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Religion
1:50 pm
Fri August 5, 2011

Heat Wave Tests Muslims During Ramadan

Muslims pray together on the evening of the first day of Ramadan at the Islamic Center of Greater Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

As a heat wave grips large parts of the country, ask yourself this: Would you turn down a glass of water? If you're Muslim, you probably would, because it is the month of Ramadan, when Muslims can't eat or drink from sunup to sundown.

It's a bit of a challenge, says Omar Shahin, an imam in Phoenix. At that moment, it was 105 degrees outside, and he was cleaning the pool in his backyard. The water was so close, yet so far.

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The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Fri August 5, 2011

$8 Billion: What This Week's Market Losses Cost The World's Richest Man

Anyone who has a 401K knows that market fluctuations of the kind that have rattled world markets this past week show up significantly on quarterly statements.

Well, imagine what it does to the wealth of the wealthiest man in the world. According to analysis conducted by Bloomberg, Carlos Slim, the Mexican telecom magnate, lost $8 billion in past four days. Bloomberg reports:

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Shots - Health Blog
1:08 pm
Fri August 5, 2011

Americans Support Bans On Food Allergens In Public Places

Peanuts were a problem for 9 percent of households that reported someone with a food allergy or intolerance.
iStockphoto.com

If some foods really don't agree with you or someone you live with, you've got plenty of company.

In the latest NPR-Thomson Reuters Health Poll, we asked people across the country about food allergies and intolerance. The bottom line: 1 in 5 households across the country has at least one person who is allergic or intolerant to at least one food.

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Middle East
1:02 pm
Fri August 5, 2011

In Syria, Hama Residents Document Fierce Crackdown

A screen grab of a YouTube video shows smoke rising in what appears to be a contested part of Hama, Syria.
YouTube user "revosyria"

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:35 am

The residents of Hama, a religiously conservative city in central Syria, have a bitter history with the Assad family that has ruled the country for four decades.

Government opponents rose up in 1982 against Hafez Assad, the former president, and he responded with massive military force that reduced parts of the city to rubble. It took weeks for details to reach the wider world, and there has never been a full accounting. But human-rights groups estimate that anywhere from 10,000 to 25,000 people were killed.

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Media
1:00 pm
Fri August 5, 2011

CNN's Morgan Under Pressure Amid Hacking Scandal

CNN's Piers Morgan is under growing pressure to return to the U.K. to face questions about whether the Daily Mirror engaged in hacking voicemails while he was editor.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

For years, CNN's Piers Morgan has alternately prospered and flopped on the basis of how readily his roguish charm could get him out of scrapes.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Obama Outlines Plan To Spur Hiring Of Veterans

President Obama outlined his plan to help veterans find jobs Friday, calling for better training for demobilized soldiers and tax credits for employers who hire them. In June, there were 1 million unemployed veterans in America, and the jobless rate for post-Sept. 11 veterans stood at 13.3 percent — about four points higher than the national average.

Ari Shapiro filed this report for Newscast:

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Jury Finds Five Officers Guilty In Deadly New Orleans Bridge Shooting

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 5:27 pm

A federal jury found five former New Orleans police officers guilty of civil rights violations in connection to the shooting deaths of two men on the Danziger Bridge in New Orleans. The shootings took place during the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

The AP reports:

"All five officers were convicted Friday of charges stemming from the cover-up of the shootings. The four who had been charged with civil rights violations in the shootings were convicted on all counts.

"However, the jury decided that neither fatal shooting was a murder.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Fri August 5, 2011

L.A. School District Rehires 450 Teachers Laid Off In June

The Los Angeles school district has rehired 450 elementary school teachers who had been laid off in June. The AP reports that the jobs were restored after "a combination of retirements, resignations, dismissals and a four-day furlough agreement with the teachers union allowed the district to rescind the layoffs."

The layoffs were part of massive job cuts instituted this summer, as Los Angeles dealt with state funding cuts. Although the school district has rehired 4,170 teachers and support staff since those initial cuts were made, some 1,450 personnel remain laid off.

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Around the Nation
10:00 am
Fri August 5, 2011

President Obama: 'Nobody's Boy'?

The President was recently referred to as "your boy" by MSNBC's Pat Buchanan, and his debt ceiling policy was called a "tar baby" by Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.). Also in the week's news: July gained 117,000 jobs and MTV hit 30 years on the air. Weighing in are the Barbershop guys: author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, Republican strategist Ron Christie, and professor Mark Lamont Hill.

Economy
10:00 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Latest Job Gains Enough To Cure Economy?

Federal statistics show the U.S. gained 117,000 jobs in July, and unemployment dropped to 9.1 percent. Financial journalist Stacey Tisdale discusses what these numbers mean for the national economy's long-term health, and Rep. Chakah Fattah describes how his Pa. district compares to the rest of the U.S.

Politics
9:57 am
Fri August 5, 2011

The Next D.C. Guessing Game: Who's On Debt Panel?

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) could land a seat on the debt panel.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Congress avoided a federal default this week by raising the debt ceiling in exchange for promised spending reductions, but it ceded the difficult details to a new 12-member "super committee."

If reaction to the bipartisan panel of Senate and House members, yet to be appointed, is any measure, its chances of agreeing on ways to reduce the nation's deficit by $1.5 trillion over the next decade are slim — no matter who gets picked to serve.

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The Two-Way
9:52 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Comcast Announces $10 Web Access For Low-Income Families

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 9:30 am

Cable and Internet provider Comcast is launching a new initiative aimed at bridging the digital divide, offering discounted web access and home computers to families that meet income requirements.

The plan, called Internet Essentials, will be available wherever Comcast offers Internet services — which it currently does in 39 states. The company has launched websites in English and Spanish to promote the program.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:51 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Salmonella Outbreak Reignites Debate Over Antibiotics In Food Supply

With one death and 77 people reported ill, the latest foodborne illness outbreak has led to one of the largest recalls in U.S. history. Food giant Cargill has been forced to pull a staggering 36 million pounds of ground turkey from the market. And the victims in this case have gotten very sick — almost one-third have ended up in the hospital.

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The Two-Way
9:33 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Polygamists Condemn Warren Jeffs' Sexual Abuse

As a Texas jury considers a possible life sentence for polygamist leader Warren Jeffs, a coalition of polygamist groups is condemning the sexual abuse that led to Jeffs' conviction.

"We are alarmed that such depravity could have been perpetrated by anyone," says a written statement from the Principle Rights Coalition, a group representing five polygamist groups in Arizona and Utah, as well as "numerous other independent Fundamentalist Mormons."

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Opinion
9:15 am
Fri August 5, 2011

New Republic: Ceiling Up, Global Stocks Down

After the debt ceiling was raised Sunday it wasn't just America that felt the economic blow.
iStockphoto.com

Peter Boone is a principal at Salute Capital Management and non-resident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics (PIIE). Simon Johnson is the Ronald A. Kurtz Professor of Entrepreneurship at MIT's Sloan School of Management and Senior Fellow at PIIE.

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Opinion
9:14 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Weekly Standard: Pin The Tail On The Economy

Pundits are wondering if some leaders are blind to America's economic reality.
iStockphoto.com

Mark Hemingway is an editorial page writer for the Washington Examiner.

Much to the frustration of the press corps and the country at large, President Obama went nearly a year without giving a press conference at a time when the country was in a rather precarious state economically and politically. Lately, however it seems that Obama has decided that the debt ceiling debate is the time to reengage — no doubt the looming campaign has something to do with this decision.

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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Fri August 5, 2011

'Rent Is Too Damn High' Candidate Faces Eviction

Jimmy McMillan of the Rent is Too Damn High Party speaks during the gubernatorial debate at Hofstra University in Oct. 2010.
Getty Images

The man who ran for New York governor with the simple message of "the rent is too damn high," is facing eviction from his rent-controlled apartment, because, he says, his "rent is too damn low."

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NPR Story
8:41 am
Fri August 5, 2011

How European Money Woes Could Stall U.S. Economy

Originally published on Fri August 5, 2011 3:06 pm

The nations belonging to the euro currency zone have been struggling with a debt crisis for more than a year. The wealthier nations — notably, Germany — have helped bail out the troubled nations, including Greece, Ireland and Portugal.

Yet these smaller countries have not solved their financial problems, and there is now a growing fear that the debt problems are spreading to the much larger economies of Spain and Italy.

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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Polar Bear Kills British Tourist In Norway's Arctic

An injured person is carried from a helicopter in Longyearbyen after a polar bear killed one person and left four other members of a British group seriously injured.
Thomas Lysgaard AFP/Getty Images

An adventure trip to the arctic ended in tragedy for a group of British students, when a starving polar bear attacked the expedition, killing one person and injuring four. The group then shot the bear dead.

The Guardian reports:

The party of around 80 were on a five-week expedition in the Arctic run by the [British Schools Exploring Society], a youth development charity.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Senate Approves FAA Bill, Ending Agency Shutdown

The Senate this morning approved a bill that ends the partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, reports the AP.

As NPR's Brian Naylor reported this morning, the bill is yet another short-term extension of funding that puts off dealing with the issues that prevented an agreement on a longer term deal.

Brian adds:

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Opinion
7:40 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Weekly Standard: A Pastime Passed It's Prime

Joe DiMaggio of the Yankees passes on a few batting tips to his five-and-a-half-year old son, Joseph III, prior to the Yankees — Washington Senators game at Yankee Stadium, New York, April 27, 1947.
JDC AP

Joseph Epstein, a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard, is the author of the forthcoming Gossip, The Untrivial Pursuit.

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Opinion
7:39 am
Fri August 5, 2011

The Nation: Stop The Subsidy-Sucking Sports Stadiums

A coalition of contractors and construction laborers march and rally outside the Barclays Center construction site to protest Bruce Ratner's Atlantic Yards development in Brooklyn, New York on Wednesday, July 27, 2011. Organizers say Ratner's promise of contracts and jobs for community residents have not been kept.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Neil deMause, a journalist based in Brooklyn, New York, is a contributing editor to City Limits, a senior editor for Baseball Prospectus and the ­co-author, with Joanna Cagan, of Field of Schemes.

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The Two-Way
7:31 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Congress Faces Record Disapproval Rating; Chile Sees Violent Protests

Good morning!

We've already touched on the big news of the day: The early plummet of the world markets in reaction to yesterday's dismal performance of the U.S. markets. We also covered the better-than-expected jobs report that buoyed the world markets and have positioned U.S markets to open higher.

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Shots - Health Blog
7:23 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Salty Snacks For Baby? Even Infants May Get Too Much Sodium

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 5, 2011 8:35 am

Salt is a delicious devil ingrained in our diets, with implications for taste and health. Cutting back on salt is a challenge, even for the youngest eaters, it turns out, because processed foods contain so much of the stuff.

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Opinion
6:36 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Foreign Policy: The Expression Of A Revolution

People walk by graffiti showing an arrow pointing at a man, who represents the government, and a hand beating him over the head with a spatula that reads in Arabic "Tahrir" at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, July 23, 2011.
Khalil Hamra AP

Ursula Lindsey is a journalist based in Cairo. She contributes to The Arabist blog.

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The Two-Way
6:34 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Hiring Picks Up Slightly In July; Unemployment Drops To 9.1 Percent

U.S. employers added 117,000 jobs last month, according to new numbers from The Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate dropped to 9.1 percent.

The AP reports:

The mild gain may ease investors' concerns after the Dow Jones industrial average plummeted more than 500 points over concerns that the U.S. may be entering another recession.

Still, the economy needs twice as many net jobs per month to rapidly reduce unemployment. The rate has topped 9 percent in every month except two since the recession officially ended in June 2009.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Fri August 5, 2011

World Markets In Turmoil, As U.S. Awaits Employment Numbers

A day after U.S. markets posted their worst losses since the financial crisis, world markets followed suit. As we explained, yesterday, two big things were on the minds of investors as the big sell-off took place: Worry about a U.S. economy that experts say can swing back into recession and worry that the European debt crisis is spreading to Italy and Spain.

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Economy
4:34 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Wall Street Awaits A Nail-Biter Of A Jobs Report

Investors seeking reason for optimism after the worst stock-market sell-off since the 2008 financial crisis probably won't find it in Friday's July jobs report.

Economists are forecasting that employers added only 90,000 jobs last month and that the unemployment rate was unchanged at 9.2 percent, according to a survey by FactSet.

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Politics
3:02 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Rick Perry's Religious Revival Sparks A Holy War

Texas Gov. Rick Perry looks on during a speech at a Boy Scout ceremony in June aboard the USS Midway in San Diego. At that dinner, he said the federal government is rudderless. Now, he's calling for a "day of prayer and fasting on behalf of our nation."
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Wed August 24, 2011 8:55 am

Rick Perry, the longest-serving governor of Texas, is a Methodist by tradition who, with his wife, Anita, now attends an evangelical megachurch in Austin. He is open about his deep Christian faith.

On Saturday, Perry, who is widely expected to enter the race for the White House, is hosting a religious revival in Houston to pray for what he calls "a nation in crisis."

While the governor claims it's nothing more than a Christian prayer rally, the event has touched off a holy war among critics, who claim it is Jesus-exclusive and political.

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Space
3:00 am
Fri August 5, 2011

New NASA Missions Will Tour The Solar System

The Juno spacecraft, seen above Jupiter in this artist's rendering. Juno's primary mission is to improve our understanding of Jupiter's formation and evolution.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's space shuttle may be down for the count, but robotic planetary missions are up, up and away. Before the end of this year, three new solar system probes are due to launch.

Juno To Jupiter

Why Jupiter? Well it's big. "It's the largest of all the planets. In fact, it's got more material in it than all the rest of the solar system combined," says Scott Bolton, a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute and principal investigator for the Juno mission.

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