Bob Beck

News Director

Phone: 307-766-6626
Email: btwo@uwyo.edu 

Bob Beck has been News Director of Wyoming Public Radio since 1988.  During his time as News Director WPR has won 94 national, regional and state news awards.  Bob has received the WEA School Bell Award for education reporting and was honored by the Governor’s Council on Impaired Driving for his reporting.  He was also the voice of an Emmy award winning documentary on memory.  He has covered the Wyoming Legislature longer than any broadcaster in the state and is a frequent political guest and host on Wyoming PBS.   

Bob also taught broadcast news at the University of Wyoming for 20 years and his 1998 television reporting class won a regional Emmy for reporting excellence.  He also was twice given a Top Prof award by the UW Mortar Board.   Bob is also active in community events and co-chaired the 2009 Albany County United Way Campaign with his wife Debra. 

Prior to coming to WPR, Bob worked as a News and Sportscaster at stations in Wyoming and Illinois.  He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Radio-Television from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and is a native of Wheaton, Illinois in suburban Chicago.  When he is not working he is running, mountain biking, doing CrossFit, walking his dog, or cheering on his beloved Packers, Bulls, Blackhawks, Cubs and Salukis.

Ways To Connect

The City of Laramie is urging the state to pay for the purchase of some 11,000 acres of land east of Laramie, so that the community can protect its water supply. 

The state has been asked to spend up to $20 million to purchase the land from former State Rep. Doug Samuelson, who many believe wants to use that money to in turn purchase a larger piece of land called the Y Cross Ranch in Laramie County. 

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While the Oil and Gas industry has had a number of workplace fatalities, that has not been the case in Wyoming’s Coal Industry. Tim McCreary is Safety Manager for the Thunder Basin Coal Company.  He tells Bob Beck workplace safety is a focus.

      The 17th annual International Pedigree Stage Stop Sled Dog race kicks of tonight in Jackson.  The event ends February 4th in Park City, Utah.  Buddy Streeper has won the event three times and is the two time defending champion.  He says the key is to start quickly and maintain that effort.

Wyoming Snowpack Improves

Jan 25, 2012

A water supply specialist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service says recent snowfall has improved the snowpack in the state.  Lee Hackleman says snowpack is 92 percent of normal statewide after sitting at 80 percent earlier this month.

 “The whole state went up this last week,” says Hackleman. “Some areas went up quite a bit more, like around the Wind rivers and up around the Park, they significantly went up there.  But even in the southern part of the state where we didn’t get as much,they still went up.”

A Mountain Lion and her two cubs have been active near Jackson’s Cache Creek Trailhead and officials are warning people to be cautious.  Mary Cernicek of the Bridger Teton National Forest says people should try to avoid an encounter. “It’s a good way to protect yourself by not having uncontrolled pets in the area and hang onto the little ones," Cernicek said.

A new Wyoming School Finance bill has been approved by the Legislature's Joint Education Committee, but it has its critics. 

The biggest concern is over a portion of the bill that is called the regional cost adjustment, which applies to salaries districts get and takes into consideration where a district is located. 

The committee has decided to shift to a new funding mechanism called the hedonic wage index, that will reduce what the state pays for salaries by about seven million dollars. 

The State Department of Education says school districts developing anti-bullying plans will do a lot to improve not only behavior, but education in the state.  Wyoming’s most recent youth risk behavior survey found that a quarter of high school students and better than 50 percent of middle school students in the state experienced bullying.  Superintendent of Schools Cindy Hill said bullying is unacceptable.  She said they have found that schools with no tolerance for bullying actually are higher performing schools and Hill says that is not surprising.

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Last spring, Laramie County school district number one, which serves all of Cheyenne, started working on its bullying plan.  It will train everyone from teachers to students. Recently, the district was reminded how important these efforts are as Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck reports.

mustknowhow.com

A group of citizens wants the Campbell County School District to allow a new long-term care facility to be built on land where an abandoned school, administration building and bus barn now stands.  Gillette resident Tom Johnson says the current nursing home facility needs to be updated.  The plan is to build a new long term care campus for residents that can better assist them at various stages of the aging process.

     For the last decade, Wyoming has ranked either first or second for workplace deaths and two groups are asking legislators to change things.  The AFL-CIO and the Spence Association for Employee Rights point to a recent report that said that Wyoming has had 622 work related deaths since 1992. Kim Floyd of the AFL-CIO says that is too many and it’s time for state leaders to change their approach and finally do something to improve the workplace culture.

http://effectsofbullying.net/how-to-stop-bullying-in-the-community/

For the last year and a half the Cheyenne school district says it has been developing new programs to address bullying in schools.  With the suicide death of 13 year old Alexander Frye, they say it shows how important this issue is. 

Frye’s relatives blame bullying at his school for his death and school Board member Glen Garcia says the district’s plan is intended to change the culture in schools by getting bystanders involved.

A state run health care pilot project continues to struggle to get participants, and Governor Matt Mead recently wonders about its future. 

The Healthy Frontiers project helps low income people who don’t qualify for government assistance programs to get health careand gets people access to a doctor which is paid for by a health care savings account.  Governor Mead says a number of people have signed up for the program, only to drop out.

Wyoming Tourism

Wyoming tourism officials are hoping that the snowfall in Jackson will attract tourists to the state between now and New Years. 

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