Annie Osburn

Cultural Affairs Volunteer - HumaNature and Spoken Words

Annie is an MFA candidate in fiction at the University of Wyoming. She is originally from Michigan, but comes to Laramie by way of California, Virginia, Montana and Alaska. She earned degrees in Political Science and Law from Stanford University, but has now worked as a wilderness guide for longer than she practiced law. Her writing interests center on the influence of wilderness and isolation on individuals. Her non-writing interests include baking, rock and ice climbing, and playing music with friends and strangers.

Listen to the full show here. 

2018 Legislative Session Update: Chaos, Critical Infrastructure, And Education Funding

The Wyoming Legislative session is coming to an end and Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck joined Morning Edition host Caroline Ballard to discuss the lawmakers' progress.

Q. Quallen rock climbing
Q. Quallen

On a Sunday evening, Q. Quallen worked off some stress at the University of Wyoming rock climbing gym. The senior, double majoring in wildlife and natural resources, has had a rough past year.

“When I’m climbing, it’s like a puzzle that I have to solve,” said Quallen. “It’s the only thing that actually distracts me enough right now.”

Quallen focused on moving up the vertical wall one tiny, fake rock at a time; just his fingertips and toes making contact.

Photo by Wally Gobetz via Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Cheyenne Capital Chorale is accustomed to performing at 6,000 feet; they've been doing it for sixty years. But this winter, they'll have the benefit of a little more oxygen. On January 15, nine members of the Chorale will be performing the works of Sir Karl Jenkins at Carnegie Hall in New York City. 

Barb Boyer is a board member of the Chorale and one of the representatives headed to New York. She told Wyoming Public Radio's Annie Osburn that this performance will be a bit different for the Chorale.   

Creative Commons Zero - CC0 via maxpixel

It's almost Halloween. Plastic tombstones and dancing skeletons are everywhere you look. But how does Wyoming handle actual death? Wyoming Public Radio's Annie Osburn spoke with someone whose job it was to be in presence of the dead.