Former Vice President Dick Cheney, on November 2010 in Dallas.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

You'll be hearing a lot about former Vice President Dick Cheney in the next couple of weeks. His memoir, In My Life, hits stores Aug. 29. And on that same day, NBC News will air an exclusive interview with Cheney during "Dateline," and another one during "Today" on Aug. 30.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:43 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Gallup: Rick Perry Opens 12-Point Lead Over Mitt Romney

There really is a new sheriff in town or, more precisely, frontrunner in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, and he's Texas Gov. Rick Perry who has opened a 29 percent to 17 percent lead over Mitt Romney with Republican voters, according to a new Gallup poll.

Another interesting result: Rep. Ron Paul of Texas was in third place with 13 percent, clearly placing him in the vaunted top tier. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota was in fourth place at 10 percent.

Read more
Energy
1:23 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Restarting Libya's Valuable Oil Exports Won't Be Easy

A Libyan rebel stands guard at the entrance to the Zawiya oil refinery, about 30 miles west of Tripoli, on Aug. 19. Libyan rebels taken complete control of the key oil refinery. Before the conflict, Libya supplied 2 percent of the world's oil, but restarting oil field operations won't be a simple task.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

The light at the end of the tunnel for Libyans isn't just an end to the Moammar Gadhafi regime — it's also "light sweet crude."

Oil provides most of Libya's income. But the revolution there has strangled exports for months and starved the country of revenue and also temporarily bumped up world oil prices. So there's a lot of interest inside Libya and internationally in getting the country's oil wells up and running again.

The question is, when?

Read more
Technology
1:14 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Child Pornography Bill Makes Privacy Experts Skittish

Late last month, while Washington, D.C., was focused on the debt ceiling, the House Judiciary Committee approved legislation that could have long-term consequences on Internet privacy.

The bill requires all Internet service providers to save their customers' IP addresses — or online identity numbers — for a year. The bill's stated purpose is to help police find child pornographers, but critics say that's just an excuse for another step toward Big Brother.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:10 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Romney To Skip DeMint's S. Carolina Labor Day Candidates' Forum

Mitt Romney signaled Wednesday that he doesn't see South Carolina as key to the presidential nomination. His campaign said he won't attend Sen. Jim DeMint's South Carolina Labor Day forum for presidential candidates.

A Romney spokesman cited scheduling conflicts. But by not attending the South Carolina event, Romney fuels speculation that his strategy may be to invest significantly less of himself in the Palmetto State than he did in 2008.

Read more
Space
12:33 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Russian Cargo Spacecraft Fails To Reach Orbit

An unmanned Russian cargo spacecraft taking cargo to the International Space Station encountered a malfunction minutes after launch Wednesday and pieces of it crashed back to Earth.

The Progress was loaded with nearly three tons of food, fuel and other supplies as it lifted off right on time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. But Russian flight control teams lost communications with the vehicle about five minutes into the flight.

Read more

Pages