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10:01 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

After Quake, Japanese Fishing Port Remains At Risk

Most of Kesennuma's large fishing boats either survived the tsunami or have been repaired. But many do not move from the dock, because most of the city's fish-processing factories still lie in ruins.
Frank Langfitt NPR

At first glance, the Japanese fishing port of Kesennuma looks like it's making a comeback from last March's devastating tsunami. A half-dozen fishing boats arrive one morning in this city of 70,000 and unload tons of bonito onto a partially rebuilt port.

The fish roll down a conveyor, beneath a fresh-water shower, and splash into plastic bins filled with ice water. Mitsuo Iwabuchi, a wholesaler bidding on the catch, says the port is improving, but the infrastructure that drives it, including scores of fish-processing and ice-making factories, still lies in ruins.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Ala. Businesses Riled By State's New Immigration Law

The dispute over immigration policy is being fought in an Alabama federal court Wednesday.

The state's Republican leaders say they passed the toughest immigration bill in the country to preserve jobs for Alabamians. But critics say the law goes too far, criminalizing all kinds of contact with undocumented residents and putting an extra burden on small business.

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The Two-Way
5:07 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Legendary Women's Basketball Coach Pat Summitt Diagnosed With Alzheimer's

Pat Summitt, college basketball's winningest coach, said in an interview that she had been diagnosed with early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type.

The legendary coach, who has 1,071 career victories and eight national championships as the University of Tennessee's women's basketball coach, also said she would continue coaching.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:08 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Medicare Trying Bundled Payments To Save Money, Improve Care

iStockphoto.com

For all those who say there's nothing in the Affordable Care Act that could reduce health care spending, this one's for you.

Medicare officials have unveiled the latest initiative to spring from last year's overhaul, and it's one some health economists have been lusting after for years: Bundling payments so that hospitals, doctors, and even post-hospital caregivers all have the same financial incentive to both work together and provide cost-effective care.

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Why A Quake In Virginia Isn't As Rare As It Sounds

Nelson Hsu NPR

The earthquake that rattled the East Coast Tuesday afternoon, from its Virginia epicenter to Washington and the islands off Massachusetts, was, indeed, rare, geologists say.

But only because of its size; at a magnitude of 5.8, it was the largest temblor to hit Virginia since 1897, when the largest quake on record, a 5.9 quake, struck.

"Earthquakes in central Virginia are not very unusual," says David Spears, Virginia's state geologist. "We have them every few years, but they're usually in the two-to-four magnitude range."

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

After Quake, Rush To Phone Loved Ones Overwhelmed Networks

People reach for their cellphones outside the courthouse in Manhattan after an earthquake rattled the East Coast on Tuesday.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

After an earthquake shook the East Coast on Tuesday, many people reached for their cellphones and tried to call loved ones. And many couldn't get through — but it wasn't the earthquake's fault.

No damaged cell towers or wires were reported by the major mobile carriers following the quake, which struck just before 2 p.m. EST and registered a magnitude of 5.8 at its epicenter in Virginia.

So what caused the problems?

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Africa
2:57 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

A New Obstacle To Normal Relations For Sudan, U.S.

Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir speaks of the capital Khartoum on July 12. Sudan says it should be taken off the U.S. terrorism list, but Washington says it is concerned about new fighting in the south of the country.
Ashraf Shazly AFP/Getty Images

When Sudan allowed South Sudan to become an independent nation last month, it hoped this would put an end to years of friction with the United States.

More specifically, Sudan desperately wanted to be removed from Washington's list of state sponsors of terrorism and get out from under the many sanctions that come along with that designation.

But now the U.S. and the United Nations are raising concerns about fighting, and possible atrocities, near the border between Sudan and South Sudan.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:53 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Eating More Nuts And Soy May Help Beat High Cholesterol

Got high cholesterol? Soybeans might help.
iStockphoto.com

If you've got high cholesterol, you know the diet advice: Go easy on foods high in saturated fat like red meat and cheese, and eat lots of fiber and whole grains.

The message still holds up, but researchers say it's time to tweak the message.

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Law
2:53 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Clergy Sue To Stop Alabama's Immigration Law

Alabama's new immigration law gets its first test in federal court Wednesday.

The Justice Department and civil rights groups are suing to stop what's considered to be the toughest illegal immigration crackdown coming out of the states.

But the law is also being challenged from a Bible Belt institution.

'It Goes Against Tenets Of Our Christian Faith'

At First United Methodist Church in downtown Birmingham, clergy from around the city take turns leading a prayer service called in response to the new immigration law.

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Africa
2:40 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

A New Libyan Leadership Could Recover Billions

A young Libyan in Benghazi celebrates Tuesday over news that Moammar Gadhafi's rule appears to be at an end. The U.S. says it is prepared to unfreeze Libyan assets quickly and make them available to a new government.
Alexandre Meneghini AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:31 am

The United States wants to give Libya its money back.

The U.S. froze some $30 billion worth of the country's assets after leader Moammar Gadhafi launched a harsh crackdown on his opponents earlier this year. With Gadhafi's rule now near or at its end, U.S. officials and their European counterparts are prepared to quickly unfreeze those funds for a new Libyan leadership.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:29 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Feds Launch App Contest For Facebook 'Lifelines' In Health Emergencies

The first thing East Coasters did when the ground began to shake this afternoon wasn't duck under their desks, but to turn to their smartphones.

The 5.8 magnitude earthquake that was felt from Durham, N.C., to Toronto was documented instantly through social media like Facebook and Twitter.

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

VIDEO: White House, Capitol As Earthquake Hits

The AP has just provided this video of the White House and the Capitol as the 5.8 magnitude earthquake hit the East Coast. Make sure you watch the roof closely as the security detail reacts to the rumbling:

Update at 4:17 p.m. ET. Earthquake Interrupts DSK Press Conference:

Here's another video of the earthquake interrupting a press conference with Dominique Strauss-Kahn's lawyer:

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

5.9 Magnitude Earthquake Rattles East Coast

A 5.9 magnitude earthquake rattled the east coast of the United States, today. The tremor was felt at least as far north as New York and at least as far south as Virginia.

The United States Geological Survey says the earthquake happened at 1:51 p.m. ET with an epicenter nine miles south of Mineral, Virginia and had a depth of 1 km.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:43 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Patients Getting Faster Treatment For Heart Attacks

iStockphoto.com

When it comes to treating heart attacks, doing the right thing doesn't count for much if doctors dawdle.

For a heart attack caused by a sudden blockage of an artery that feeds the pumping muscle, cardiologists agree that busting it up with an inflatable catheter should be done as soon as possible. The goal: treatment within 90 minutes of the patient arriving at the hospital.

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U.S.
10:26 am
Tue August 23, 2011

New Rules Aim For More Passenger-Friendly Skies

Passengers wait in line at the United Airlines terminal at Chicago's O'Hare airport in 2009 after a computer malfunction caused long delays and the cancellation of some United flights.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Anyone who flies on an airplane should like some new government regulations that took effect Tuesday. Passengers who get involuntarily bumped will be entitled to more compensation, and airlines face stiffer penalties for long tarmac delays on international flights.

The new rules are aimed at making flying more convenient and hassle-free, according to the Department of Transportation. Secretary Ray LaHood says the new passenger protections will "help ensure that air travelers receive the respect they deserve before, during and after their flight."

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Judge Dismisses Charges Against Dominique Strauss-Kahn

A New York judge dismissed the sexual assault case against the former head of the International Monetary Fund. The AP reports that the ruling won't take effect, however, until an appeals court hears the accuser's request for a special prosecutor.

Yesterday, prosecutors asked the judge to drop the charges against Dominique Strauss-Kahn, because of issues with the credibility of his accuser.

The AP adds:

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Africa
10:00 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Fighting Rages On Inside Tripoli

Rebels recently swept inside Libya's capital. They're facing pockets of violent resistance from forces loyal to Colonel Moammar Gadhafi. To learn about the battle for Tripoli and what a post-Gadhafi era may mean for the region, host Michel Martin speaks with a representative of the Libyan Transitional National Council and Al Jazeera International's Washington Bureau Chief.

U.S.
10:00 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Changes To Immigration Policy: Fairness Or Phony Amnesty?

The Obama administration is planning to review about 300,000 illegal immigration cases and prioritize deportations of undocumented individuals with criminal records. Those who haven't committed crimes may be allowed to apply for work permits in the U.S. Host Michel Martin discusses the new policy rule with Rep. Charles Gonzales (D-Texas), who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, student Mario Perez, and his attorney Sarah Monty.

Pop Culture
10:00 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Beauty Shop: DSK, Kardashian, 'Colombiana'

Prosecutors are requesting that sexual assault charges against former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn be dropped. Reality TV star Kim Kardashian and NBA player Kris Humphries recently celebrated their multimillion dollar wedding. And an action film staring Zoe Saldana is hitting theaters Friday. The Beauty Shop women discuss these headlines with host Michel Martin.

The Two-Way
9:59 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Coulson Received Payment From News Corp., After Taking Downing Street Job

Andy Coulson, formerly editor of the tabloid News of the World, and later David Cameron's director of communications, speaks on a mobile phone in London on April 13, 2010. London police arrested Andy Coulson on July 8 in relation to Britain's tabloid phone-hacking scandal.
Oli Scarff AP

Britain's phone hacking scandal took another sharp turn today, after the BBC reported that a former editor at News of the World received payment from News International, even after he took a job as the Prime Minister's top press aide.

The BBC reports:

These payments were part of his severance package, under what is known as a "compromise agreement".

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Crisis In The Housing Market
9:05 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Racial Gap In Homeownership Widens In U.S. Slump

Clyde Jackson (right) poses for a photo with his son, Clyde Jr., outside their new two-bedroom apartment in Greenbelt, Md. Jackson lost his three-bedroom home to foreclosure in December.
Alex Kellogg NPR

When Clyde Jackson's wife took a $6 hourly pay cut several years ago, it was the beginning of his rapid descent from two-time homeowner to renter in an apartment complex in the working-class Washington, D.C., suburb of Greenbelt, Md.

Jackson, 51, is an African-American father of three who works for a local government sanitation agency. In December, he lost a three-bedroom brick home to foreclosure. He purchased the house for $245,000 in 2004.

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News
8:54 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Behind King Memorial, One Fraternity's Long Battle

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial opened to the public on Monday. It will be officially dedicated on Sunday.
Allison Keyes NPR

The thousands of visitors at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington this week will reflect on the controversial likeness of the man, his legacy and the significance of the first nonpresident — and first African-American — immortalized on the National Mall.

But most of them probably won't know who built it.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Tue August 23, 2011

New Home Sales Decline To Five-Month Low In July

Two years into the economic recovery, the housing market is still showing signs of struggle. New numbers released by the Commerce Department today showed that purchases of new homes fell 0.7 percent in July and hit the lowest level in five months.

Bloomberg reports:

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Lager's Key Yeast May Have Come From Argentina

An Argentinian heritage? Scientists say the key yeast in lager may have originated in Patagonia.
Robert Sullivan AFP/Getty Images

We have to confess we didn't know that for decades, scientists have been trying to find the "parent yeast" that makes lager beer possible.

Apparently they were.

And now, they may have an answer: Beech forests in Argentina.

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Quakes Rattle Southern Colorado, Northern New Mexico

The locations of the quakes.
U.S. Geological Survey

"The largest earthquake to strike Colorado in almost 40 years" shook buildings but apparently caused little damage late last night, Denver's ABC 7 News reports. A few homes may have been damaged and some rock slides were reported.

It was a 5.3 magnitude temblor and the epicenter was "about 180 miles south of Denver."

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Moth Was OK (Player Was Too) After Getting Stuck In Outfielder's Ear

Ouch. Matt Holliday of the St. Louis Cardinals as he left the field Monday night with a moth stuck in his right ear.
MLB.com

Well, at least the moth was OK when it was pulled out of St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday's ear Monday night.

According to the Post Dispatch, Holliday even took the little critter home with him.

We can't vouch for its fate after that.

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Seventh Victim Of Indiana Stage Collapse Dies; Families Try To Cope

Aug. 13, 2011: A stage collapses at the Indiana State Fair in Indianapolis. Seven people have died from the injuries they received.
Joey Foley Getty Images

"The families of those who were seriously hurt when the Indiana State Fair Grandstand stage rigging collapsed" on Aug. 13, are struggling with "a mix of hoping and coping," The Indianapolis Star writes this morning.

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Hurricane Irene Gaining Strength; Japan Expecting New Prime Minister

The projected path puts the center of the storm over North Carolina at 2 a.m. ET on Sunday.
National Hurricane Center

Good morning.

The fight for control of Tripoli continues, as we reported earlier. From Libya, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports that what had looked like it might be a quick victory for opponents of Moammar Gadhafi is turning into what could be "a bitter, difficult battle."

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Africa
5:23 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Libya Rebels Renew Fight To Pry Tripoli From Regime

Libyan rebels remove the green flags from poles at the Abu Salim square in Tripoli on Aug. 26 after the opposition forces announced the transfer of their leadership to the capital.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:31 am

Libyan rebels seized control of Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound Tuesday after NATO airstrikes blasted a hole in an outer wall.

Hundreds of fighters poured inside the fortress-like complex and raised the opposition flag over Gadhafi's personal residence. The Libyan leader and his family were nowhere to be found, however.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, reporting from inside the compound, said the rebels were firing weapons into the air and that civilians were streaming in by the thousands to join in the celebration.

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The Two-Way
5:20 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Fighting Flares In Tripoli

Young boys on a dark street in Tripoli late last night (Aug. 22, 2011). Fighting flared again today in the Libyan capital.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

The situation in Libya remains very fluid. As NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro said on Morning Edition, there was "a stunning turn of events" on Monday.

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