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NPR Story
3:06 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Baltimore Ravens Cut Ray Rice After New Video Surfaces

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 6:11 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:06 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Senate Moves Forward In Bid To Limit Campaign Funds

People stand with signs on Capitol Hill as Senate and House Democrats called for an amendment to the Constitution aimed at curbing special interests' financial clout in elections.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 6:11 am

The Senate voted overwhelmingly Monday to debate a proposed constitutional amendment that would let Congress and the states put caps on political spending. But that's probably the high-water mark for the amendment.

When Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) called the vote tally, it looked like a big win for advocates of the constitutional amendment: 79 ayes, 18 nays. That's a dozen votes more than the 67-vote majority needed to actually move the amendment out of the Senate and over to the House.

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NPR Story
3:06 am
Tue September 9, 2014

In Some Jobs, Past Achievements May Work Against Female Workers

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 7:14 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Parallels
1:43 am
Tue September 9, 2014

How The Islamic State Smuggles Oil To Fund Its Campaign

Smoke rises from the Beiji oil refinery during clashes between the Islamic State and Iraqi government forces in Beiji, northern Iraq, on July 30. The militants tried to take the refinery this summer, but government forces have held on.
STR EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 10:54 am

In less than three years, the Islamic State has had a remarkable rise from startup militants to a cash-rich and capable extremist organization. The swift expansion is fueled, in part, by a massive oil smuggling operation in eastern Syria that has now expanded to Iraq, according to regional analysts and oil industry specialists.

The Islamic State, also known as ISIS, earns millions of dollars from these ongoing smuggling efforts.

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All Tech Considered
1:34 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Size Matters: Why Apple Is Expected To Unveil A Bigger iPhone

The Samsung Galaxy Mega (from left), Samsung Galaxy S4 and Apple iPhone 5 are shown. Apple is expected to announce larger models of its smartphone on Tuesday.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 9:04 am

You may have noticed that after years of getting smaller, smartphones are getting bigger. It's a trend that's mostly been led by Samsung. Apple's late CEO, Steve Jobs, famously knocked the idea that people wanted larger phones. But on Tuesday, Apple is expected to announce bigger iPhones and is relenting to the reality that we're talking less on our phones and using them more like a mini computer.

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Environment
1:33 am
Tue September 9, 2014

More Than Half Of U.S. Bird Species Threatened By Climate Change

A Baltimore oriole perches near apple blossoms in Mendota Heights, Minn.
Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 6:33 am

People in Maryland love their Baltimore orioles — so much so that their Major League Baseball team bears the name of the migrating bird. Yet, by 2080, there may not be any orioles left in Maryland. They migrate each year and, according to a new report, could soon be forced to nest well north of the Mid-Atlantic state.

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Governing
1:31 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Following Ferguson, Senate Weighs Use Of Military-Grade Equipment

Police fire tear gas from an armored personnel carrier on Aug. 18 in Ferguson, Mo. The U.S. Senate is holding a hearing on the use of military-grade equipment by local police departments.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 2:47 pm

Last month, scenes from Ferguson, Mo., showed police in military-style armored vehicles pointing assault rifles at protesters.

Now, the first congressional hearing in response to those events is being held. It's looking specifically at Washington, D.C.'s hand in militarizing local law enforcement, through federal programs that equipped thousands of police and sheriff's departments with gear made for warfare.

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Shots - Health News
1:29 am
Tue September 9, 2014

U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 8:13 am

Ten years ago, Robert Waterland got an associate professorship at Baylor College of Medicine and set off to study one of the nation's most pressing health problems: obesity. In particular, he's been trying to figure out the biology behind why children born to obese women are more likely to develop the condition themselves.

Waterland got sustaining funding from the National Institutes of Health and used it to get the project going.

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The Two-Way
5:22 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Marin Cilic Wins U.S. Open, Sealing An Improbable Journey

Marin Cilic of Croatia reacts after a shot against Kei Nishikori of Japan during the championship match of the 2014 U.S. Open tennis tournament. Cilic won in three sets.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 6:09 pm

Marin Cilic won the U.S. Open on Monday, sealing an improbable journey and ending that of Kei Nishikori, who had become the highest-ranked Japanese player in history.

Cilic, as we reported, got to this point by dispatching Roger Federer in three sets on Saturday.

Today, he beat Nishikori, who had defeated the No. 1-ranked Novak Djokovic, in three sets, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3. After the win, Cilic ran up the stands to hug his family.

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The Two-Way
4:47 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Floods Hit Phoenix In Area's Wettest Day Ever Recorded

Scottsdale, Ariz., also experienced flooding near 78th and Roosevelt streets. This area is designed as a runoff wash.
Nick Blumberg KJZZ

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 6:24 am

Roads both big and small have been overtaken with rainwater in the Phoenix area today, after strong storms hit early this morning. At least one death has been reported in the region, and a state of emergency has been declared.

Weather experts say that the more than 3 inches of rain already recorded in the Phoenix region Monday breaks a record that was set more than 70 years ago.

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Book Reviews
4:39 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

James Ellroy's 'Perfidia' Is A Brutal, Beautiful Police Procedural

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 5:32 pm

There are a lot of reasons not to read James Ellroy's newest novel, Perfidia — the opening shot in his proposed second L.A. Quartet. It's a long and sprawling book with about a million pages and 10,000 characters, so if that kind of thing scares you, go back to your Hunger Games and leave the grown-ups alone.

It's a brutal book. More than one person crawls home with a handful of his own teeth. A quick gunshot to the head? That's a merciful way to go in Ellroy's Los Angeles, and not many characters get that kindness.

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Goats and Soda
4:03 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Time To Send A Message To Pregnant Women Who Use Tobacco

Cigarette packages deliver a public health message in Indonesia.
Tatan Syuflana AP

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Men In America
3:53 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Making Fatherhood An Insider's Game: Becoming A Dad, Again, At 49

Dale Conour with his son Quinn, 2. Conour's two children from a previous marriage were already young men when Quinn was born.
Rosanne Sax Courtesy of Dale Conour

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 7:12 am

Meet Dale Conour, a strapping, athletic man of 52. At midday, he's at home eating lunch with his son, Quinn, who is 2 1/2. Half of the living room of their San Francisco apartment is clearly Quinn's territory, filled with building blocks, a tepee and a train set.

Conour, a brand strategist and former magazine editor, is currently between jobs — which frees him up for afternoons like this with Quinn.

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The Salt
3:35 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Could Great Lakes Fisheries Be Revived Through Fish Farms?

Opponents of Michigan fish farms say there is no room for them in the lakes because of sport fishing and other recreational activities.
sfgamchick/Flickr

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 5:20 pm

Even though Michigan is surrounded by more than 20 percent of the world's freshwater, fish farming is largely unheard of there.

But this summer, the aquaculture industry took a step forward. And that has touched off a debate over the appropriateness of fish farming on the Great Lakes.

There's only one company now in Michigan that raises fish for restaurants and grocery stores in large volumes. It's a family business, run by Dan Vogler, on a few acres near Harrietta, Mich., population 143.

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The Two-Way
3:28 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Iraqi Parliament Approves New Government Led By Abadi

After months of uncertainty and political wrangling, Iraq has a new government, led by Shiite Haider al-Abadi. After hours in session Monday, the country's parliament gave its approval to Abadi and several cabinet ministers.

Abadi was nominated to lead Iraq last month, as support for Nouri al-Maliki unraveled in the face of factional strife and the advances of extremists the Islamic State. One month ago, as Maliki attempted to hold on to power, Abadi's nomination sparked demonstrations by Maliki's supporters. Today, Maliki was given a vice president post.

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Politics
3:17 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Pryor Sticks To The Middle In Close Arkansas Senate Race

Arkansas Democrat Mark Pryor is fighting for his seat in a state that's grown more Republican. He's campaigning hard at events like this University of Arkansas Razorbacks game.
Ailsa Chang NPR

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 5:04 pm

Arkansas Democrat Mark Pryor is running one of the closest Senate races in the country. The fight, which could determine which party will control the Senate next year, may be on its way to becoming the most expensive race in the state's history.

Since President Obama won in 2008, Arkansas has grown more Republican, but Pryor is still hoping to win a third term on his reputation as a down-the-middle guy.

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Shots - Health News
2:24 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

New Option For Getting Rid Of Old Drugs: The Pharmacy

Soon there will be disposal choices beyond the take-back drives for old medicines.
DEA

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 6:32 am

If you have old or unused narcotic painkillers in the medicine cabinet, your main choices for getting rid of them have been to toss them in the trash, flush them down the toilet or drop them off at the police station.

But soon it will be possible to take them to the local drugstore or even mail them back.

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Shots - Health News
2:24 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Researcher Urges Wider Genetic Screening For Breast Cancer

Lisa Schlager of Chevy Chase, Md., demonstrates outside of the Supreme Court as arguments were made in a case seeking to determine whether the BRCA breast cancer genes can be patented. The court ruled in 2013 that individual genes can't be patented.
Tom Williams CQ Roll Call/Getty

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 10:43 am

A prominent scientist has started a big new debate about breast cancer. Geneticist Mary-Claire King of the University of Washington, who identified the first breast cancer gene, is recommending that all women get tested for genetic mutations that can cause breast cancer.

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Shots - Health News
2:21 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

CDC Warns Of Fast-Spreading Enterovirus Afflicting Children

13-year-old Will Cornejo of Lone Tree, Colo., recovers at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in Denver from what doctors suspect is enterovirus 68. His parents found him unconscious on the couch and called 911. He was flown to Denver for treatment.
Cyrus McCrimmon Denver Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 11:46 am

A rarely seen virus is sending children to the hospital with severe respiratory infections, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning doctors and parents to be on the alert.

"Hospitalizations are higher than would be expected at this time of year," Dr. Anne Schuchat, head of infectious diseases for the CDC, said Monday at a press briefing on enterovirus 68. "The situation is evolving quickly."

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Remembrances
2:16 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Chick-Fil-A Founder Credited His Success To Christian Principles

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 9:06 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Movies
2:16 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Oscar Buzz Builds At Toronto Film Fest

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 4:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:37 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

A Community For Holocaust Survivors

Edith Stern, pictured in her apartment in Chicago's SelfHelp Home. She is a 93 year old Holocaust survivor. (Bill Healey/Here & Now)

The SelfHelp Home in Chicago was established in 1938 by European Jewish immigrants for those who escaped Nazi Germany.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson spoke to 93-year-old Edith Stern, who survived Auschwitz.

She says she started working at the SelfHelp Home in her 40s because she wanted to help elderly Holocaust Survivors.

“I could never do anything for my own parents — they were killed,” Stern said. “Those people who live in the retirement home could have been my parents.”

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NPR Story
1:37 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Ty Burr's Take On The Toronto International Film Festival

Pictured here is Jake Gyllenhaal in a scene from the film, "Nightcrawler" which was screened at the Toronto International Film Festival (Open Road Films via AP)

The Toronto International Film Festival started on September 4th runs through this Sunday. It’s a place where many films start generating Oscar buzz.

Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss some of his early favorites including “The Theory of Everything,” “Nightcrawler,” A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence,” and “The Last Five Years.”

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NPR Story
1:37 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

U.S. Open Men's Final Is Battle of Unknowns

Marin Cilic of Croatia (R) shakes hands with Roger Federer of Switzerland (L) after defeating Federer during the US Open men's seminfinal. Cilic will face Kei Nishikori of Japan today. (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

The men’s US Open final will pit two relative unknowns against each other: 14th seeded Marin Cilic and 10th seeded Kei Nishikori.

It’s the first time in nearly a decade that any Grand Slam final has not included Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic or Rafael Nadal, who have dominated men’s tennis.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Tom Perrotta, sports correspondent for The Wall Street Journal about the the players and what tennis fans can expect in today’s match.

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The Two-Way
1:36 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Hawks Seek Buyer After NBA Team's Owner Reveals Racially Charged Email

Bruce Levenson, seen at an Atlanta Hawks game on Dec. 4, 2013, in Atlanta, announced Sunday that he was selling his stake in the team because of a racially charged email he sent in 2012.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 1:44 pm

The co-owner and CEO of the Atlanta Hawks says multiple people have reached out to him to buy the NBA franchise following the announcement by controlling owner Bruce Levenson that he would sell his stake in the team because of a racially charged email he sent two years ago.

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The Salt
12:54 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Healthy Food? Huddle House Won't Be Serving That Anytime Soon

One of Huddle House's signature dishes is the Philly Cheese Steak Tots: steak covered with cheddar cheese sauce and shredded cheese, on an open-faced omelet with Tater Tots.
Huddle House

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 3:41 pm

From IHOP to Olive Garden, most of the nation's biggest restaurant chains have come around to the fact that not every customer who walks through the door is craving country-fried steak with eggs and gravy or fried lasagna with alfredo sauce.

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Author Interviews
12:07 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

How 'Gatsby' Went From A Moldering Flop To A Great American Novel

A first edition of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby was displayed at the London International Antiquarian Book Fair in 2013. Book critic Maureen Corrigan — who calls the cover "striking" — says she likes to think that if it landed on her porch today among the more than 200 books she receives a week, she would read it.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 12:53 pm

When book critic Maureen Corrigan first read F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby in high school, she was unimpressed.

"Not a lot happens in Gatsby," Corrigan tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It's not a plot-driven novel and I also thought, 'Eh, it's another novel about rich people.' And I grew up in a blue-collar community."

She also couldn't relate, she says, because it doesn't feature any likeable female characters.

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Parallels
12:01 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

After A Tumultuous Summer, Ukrainian Kids Return To School

Many students at Kiev's Lyceum for the Humanities have relatives in Russia or parts of eastern Ukraine controlled by separatists. The conflict has divided families and caused many problems, they say, but it has also strengthened their sense of Ukraine's identity.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 4:53 pm

Music resounds through the hallways to signal the end of class at Kiev's Lyceum for the Humanities, one of the Ukrainian capital's top public high schools.

Lively students dressed in dark blue school uniforms pour into the stairwells as they make their way to the next class. Once they're seated at their desks, their teacher explains that today a foreign journalist has come to meet them.

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Parallels
11:54 am
Mon September 8, 2014

From A Chinese Apartment To Wall Street Darling: The Rise Of Alibaba

Jack Ma speaks in Hangzhou, China, on May 10, 2013. Ma shot to fame as the founder of Alibaba, the pioneering Chinese e-commerce site that's poised to be one of the biggest tech IPOs ever when it goes public in New York.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 6:23 pm

Like most great origin stories, the tale behind China's e-commerce giant, Alibaba, begins simply. In the winter of 1999, Jack Ma, a former English teacher, gathered friends in an apartment in the eastern city of Hangzhou.

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Movie Reviews
11:47 am
Mon September 8, 2014

In A Brilliantly Disorienting Film, A Teenager Is 'Starred Up' To An Adult Prison

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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