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Shots - Health News
3:11 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

California Ballot Measure Pits Doctors Against Lawyers

Alana and Troy Pack died in 2003 when a woman abusing pain pills hit the children with her car. The accident has led to a ballot measure that, among other things, would put new constraints on physicians.
Courtesy of the Pack family

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 4:41 pm

Troy and Alana Pack had spent the day at their neighborhood Halloween party in Danville, a suburb of San Francisco. Ten-year-old Troy went as a baseball player, and 7-year-old Alana was a good witch. In the afternoon, they changed out of their costumes and set out for a walk with their mother. Destination: Baskin-Robbins.

"Alana, she liked anything with chocolate," says their father, Bob Pack. "Troy, for sure, bubble gum ice cream, because he liked counting the bubble gums that he would get."

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The Two-Way
3:03 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

At 113, Woman Lies About Her Age So She Can Join Facebook

Facebook's log-in page currently doesn't allow a date earlier than Jan. 1, 1905, to be selected.
Facebook

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 11:21 am

Since her birth in 1900, Anna Stoehr has seen dramatic shifts in technology. But when the Minnesota woman tried recently to create a Facebook account, she hit a snag. The service's software couldn't handle her advanced age of 113 years old. So she fudged it a bit, and said she was 99.

To put Stoehr's age in context, we'll remind you: She was born three years before the Wright brothers conducted their historic first flight of an airplane in North Carolina.

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Politics
2:52 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Pizza Man Delivers Third-Party Option

North Carolina Libertarian Senate candidate Sean Haugh (center), Sen. Kay Hagan and Republican candidate Thom Tillis attend a debate on Oct. 9. Haugh's tie features a cartoon cat. He says his mom gave it to him.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 4:15 pm

He delivers pizza by night and runs for U.S. Senate by day. Sean Haugh, the Libertarian running for Senate in North Carolina, is among a dozen independent and third-party candidates nationwide who could shake up tight races for Senate and governor.

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Goats and Soda
2:42 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Live Airport Tweets: An NPR Producer's Irregular Ebola Screenings

The sign NPR producer Rebecca Hersher saw as she left Liberia to return to the United States.
Rebecca Hersher For NPR

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 8:33 am

NPR producer Rebecca Hersher has reported on Ebola from Liberia for the past two weeks. She just returned to the U.S. via Brussels and into Washington Dulles International Airport — the same route flown by Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who went on to Dallas, where he was diagnosed with the virus and later died. As Hersher's tweets reveal, she was screened. Sort of.

The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

CDC Says It's Monitoring 77 People Who Had Contact With Ebola Patients

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 3:13 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it is monitoring 77 people who had contact with patients diagnosed with Ebola.

Seventy-six of those, CDC Director Tom Frieden said in a press conference, were health care workers who cared for Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States.

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The Salt
2:35 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

What's Really In A Big Mac? McDonald's Says It's Ready To Tell All

McDonald's still won't reveal the recipe for its secret sauce, but it will show you how that Big Mac patty gets made.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:59 am

Did you hear the one about the McDonald's hamburger that still hadn't decomposed after 14 years?

And "pink slime" — how much goes into McDonald's beef?

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Shots - Health News
2:22 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Nurses Want To Know How Safe Is Safe Enough With Ebola

Nurses were worried about Ebola long before nurse Nina Pham became the first person to become infected with the deadly virus in the United States.Now they're worried and mad. And they've got lots of questions about how to care for future Ebola patients safely.

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Goats and Soda
2:03 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Back On Its Feet, A Liberian Hospital Aims To Keep Ebola Out

Dr. Wvennie MacDonald, the administrator of the JFK Memorial Hospital, has helped put new procedures in place to keep Ebola out, including a triage station to identify possible Ebola patients at the front gate.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 5:13 pm

John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital is the largest public hospital in Liberia. It has a trauma unit, a maternity ward and an outpatient clinic that serves hundreds a day.

But there's one illness that the facility won't treat: Ebola. JFK is not equipped to treat or contain it if it gets inside their wards. A new triage unit in the driveway detects patients with the virus and sends them to a dedicated Ebola center.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

An End to Flight Restrictions In Dallas

A Southwest Airlines flight Boeing 737 flies over Bachman Lake near Dallas (brentdanley/Flickr)

Today is the first day that Dallas airline and aviation officials will not have to contend with the federal law known as the Wright amendment.

For 35 years, the law restricted flights out of Dallas’ Love Field Airport, as a way to protect a fledgling Dallas-Fort Worth airport.

But it was allowed to expire yesterday, after a compromise reached by Southwest, American Airlines, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, and the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Stemming The Flow Of Central American Child Migrants

A police officer in Santa Ana, El Salvador teaches a group of sixth graders how to use computers as part of the GREAT program. (Jude Joffe-Block/KJZZ)

The once staggering number of Central American child migrants crossing the border has fallen dramatically in recent months.

But to discourage future migration flows, experts say the violence and poverty that helped trigger the exodus must be addressed.

In recent years, the U.S. spent $800 million on programs to address drug trafficking, gangs, and crime in Central America. And some of those programs are aimed specifically at helping young people.

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NPR Story
12:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

E.O. Wilson On 'The Meaning Of Human Existence'

Naturalist E.O. Wilson, author of "The Meaning of Human Existence." (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Biologist and naturalist E.O. Wilson has written thirty books, won two Pulitzers, holds the title Professor Emeritus at Harvard and he is the world’s leading authority on ants.

Ants are featured in his new book, “The Meaning of Human Existence,” which has been longlisted for the National Book Award.

The book covers evolution, the coming of human consciousness, and humans’ ability to think about existence.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Survey: Latin America Ranks Last In Respect For Women

Demonstrators call for more protection for women in Colombia last spring. Only 20 percent of respondents in the country said they feel women are respected there. One protester holds a sign reading "Woman, neither submissive, nor devout. I want you free, pretty and crazy."
Raul Arboleda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 3:09 pm

For the second consecutive year, a wide survey found people in Latin America are the least likely to say they live in countries where women are treated with respect and dignity, ranking below the Middle East and North Africa.

The Gallup survey found a wide range of opinions within Latin America: while 63 percent of respondents in Ecuador said women get respect, only 20 percent said the same in Peru and Colombia.

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Shots - Health News
12:05 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Can Changing How You Sound Help You Find Your Voice?

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 12:05 pm

Just having a feminine voice means you're probably not as capable at your job.

At least, studies suggest, that's what many people in the United States think. There's a gender bias in how Americans perceive feminine voices: as insecure, less competent and less trustworthy.

This can be a problem — especially for women jockeying for power in male-dominated fields, like law.

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NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Identifying The Worst Colleges In America

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 1:22 pm

For years,Washington Monthly has been rating and ranking the nation's colleges.

But for its 2014 edition, the magazine has done something new. It has put out a list of what it says are the nation's worst colleges. That is, schools with high tuition, low graduation rates and high student debt rates.

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All Tech Considered
11:34 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Snapchat And Dropbox Breaches Are Really Third-Party-App Breaches

Snapchat's logo.
Carl Raether Flickr

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 3:33 pm

What can get lost in a flurry of news about Dropbox and Snapchat getting hacked is that the companies themselves deny they were hacked at all.

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Author Interviews
11:31 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Journalist Talks Confidential Sources, Getting Subpoenaed And His New Book

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Music Reviews
11:31 am
Tue October 14, 2014

An Unofficial Memorial For Jazz Greats Jim Hall And Charlie Haden

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Secret U.S. Space Plane To Land After 22 Months In Orbit

This photo released by Vandenberg Air Force Base on Monday shows the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, the Air Force's unmanned, reusable space plane, after it landed at Vandenberg from a previous orbital mission.
Paul Pinner AP

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:59 pm

This much we know: It's not a bird and it's not exactly a plane.

Beyond that, the U.S. Air Force holds all the answers. The mission of the unmanned X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, which is scheduled to touch down at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Tuesday after 22 months in orbit, has been described only vaguely as "to gather more test data."

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The Salt
10:18 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Bike Like A Pro Athlete, Eat Like A Pig

This serving of Texas barbecue brisket, sausage and beans was a mere snack on our epic movable feast.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:59 am

Last month, a friend and I rode bicycles 738 miles up the spine of Texas from the Rio Grande to the Red River, dodging oilfield trucks and yipping Chihuahua dogs.

All that pedaling had us burning about 5,000 to 5,500 calories every day. And so the 10-day journey — eight days of it riding into a headwind — became a movable feast.

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Shots - Health News
8:28 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Health Premiums And Costs Set To Rise For Workers Covered At Work

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 9:20 am

Fall is enrollment season for many people who get insurance through their workplace. Premium increases for 2015 plans are expected to be modest on average, but the shift toward higher out-of-pocket costs overall for consumers will continue as employers try to keep a lid on their costs and incorporate health law changes.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Kim Jong Un Makes First Public Appearance In More Than A Month

A photo released Monday by the Rodong Sinmun, newspaper of the ruling Workers' Party, shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un walking with a cane as he visits a residential area in Pyongyang.
Rodong Sinmun EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 8:31 am

After 40 days of seclusion, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has made a public appearance, an outing that could help quell rumors about his health and status. Kim visited a new housing complex, according to state media that released photos of the event — but without attaching a specific date to it.

North Korea has confirmed only that Kim has been in "discomfort." The newly released photos show Kim using a cane, possibly confirming theories that he underwent ankle surgery. More than a month ago, he was seen limping as he walked.

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New Boom
7:31 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Getting Some 'Me' Time: Why Millennials Are So Individualistic

Millennials are often painted as the entitled, selfie-snapping generation. But many researchers say that "me" time will help young people make better decisions in the long run.
© Eugenio Marongiu iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 8:35 am

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

They are a class of self-centered, self-absorbed, selfie-snapping 20-somethings. This is how many critics have come to define the millennial generation.

But hold on, isn't this what was said about every generation when it was young? Minus the selfies of course.

Some scholars argue that millennials aren't entitled — they just have more time to be themselves.

Markers Of Adulthood

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Tue October 14, 2014

British Lawmakers Vote To Recognize Palestinian State

A man wears a Palestinian and Union flag outside the Houses of Parliament in London on Monday to show his support for the symbolic vote.
Luke MacGregor Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 10:26 am

Britain's Parliament has voted to support the recognition of a Palestinian state in a symbolic vote that follows a similar move by Sweden.

The BBC says the 274-to-12 vote in the House of Commons is being described by the chamber " 'as a contribution to securing a negotiated two-state solution' — although less than half of MPs took part in the vote."

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Goats and Soda
7:01 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Forget Facebook, Abandon Instagram, Move To A Village

Neighbors and relatives share food, drink and conversation in Northern Uganda.
Said&Seen The Chantal Paydar Foundation

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 12:14 pm

In the parts of the world that we cover in our blog, many people live in villages.

Villages have their problems, to be sure. There may not be a doctor or clinic nearby. Girls may not be able to go to school. Clean water might be a long walk away.

But a new book points out that village life has its advantages.

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The Two-Way
6:10 am
Tue October 14, 2014

What They're Saying: Vatican's New Tolerance On Gays And The Divorced

Pope Francis attends a morning session of a two-week synod on family issues at the Vatican, on Monday.
Massimiliano Migliorato/CP PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 9:00 am

Updated at 11:00 a.m. ET

As we reported earlier, a synod of Catholic bishops meeting at the Vatican has released an interim document that signals the likelihood of a dramatic overhaul in the church's stance on gays and lesbians, as well as its view on divorced members.

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Around the Nation
5:32 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Astros' Turnaround Costs Furniture Mogul

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:00 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
5:08 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Key To Securing Online Accounts May Be Just A Squiggle Away

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:25 am

We've come a long way in the information age. We know how to put data on the cloud. We hold mobile devices that can carry as much music as a record store. We've figured out how to send photos to friends with lightning speed — and make them self-destruct after 10 seconds. And yet we haven't quite figured out passwords.

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Animals
5:07 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Missing Parrot Returns But Doesn't Speak English Anymore

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:00 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:07 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Police Arrest Dozens In Ferguson, Mo., Protests

An unidentified man is taken into custody Monday after performing an act of civil disobedience at the Ferguson, Mo., police station. About 50 were arrested during protests over the police shooting of Michael Brown in August.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 6:42 am

Amid rain showers and a tornado watch, police in Ferguson, Mo., made dozens of arrests Monday afternoon and into the evening of people who had gathered to protest the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, the black 18-year-old who was killed by a white police officer in August.

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Asia
3:15 am
Tue October 14, 2014

China's Nomads Have A Foot In Two Very Different Worlds

Zhaxi Cairang (right), a 59-year-old Tibetan nomad, moved to a city in western China 15 years ago as part of a government effort to settle nomads. But Zhaxi says he plans to return to herding yaks next year. His son Cicheng Randing was raised in the city, but his father wants to expose him to traditional nomadic life as well.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 8:46 am

Zhaxi Cairang is trying to give his son a choice of two worlds to live in: the traditional, pastoral world of Tibetan nomads, which he has inhabited for most of his 59 years, or the modern urban lifestyle that most Tibetans experience in today's China.

Zhaxi made the transition himself about 15 years ago, when he left the grasslands and moved into the city of Yushu in western China's Qinghai province. Yushu sits on the eastern end of the Tibetan plateau. More than 95 percent of its residents are ethnic Tibetans.

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