Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Updated at 4:55: Eighteen governors now oppose resettlement

In the wake of Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris, a growing number of Republican governors say they oppose allowing refugees from Syria to settle within their states.

Japan has once again slipped back into recession, casting new doubts upon whether "Abenomics," its much-touted economic-reform agenda, is succeeding.

The economy contracted by .8 percent in the third quarter of 2015, following a decline of .7 percent in the preceding quarter.

It was the fourth time in five years that the Japanese economy entered a recession, which is usually defined as two successive quarters of negative growth.

The government said consumption by the private sector rose by .5 percent during the quarter, in line with expectations.

Twenty years after Serbs massacred 8,000 Muslim men and boys in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica, the Serb government says it is donating $5.4 million to help revive the town's economy.

"We want Srebrenica to become a bridge of cooperation," said Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic, attending an investment conference in the town.

A federal grand jury in New York has indicted two nephews of Venezuela's powerful first lady for allegedly trying to smuggle cocaine into the United States.

Efrain Antonio Campo Flores, 29, and Franqui Francisco Flores de Freitas, 30, were charged in a one-count indictment filed in New York. They will appear before a judge on Thursday afternoon.

A judge in Utah has ordered a lesbian couple to give up the infant foster child they were caring for, reportedly telling them that the girl would be better off living with a straight couple, according to The Salt Lake Tribune.

Beckie Peirce, 34, and her wife, April Hoagland, 38, say they were taken aback on Tuesday when 7th District Court Juvenile Judge Scott Johansen ordered the girl removed from their care and placed in another home within seven days.

Seven employees of a Florida real estate firm were among those who died when their small plane crashed into an Ohio apartment building Tuesday, the firm said today.

The plane, a 10-passenger Hawker business jet, was approaching Akron Fulton International Airport when it slammed into a four-unit apartment building at about 3:00 p.m., killing nine people including the crew.

Volkswagen is offering its diesel vehicle owners $1,000 in incentives, in what it calls "a first step" toward regaining their loyalty following the scandal over faked emissions tests.

The package is available to about 480,000 customers in the U.S. and Puerto Rico with 2-liter, four-cylinder diesel vehicles. They can apply to receive a $500 prepaid Visa card, a $500 dealership card and three years of free roadside assistance, the company said.

New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says coal giant Peabody Energy made false and misleading statements to investors about the financial risks it faces because of climate change.

As part of an agreement with Schneiderman's office, the company has agreed to revise the disclosures it makes to investors about the risks in its quarterly report released today, and has promised to include the disclosures in future filings.

Thousands of Russian tourists were returning home from Egypt on Sunday, as suspicions mount that a bomb may have caused the crash of a St. Petersburg-bound charter jet over the Sinai on Oct. 31.

"Today is the busiest day in this sense," Russian Deputy Prime Minister Arkady Dvorkovich said Sunday.

Russia announced Friday it was suspending flights to Egypt until it determined the cause of the crash, which killed 224 people.

The debate over the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the free-trade pact between the United States and 11 other countries, is about to heat up.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen continues to leave the door open for an interest rate hike in December, though she says that once rates start to rise, it will be "very gradual."

Testifying before the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday, Yellen said the economy is "performing well," with solid growth in domestic spending.

Video-game publisher Activision Blizzard Inc. is taking a big step into the mobile world, acquiring King Digital Entertainment, the maker of Candy Crush games, for $5.9 billion.

The deal will create the second biggest game company in the world, after Tencent, says the research firm Newzoo. It will have some 500 million active monthly users around the world.

U.S. Navy investigators have found the wreckage of the cargo ship El Faro, which sank off the Bahamas during Hurricane Joaquin with 33 people aboard, the National Transportation Safety Board has confirmed.

The U.S.-flagged ship was located after a week of searching by a crew from U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command, using sonar equipment. It appears to be in an upright position and in one piece at a depth of about 15,000 feet.

China unveiled its first passenger jet Monday, part of an effort to compete in the lucrative commercial aircraft business now dominated by Boeing and Airbus.

The single-aisle, twin-engine C919 was developed by the state-run Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China, or Comac. The jet was shown to a large crowd of government dignitaries in a hangar at an assembly plant outside Shanghai, near Pudong International Airport.

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International is ending its relationship with Philidor Rx Services, because of questions raised about whether it was using the specialty pharmacy to boost sales of Valeant drugs over cheaper versions.

As a result, Philidor will shut down as soon as possible, The Wall Street Journal reported.

The U.S. economy grew at a considerably slower pace during the third quarter as companies cut back on the size of their inventories, the Commerce Department said.

Growth came in at an annual rate of 1.5 percent — a sharp slowdown from the 3.9 percent gain recorded in the preceding quarter. The economy has grown at about 2 percent so far this year.

Two of the nation's largest drug store chains want to merge, a deal that's certain to face intense scrutiny from federal regulators worried about its potential harm to consumers.

Walgreens Boots Alliance, the company that owns Walgreens drugstores, said yesterday that it has agreed to buy Rite Aid for about $9 a share, in a deal worth about $17 billion.

Lions are rapidly disappearing in large parts of Africa, and their population could be reduced by half outside of protected areas over the next two decades, according to a study published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

A few months ago, Federal Reserve policymakers were all but promising they would raise interest rates before the end of this year. Now, as the U.S. economy shows signs of a slowdown, a hike in 2015 is looking a lot less likely.

The company that makes Legos has landed at the center of a social-media firestorm after Chinese artist Ai Weiwei complained that it refused to supply a bulk order of the toy bricks for his art.

Ai said he wanted to use the bricks for an exhibition on free speech at Australia's National Gallery of Victoria. The museum attempted to place an order but was told by the company that it "cannot approve the use of Legos for political works."

"We've been refused, and the reason is Lego will not support political art, which is very frustrating," Ai said in an interview with NPR.

As criticism mounts over its business practices, multinational drug company Valeant Pharmaceuticals will hold a conference call Monday morning, in an effort to persuade Wall Street not to bail on its stock.

"We look forward to our call on Monday where we will address and refute recent allegations," said J. Michael Pearson, chairman and chief executive officer, in a statement.

U.S. officials have dropped insider trading charges against former hedge fund manager Michael Steinberg, after an appeals court ruling struck down convictions in a related case.

Prosecutors also dropped charges against six cooperating witnesses who had pleaded guilty in the same case.

U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement that the charges against the witnesses "would no longer be in the interest of justice."

The Obama Administration has suggested steps to help Puerto Rico emerge from its financial troubles but says it needs cooperation from Congress to really address the crisis.

The European Union wants Starbucks to pay up to $34 million in back taxes, ruling that the company received illegal state aid from the Netherlands.

EU officials also alleged that Fiat benefited from a similar deal with Luxembourg.

"Tax rulings that artificially reduce a company's tax burden are not in line with EU state aid rules," said EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager. "They are illegal. All companies, big or small, multinational or not, should pay their fair share of tax."

In a blog post published Monday morning, Amazon is pushing back against an August story in The New York Times that portrayed it as a soul-crushing workplace where employees were forced to work long hours and encouraged to tear each other apart at meetings.

She liked it so much, she bought the company.

Oprah Winfrey will acquire a 10 percent stake in Weight Watchers International for $43.2 million and take a seat on its executive board, the company announced today. She will also receive options to buy an additional 5 percent stake.

One person was killed and five were injured late Saturday when a shooter fired on a crowd at Zombicon, a Florida charitable festival where people dress up as zombies.

The shooting sent dozens of festival-goers, many of them in costumes, running through the streets of downtown Fort Myers, Fla., in chaos and panic, according to the News-Press.

The shooter is still at large, police said.

Double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius will be released on parole on Tuesday, one year after his conviction for killing his girlfriend by shooting her through a bathroom door, South African officials say.

He will be held temporarily under house arrest, and his parole will continue through 2019.

Taking on Wall Street makes for good politics in the Democratic Party. And several of the candidates at Tuesday night's debate had tough words about big banks. That was particularly true of former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Although he didn't say so directly, O'Malley suggested several times that consolidation in the banking business was a big factor in the 2008 financial crash and that the U.S. economy remains vulnerable because of it.

The Minnesota dentist who killed Cecil the black-maned lion in Zimbabwe last summer, generating international outrage, won't face charges and can return to the country, government officials said.

Zimbabwe officials announced last summer that they would try to extradite Walter Palmer, the big-game hunter who killed Cecil in a bow-hunt, after allegedly paying $50,000 for the "privilege." But after reviewing the case, they decided Palmer hadn't broken any hunting laws.