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1:22 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

King Friend: Democrats Should 'Love Their Enemies'

The unveiling of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial in Washington, D.C., this week has brought attention to the slain leader's former lieutenants, many of whom became iconic figures in the civil rights movement.

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Business
1:14 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

A 'Good Deal' For BofA, A 'Great Deal' For Buffett

Warren Buffett came to the rescue of Bank of America, the giant financial services company that faces a range of legal and financial problems. Buffett said Thursday he would invest $5 billion in the company and could buy more shares down the road. Buffett's decision to buy into Bank of America sent its share price higher, though the company still has to contend with big challenges.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

A Look Inside Gadhafi's Bunkers

Through people who have visited Col. Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli talked about the miles of hallways and bunkers built below ground, no images had ever been seen of them.

As Mark noted earlier, now that the rebels control the complex it is being explored and ransacked. And today, we got images of those legendary tunnels. In this Al Jazeera report, you'll see video of one of those tunnels at around the 1:25 mark:

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Shots - Health Blog
11:45 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Report: Vaccines Are Safe, Hazards Few And Far Between

Pharmacist Kristy Hennessee administers a vaccination against whooping cough at a Walgreen's pharmacy in Pasadena, Calif. last year.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Vaccines do come with risks for trouble, but problems are generally rare, according to a new review of the evidence from the Institute of Medicine.

The independent panel considered adverse effects from eight common childhood vaccines, and found that in many cases there wasn't enough evidence to if say there was a problem. But the committee came out loud and clear on the controversial question which drove the report.

Do vaccines — such as the one against measles, mumps and rubella — cause autism?

Nope.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Thu August 25, 2011

A Shade Of Yellow: Steve Jobs And Attention To Detail

No doubt there are plenty of career retrospectives about the just-departed Apple CEO Steve Jobs today. He did, afterall, lead Apple to become the world's premiere technology company and for a few moments earlier this month, Apple surpassed Exxon Mobil as the most valuable American company.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Report: Obama Administration Looking At Refinancing Plans For Mortages

The New York Times has a report about a government plan that could affect millions of homeowners in the United States. The paper reports that the Obama administration is kicking around a proposal that would "allow millions of homeowners with government-backed mortgages to refinance them at today's lower interest rates, about 4 percent..."

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Politics
10:07 am
Thu August 25, 2011

In Summer Of Angry Voters, Whither The Town Hall?

For members of Congress, August can be a time to reconnect with voters back home. One favorite way to do so has been the town hall meeting.

But this year, with voters angrier than ever, many lawmakers are choosing not to hold those meetings.

In Minnesota, one Republican freshman is trying to navigate his district's political currents.

'I Will Do My Best'

When he was running for Congress last year, Chip Cravaack told the same story, over and over, about how a town hall meeting — or the lack of one — had gotten him into politics.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Merkel Back At No. 1 On Forbes' List Of World's Most Powerful Women

German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Wednesday (Aug. 23, 2011) in Belgrade.
Andrej Isakovic AFP/Getty Images

After a dip to No. 4 last year, German Chancellor Angela Merkel is back at No. 1 on Forbes magazine's annual "World's Most Powerful Women" list.

Merkel's four-year run atop the rankings was broken last year by Michelle Obama. But this year, by Forbes' reasoning, the first lady came in at No. 8.

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Thu August 25, 2011

India's Prime Minister Asks Anti-Corruption Activist To End His Fast

Anna Hazare, a 74-year old anti-corruption crusader in India, is on the 10th day of a hunger strike. Today Prime Minister Manmohan Singh asked him to end his hunger strike saying parliament could discuss anti-corruption legislation.

Reuters reports:

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Crisis In The Housing Market
9:10 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Foreclosures A Third Of Sales; Mortgage Rates Rise

Foreclosure sales, which include homes purchased after they received a notice of default or that were repossessed by lenders, accounted for 31 percent of the market in the April-June quarter, RealtyTrac Inc. said.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Foreclosures made up roughly one-third of all home sales this spring. While that's a smaller share of sales from the previous quarter, it's six times the percentage of foreclosures in a healthy housing market. Meanwhile, fixed mortgage rates edged up this week from their lowest levels in decades.

Foreclosure sales, which include homes purchased after they received a notice of default or that were repossessed by lenders, accounted for 31 percent of the market in the April-June quarter, foreclosure listing firm RealtyTrac Inc. said Thursday.

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Conflict In Libya
9:02 am
Thu August 25, 2011

What Should The U.S. Do Next In Libya?

Libyan rebels remove the green flags from poles at the Abu Salim square in Tripoli on Aug. 26 after the opposition forces announced the transfer of their leadership to the capital.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:31 am

With Moammar Gadhafi and his regime driven from their strongholds in Tripoli, the most pressing question now is whether the rebels will be able to set up a government and establish order in the capital and the rest of Libya.

In their battle so far, the rebels have been boosted by NATO air power. Western nations have also been providing political and diplomatic backing to the rebel leadership, known as the Transitional National Council. And the U.S. and European states say they are prepared to return Libyan assets that were frozen in the final months of Gadhafi's rule.

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Monkey See
8:53 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Steve Jobs And The Cultural Apple

Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivers the keynote address at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference in June 2011. Jobs announced on August 24 that he would step down immediately as CEO of Apple.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

When Steve Jobs stepped down from his position as CEO of Apple yesterday, he handed the reins immediately to chief operating officer Tim Cook, who has had such a significant hand in day-to-day operations that many expect that Apple won't immediately suffer much in the way of effects on either its ability to turn out beloved products or its business position.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Thu August 25, 2011

In Gadhafi's Compound: A Condoleezza Rice Photo Album

Guns. Cars. Artwork. Statues.

And an album full of photos of former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

Odd as that may sound, what appears to be something of a keepsake about Rice — who Moammar Gadhafi once referred to as "my darling black African woman" and of whom he said, "I love her very much" — was found by opposition fighters as they searched and ransacked the Libyan leader's compound in Tripoli.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Warren Buffett Invests $5 Billion In Bank Of America; Stock Soars

Shares in Bank of America jumped nearly 25 percent in"premarket trading" this morning after it was reported that billionaire investment guru Warren Buffett is buying a $5 billion stake in the company, The Wall Street Journal's MarketBeat blog writes.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Cheney: I Urged Bush To Bomb Syria

Former Vice President Dick Cheney. (Feb. 10, 2011, file photo.)
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu August 25, 2011 7:52 am

"Former Vice President Dick Cheney says in a new memoir that he urged President George W. Bush to bomb a suspected Syrian nuclear reactor site in June 2007," The New York Times reports this morning.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week; Verizon Strike A Factor

The number of people filing first-time claims for unemployment benefits rose by 5,000 last week from the week before, to 417,000, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

Though the number of claims remained well above the level normally associated with a healthy economy, one factor was temporary. According to Reuters, "Verizon workers filed 8,500 claims for jobless benefits last week, after submitting 12,500 applications the previous week."

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The Two-Way
6:10 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Markets Rise On More Hopeful Economic Outlook

The Two-Way
5:55 am
Thu August 25, 2011

'International Effort' Underway To Find Gadhafi

Surveillance aircraft provided by the U.S. and, according to British media reports, special forces from the U.K., are helping in the hunt for Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, who is in Tripoli, reported for Morning Edition earlier today.

"It's an all-out effort" as opposition fighters, with help from their international allies, look for Gadhafi, she added.

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The Two-Way
5:30 am
Thu August 25, 2011

Hurricane Watches Up In N.C. As Irene Chugs Toward U.S.

Irene's latest projected path.
National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Irene has "roared across the Bahamas archipelago" and remains on track to hit the coast of North Carolina on Saturday and then soak much of the Eastern seaboard over the weekend and into next week as it chugs north.

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The Two-Way
5:00 am
Thu August 25, 2011

As Apple's Steve Jobs Steps Down, Tim Cook Steps Up

Tim Cook, who is Apple's new CEO. (Oct. 20, 2010, file photo.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The news last night that Apple Inc. co-founder and visionary Steve Jobs is giving up his post at CEO naturally leads to this question:

Just who is Tim Cook, the Apple chief operating officer who has been tapped to take over as CEO?

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

New U.S. Deportation Policy Spares Some

Immigrants and their lawyers are beginning to see the effects of the White House policy announced last week that downgrades some deportation cases.

The Department of Homeland Security says it hasn't officially begun to prioritize all 300,000 cases before the nation's immigration courts, but prosecutors are definitely employing newfound discretion.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Grizzlies Test Products To Keep Out The Average Bear

Last summer marked an all-time high for human-bear conflicts in Yellowstone. The number of grizzly bears there has tripled since they were placed on the endangered species list in the mid-1970s.

But in a strange twist, many of the bears that were involved in conflicts with humans are now helping people to not lure bears into temptation.

Hooked On Human Food

Grizzly bears are a way of life in the northwest corner of Wyoming.

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U.S.
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Puerto Rican Governor Faces Opposition To Pipeline

Demonstrators march during a May 1 protest against the proposed construction of a 92-mile gas pipeline in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Fortuno has made the project a central goal of his administration, despite protest from communities affected.
Ricardo Alcaraz AP

If you think your monthly electric bills are high, be thankful you don't live in Puerto Rico. An island where nearly all energy sources must be imported, the U.S. territory has residential power costs that are double those on the mainland.

To help bring down the cost of energy, Puerto Rico's governor is pushing an ambitious plan to build a 92-mile-long natural gas pipeline.

But that plan has run into significant opposition in Puerto Rico and in Congress.

Homes In The Pipeline's Path

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Better A You Than Me: Scientists Sicken Mosquitoes To Stop Dengue

Researchers hope to keep the mosquito that transmits dengue, Aedes aegypti, from infecting humans using the Wolbachia bacterium.
James Gathany CDC Public Health Image Library

Scientists in Australia are using a bacterium to try to stop a deadly virus in its tracks.

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Science
10:01 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Mosquito Research Feels Bite Of Budget Cuts

Tara Hannon empties a mosquito trap at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven, Conn. Federal funding helped expand this program, but there have been significant cuts over the past five years.
Craig LeMoult

State laboratories around the country are testing mosquitoes to warn people about the presence of the West Nile virus, but federal and state budget cuts are threatening some of those labs.

Abbott Brush collects mosquitoes for observation at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. One mosquito trap — a bucket of smelly water — is in a wooded area of New Haven near a pond.

"It attracts them because they want to come there and lay the eggs," he says.

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The Two-Way
5:38 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Justice Dept. To Probe If News Corp. Hacked 9/11 Families

Attorney General Eric Holder
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 25, 2011 4:37 am

Attorney General Eric Holder and senior FBI officials on Wednesday told relatives of people who died in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks that they had opened a preliminary criminal investigation into allegations the victims' phones had been hacked by News Corp.

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Technology
4:47 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Apple CEO Steve Jobs To Step Down

Apple said CEO Steve Jobs has resigned. He will be replaced by chief operating officer Tim Cook. Jobs has been elected Apple's chairman.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Steve Jobs, the mind behind the iPhone, iPad and other devices that turned Apple Inc. into one of the world's most powerful companies, resigned as the company's CEO Wednesday, saying he can no longer handle the job.

The move appears to be the result of an unspecified medical condition for which he took an indefinite leave from his post in January. Apple's chief operating officer, Tim Cook, has been named CEO.

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The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Samsung Objects To iPad Patent Saying Stanley Kubrick Came Up With It First

Talking Point Memo's Idea Lab points us to a novel legal argument by Samsung.

The Korean electronics maker is arguing that Apple has no right to its D'889 Patent on its iPad, because Stanley Kubrick showed off the idea in his 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey.

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Conflict In Libya
3:59 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

Libyan Rebels Struggle To Impose Order On Tripoli

Libyan rebels remove the green flags from poles at the Abu Salim square in Tripoli on Aug. 26 after the opposition forces announced the transfer of their leadership to the capital.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:30 am

Packed into cars and pickup trucks, Libya's rebels honked their horns and fired into the air as they paraded through Tripoli's central square on Wednesday in a show of force and celebration.

Some fighters deliberately targeted the ancient stone walls of the old city that flank the square — apparently because Moammar Gadhafi used the ramparts as a podium while giving speeches. And everyone is now calling it Martyrs Square, rather than Green Square, which was Gadhafi's term.

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Africa
3:42 pm
Wed August 24, 2011

No Relief In Sight For Somali Refugees In Kenya

Women and children at the Dadaab refugee complex in Kenya line up Aug. 24 to receive ifthar — a meal of rice, meat and vegetables to break the Ramadan fast. Somalis are fleeing across the border to Kenya to escape extreme poverty associated with the country's severe drought, famine and an Islamist insurgency.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Even in the relentless heat and dust of the sprawling Dadaab refugee settlement in northern Kenya, camp residents observe the dawn-to-dusk Ramadan fast.

Hawa Abdi is among them. She is from southern Somalia, a part of the country where famine has been declared by the United Nations. She says she has been a refugee at Dadaab for the past six months and is receiving assistance — but still would like more food and other aid.

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