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A federal judge has ruled to temporarily block an Obama administration order to detain mothers and children seeking asylum in the U.S., what is known as the "no-release" policy.

The Wall Street Journal says: "The lawsuit challenged the new practice by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a unit of the Department of Homeland Security, of detaining women and children who had shown a credible fear of persecution."

Late last month, during a meeting of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen, a shoving match broke out among members of the public — some of them off-duty police officers.

The cause of the tension was a proposal to create a new civilian oversight authority for the police. Advocates of police reform like civilian oversight, but police officers say the boards are often politicized and unfair to them.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

A fire in one of the world's tallest residential skyscrapers in Dubai forced the evacuation of hundreds of people before it was safely extinguished with no deaths.

Local media reports that the blaze broke out in the 86-story Torch Tower at about 2:30 a.m. local time in the United Arab Emirates.

Eight months after a notorious group of fighters in Iraq and Syria became regular characters in the news, NPR still begins most of its reports with words such as these:

-- "Self-declared Islamic State."

-- "Self-proclaimed Islamic State."

-- "The group that calls itself the Islamic State."

Newly confirmed Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, in a surprise visit to Afghanistan today, gave the strongest indication to date that the White House is considering slowing down its troop withdrawal timetable to accommodate security concerns.

Carter said Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and President Obama would get a chance to discuss a possible "rethinking" of plans for the exit of the remaining 10,000 U.S. forces when Ghani visits Washington next month.

A lot of people saw their hopes and dreams fulfilled this week — for just a few hours.

Carnegie Mellon University emailed about 800 people who had applied to graduate school to say, 'Congratulations, you're in.' They were — to quote the message of acceptance — "one of the select few" to be accepted into Carnegie Mellon's prestigious Master of Science in Computer Science program.

A young woman in India who was accepted wrote on Facebook that she quit her job, bolstered by this act of faith in her future. Her boyfriend proposed marriage.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Is Apple about to change our lives again?

The company's stock has been on the rise this week, partly because of a rumor that Apple wants launch a line of cars, and do it by 2020.

Wall Street and Silicon Valley are excited, but people in the car business? Not so much.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The locksmith. The journalist. The computer technician. The waitress. The carpenter.

They are a rotating cast of characters connected to prosecutor Alberto Nisman and the deepening mystery surrounding his death last month. Famous for a moment, they have fed Argentina's obsession with conspiracy.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After Superstorm Sandy in 2012, Kathy Hanlon's life crumbled. Her Long Beach, N.Y., home had no electricity, her family was traumatized and one of her sons was getting sick. On top of that, there was the bureaucratic maze of flood insurance.

"I cried many times because I was so angry when I got off the phone with the insurance company," Hanlon says. "It was demeaning. We had to send them things repeatedly. We had to wait for phone calls. We had to wait for people to come visit the house."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Type "drunk," "hammered," or "trashed" into YouTube's search bar and some pretty unsavory videos are likely to turn up.

And that can't be good for teenagers and young adults, researchers say. User-generated YouTube videos portraying dangerous drinking get hundreds of millions of views online, according a study published Friday in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo took office a little more than 100 days ago, buoyed by sky-high expectations for political change. He's seen as very different from the strongmen and power brokers who have dominated the country for decades.

And he's certainly unconventional. He's an avid fan of heavy metal groups like Metallica and Megadeth. He's been photographed wearing black Napalm Death T-shirts and flashing the "devil's horns" hand sign.

Getting ready for the Lunar New Year once meant buying a new set of clothes for many families of Korean ancestry.

For centuries, the costume known as hanbok – a two-piece outfit traditionally made of embroidered cotton or silk worn by men and women – has played a central role in the new year's wardrobe.

Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse and Snow White all peer from behind as an elderly Tibetan woman sits in front of the camera. "Do you have any other background?" asks the man who led her to her seat.

"Of course, bring the catalogue," says the weary photographer. He's already taken dozens of portraits that day.

West Coast ports and the labor unions that service them reached a tentative agreement Friday night, NPR's Kirk Siegler reports, potentially ending a nine-month standoff that had snarled the movement of cargo.

Most of the big aspects of a deal — wages, benefits, even maintenance contracts — have been settled for weeks, Kirk says, but some sticking points remained.

"This week the high drama seemed to be over something somewhat minor ... who has the power to hire and fire an arbitration during separate, smaller disputes," he says.

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And we pick up there with our Friday commentators, E. J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution. Hey there, E. J.

E.J. DIONNE, BYLINE: Good to be with you.

For more than 500 million years, sea creatures have been getting bigger — much bigger as it turns out, according to a study by scientists who say that the evolutionary trend toward larger body size fits with a 19th-century principle known as Cope's rule.

The rule, first posited in the late 1800s by Edward Drinker Cope, "states that evolution tends to increase body size over geologic time in a lineage of populations."

Three British teenagers are believed to be on their way to Syria, lured by militants from the self-declared Islamic State.

Scotland Yard has issued an urgent appeal for any clues that may lead to the whereabouts of the school girls, because police say if they make it to Syria, they may never be able to return.

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi is noted for making bold statements — both in policy and fashion. When Modi sported a suit with pinstripes that spelled out his name in tiny gold lettering, his critics called it the height of vanity.

But the controversial suit raised more than eyebrows: It sold at auction today for nearly $695,000.

The "selfie" suit was debuted when Modi wore it to a bilateral meeting with President Obama during his visit to India last month.

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Time now for your comments. But first, an update. Wednesday we brought you a preview of a wine tasting competition between Cambridge and Oxford Universities.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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On January 1, 20 states raise their minimum wage and several states have additional increases planned in the coming months. Yesterday, we learned that Walmart will raise its base pay to $9 an hour this April.

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