The Associated Press

Cursed by a Billy Goat, bedeviled by Bartman and crushed by decades of disappointment, the Chicago Cubs are at long last headed back to the World Series.

Kyle Hendricks outpitched Clayton Kershaw, Anthony Rizzo and Willson Contreras homered early and the Cubs won their first pennant since 1945, beating the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-0 Saturday night in Game 6 of the NL Championship Series.

The drought ended when closer Aroldis Chapman got Yasiel Puig to ground into a double play, setting off a wild celebration at Wrigley Field.

Hurricane Matthew is roaring across the Caribbean Sea as a monster Category 5 storm on a course that puts Jamaica, as well as parts of Haiti and Cuba, in the path of its potentially devastating winds and rain.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center called it the strongest Atlantic hurricane since Felix in 2007, and said Matthew will be approaching Jamaica late Sunday night. It is expected to reach the eastern part of the island on Monday.

12:25 a.m.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett says the north side is calming after violence in the wake of a police shooting that left one man dead.

The violence erupted a few hours after an officer shot and killed a 23-year-old man. Police said the man was fleeing a traffic stop and was armed with a gun. It wasn't immediately clear if he pointed it at or fired it at the officer.

Alex Rodriguez returned to the infield, hugged a reception line of teammates and was handed the final ball from his final game with the New York Yankees. He walked to the area behind third base, leaned down and grabbed a handful of dirt.

Baseball's most notorious star of the last two decades then headed back to the dugout after a Yankee Stadium finale Friday night that included a pregame ceremony punctuated by thunder cracks and cut short by a downpour, a first-inning RBI double and a surprising ninth-inning return to third base.

A failed asylum-seeker from Syria blew himself up and wounded 12 people after being turned away from an open-air music festival in southern Germany in what officials said Monday may have been a suicide bombing. It was the fourth attack to shake Germany in a week — three of them carried out by recent immigrants.

The 27-year-old blew himself up at a bar shortly after 10 p.m. Sunday, having been turned away from an open-air music festival in the southern town of Ansbach because he didn't have a ticket.

A burned body was found Saturday at the scene of a brushfire north of Los Angeles that has scorched 31 square miles and prompted the evacuation of 1,500 homes, authorities said.

The body was discovered outside a home on Iron Canyon Road in Santa Clarita, and detectives are trying to determine whether the person was killed by the blaze or another cause, Los Angeles County sheriff's Lt. Rob Hahnlein said. The home also may have burned, he said.

Creator closed with a rush and caught Destin at the wire to win the $1.5 million Belmont Stakes on Saturday, with Preakness winner Exaggerator finishing well back in the field.

The 3-year-old gray colt trained by Steve Asmussen came flying down the stretch as Destin tried to hang on to the lead. But it was Creator, who finished 13th in the Derby and skipped the Preakness, who won by a nose. It was the fourth time the Belmont was decided by a nose — the closest possible margin of victory.

A massive fire broke out during a fireworks display in a Hindu temple in south India early Sunday, killing more than 100 people and injuring at least 200 others, officials said.

The fire started when a spark from the unauthorized fireworks show ignited a separate batch of fireworks that were being stored at the Puttingal temple complex in Paravoor village, a few hours north of Kerala's state capital of Thiruvananthapuram, said Chief Minister Oommen Chandy, the state's top elected official.

North Carolina will look for its sixth NCAA championship when the Tar Heels meet the Villanova Wildcats, trying for their second, on Monday night.

The Tar Heels (33-6) last won it all in 2009 and Villanova's only title came in 1985.

Both teams advanced to the championship game with lopsided wins, but Villanova's was far more of a blowout than North Carolina's.

Ford workers narrowly approved a new four-year contract, wrapping up five months of negotiations between the United Auto Workers union and Detroit automakers.

The UAW said late Friday that Ford's contract passed with a 51.4-percent vote. The agreement covers 53,000 U.S. hourly workers at 22 plants.

President Barack Obama's plan to protect from deportation an estimated 5 million people living in the United States illegally suffered another setback Monday in a ruling from a New Orleans-based federal appeals court.

In a 2-1 decision, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a Texas-based federal judge's injunction blocking the administration's immigration initiative.

Republicans had criticized the plan as an illegal executive overreach when Obama announced it last November. Twenty-six states challenged the plan in court.

A top leader of Yemen's al-Qaida branch has claimed responsibility for last week's attack on a Paris newspaper, when two masked gunmen killed 12 people, including much of the weekly's editorial staff and two police officers.

Nasr al-Ansi, a top commander of Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP as the branch is known, appeared in an 11-minute Internet video posted Wednesday, saying that the massacre at Charlie Hebdo was in "vengeance for the prophet." The paper had published cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, which is considered an insult in Islam.

Rebecca Huntington

Workers are building a temporary path for a drill rig to access a slow-moving landslide threatening homes and businesses in a Wyoming resort town.

Jackson officials say the heavy rig will drill bore holes up to 200 feet deep along the upper crest as they look for ways to counter the slow collapse first noticed April 4.

The samples should tell them about the composition of the formation, the depth of the slide, the water levels and the location of the slide's scarp.

Jackson Fire Chief Willy Watsabaugh gave a tour of the area over the weekend.

Officials in Jackson are exploring alternatives for access and possible emergency stabilization efforts for an unstable hillside that continues to shift.

The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality is testing private wells in Hoback this week to find if benzene detected in Hoback Market's well is found in others nearby.

Benzene in Hoback Market's tap water measured 60 times the maximum allowed when the department tested it in March, and the agency says it came from the market's well. They said they are still looking for the source of the latest contamination.

Benzene is a compound found in gasoline and other sources that can cause cancer.

Wyoming Secretary of State Max Maxfield says he will not run for a third term even though he won a lawsuit before the state supreme court last year that affirms his right to do so.

Maxfield offered no explanation in making that announcement today to about a dozen people in the state Capitol. He said only that in retirement he plans to focus on his wife, Gayla, who was standing next to him.

Maxfield says he was thinking about running as recently as last week.

Cindy Hill Superintendent

Wyoming Supreme Court Chief Justice Marilyn Kite acknowledges that the court's decision in the superintendent of public instruction case has created concern and challenges.

Kite says there's nothing to be done now but for lawmakers, the governor and the court to embrace those challenges and fulfill their respective constitutional obligations.

Kite addressed the issue at the start of her State of Judiciary speech before a joint legislative session Monday.

The Campbell County Commission has selected Troy Mader as the new representative for House District 52, replacing the late Rep. Sue Wallis.

Legislative leaders said he will be sworn in on Tuesday and begin serving in the Legislature immediately.

Wallis died in January at age 56.

Mader has served as a precinct representative for the Campbell County Republican Party.

He says his first priority for the current legislative session will be to make connections in the Legislature while learning the ropes.

Coal sales in western states are under increased scrutiny from lawmakers after revelations of problems including reserves of the fuel sold at prices below market value.

A letter from the U.S. Department of Interior Inspector General released Friday shows federal officials in Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico accepted below-market bids for coal or sold the fuel without full appraisals.

Inspectors said that violated federal rules including the 1920 Mineral Leasing Act, which requires coal sales to be competitive.

Cindy Hill Superintendent

A panel of Wyoming lawmakers is drafting a bill that could lead to a special legislative session to deal with fallout from the state Supreme Court decision in the superintendent of public instruction case.

The state Supreme Court ruled 3-2 last week that a law enacted last year that took away many of the superintendent's duties was unconstitutional. The court said the Legislature went too far.

A former Roman Catholic priest who's running for U.S. Senate in Wyoming calls for raising the minimum wage and creating jobs through infrastructure projects.

Democrat Charlie Hardy, of Cheyenne, formally kicked off his campaign Tuesday by speaking to a couple dozen supporters at his campaign office in Cheyenne. Hardy says he's running because many parents in Wyoming worry about not having enough money to provide for their children.

Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead says he believes the state is in good shape going into the legislative budget session that starts next week.

Mead's State of the State address will kick off the legislative session that starts Monday in Cheyenne. Lawmakers have set aside four weeks to craft a budget for the two-year funding period that starts July 1.

Mead told The Associated Press today that he's generally satisfied with the Legislature's Joint Appropriations Committee's recommendations on his budget proposals.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released its final version of a plan to reduce atmospheric haze by cutting emissions from coal-fired power plants in Wyoming.

EPA officials say the plan will improve visibility across wide-open spaces while protecting natural resources and local economies which depend on recreation.

They say the 714-page document adopts most of a separate plan proposed by Wyoming environmental regulators.

Members of the Joint Labor, Health and Social Services Interim Committee voted Friday to advance two Medicaid expansion bills to the full Legislature for consideration in the budget session that starts next month.

On Thursday, several witnesses told committee members that said they can't afford health insurance on the open market.

Smoking ban advocates in Casper are suing to demand a recount of a petition challenging the city's new weakened regulations.

The co-leader of Keep Casper Smoke Free, Kim Holloway, filed the lawsuit Wednesday in Natrona County.

The city says the group failed to collect enough signatures on their petition calling for a referendum on the ban. But Holloway says the signatures of up to 95 people were wrongly thrown out.

A new wildfire has started in Yellowstone National Park but officials report no issues with any of the fires burning in the park.

Storms on Thursday brought rain to the Alum (AL'-um) Fire burning about 5 miles northwest of Fishing Bridge Junction. However, the storms also were accompanied by lightning that started at least one new fire about a mile away.

The National Park Service says more than 700 lightning strikes occurred in the park Thursday afternoon so additional fire starts are expected. Dry, warmer weather also is expected this weekend.

The Wyoming Health Department is reporting the state's first human case of West Nile virus this year.

The agency announced today that the case involves an adult female from Platte County.

Meantime, mosquitoes with West Nile virus have been detected throughout Fremont County this week.

Officials say they found mosquitoes with the virus in Riverton, Lander, rural Hudson and Arapahoe.

Fremont County Weed and Pest supervisor Lars Baker says West Nile is showing up earlier this year than in the past.

The Wyoming Supreme Court must decide whether Gov. Matt Mead was justified in withholding documents regarding grizzly bear management.

Grizzly activist Robert Aland has appealed a recent district court ruling that Mead was justified in withholding records.

Aland had asked Mead for records supporting his contention that the state's grizzly population is healthy enough that federal Endangered Species Act protections are no longer needed.

A wildfire is threatening some summer homes and campgrounds southwest of Lander.

The homes in Homestead Park and campers in Sinks Canyon were evacuated today as the Fairfield Fire spread in hot and windy conditions in grass and sagebrush. Forest Service spokeswoman Kristie Salzman said about 50 structures were threatened but it's not clear how many of them are homes and how many were occupied.

The area is a very popular spot in the summer, attracting rock climbers, mountain bikers and hikers.

Gov. Matt Mead has named Peter Michael to serve as interim Wyoming Attorney General.

Michael replaces former AG Greg Phillips, who was sworn in on Monday as a judge on the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals. Michael had served as deputy attorney general for Phillips.

Mead says Michael is an excellent attorney. Mead says he's confident Michael will lead the Attorney General's Office in a steady and capable manner until he can find a permanent replacement for Phillips.