Micah Schweizer

Cultural Affairs and Production Director

Phone: 307-766-3587
Email: mschweiz@uwyo.edu

Micah Schweizer oversees arts and culture coverage for Wyoming Public Radio, including the podcasts HumaNature and The Modern West. He’s had a taste of various cultures growing up in Switzerland, studying in France, and living in six states in the U.S. Before moving to Wyoming, he worked as an award-winning public radio reporter, producer, and host at WNIN-FM in southern Indiana. Micah got his start in radio at Wisconsin Public Radio and has contributed to networks including NPR and the BBC. During the 2008 presidential primaries, he was a recurring guest on WNYC’s The Takeaway. He received his B.A. in French and German at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. Before working in radio, Micah was a public school teacher. He lives in Laramie with his wife and four rescued cats. In his free time, Micah can be found playing music on electric bass and Irish tin whistle.

Ways to Connect

Stories about people who grew up skiing.

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Wyoming Has A Shortage Of Women In The Legislature

For years women’s groups in the state have expressed concern about the lack of women in the Wyoming legislature. But it has rarely been this bad. Currently the state ranks 46th with women making up 14 percent. In 2006 the Wyoming women’s legislative caucus was formed to not only support the 14 women serving in the state legislature, but to also recruit female candidates to run for office. It hasn’t gone well.

stephensonmusic.com

In classical music, there’s a long list of composers who are also conductors. One of them is Chicagoan Jim Stephenson. What sets Stephenson apart is that the audience will help him compose the music the Wyoming Symphony Orchestra will play at its family concert on November 8th. Stephenson has performed the ‘Compose Yourself’ program hundreds of times since 2002, but this performance will only be the second time with a full symphony orchestra.

Micah Schweizer

Nearly 150 years ago, Mormon pioneers set out from the Midwest, bound for Salt Lake City. They walked, pulling their belongings in wooden handcarts. Two groups got a late start and were stranded in Wyoming by a devastating October blizzard. And for the past 20 years, thousands of Mormon teenagers have been returning to that site to follow in the footsteps of their ancestors.

When the blizzard struck on October 19th, 1856, the lagging handcart companies were still weeks from Salt Lake City. More than 200 people died of exhaustion, hunger, and cold.

John D. Lukacs

Nearly 70 years after World War II, a little known story of war-time heroism is surfacing. The book “Escape from Davao: The Forgotten Story of the Most Daring Prison Break of the Pacific War” and the documentary film “4-4-43” tell the story of ten American soldiers and two Filipino convicts who escaped a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines.

Stories about riding a horse to school.

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The University of Wyoming Symphony Orchestra’s 2014-15 season will see many soloists joining the orchestra on stage. Opening Night, Thursday, Oct. 2, features a pianist and a singer--and some little-known portions of a well-known work. Conductor Michael Griffith stopped by to chat with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

Dan Hayward

Wyoming’s Red Desert has become an increasingly popular destination for nature photographers. Dan Hayward has been taking pictures of that vast landscape—from the ground and from the air—for three years. On Friday, he’ll present his work in a slide presentation at Central Wyoming College in Riverton. Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer spoke with Hayward about his work in the Red Desert.

fastfilmfestcheyenne.com

Friday is the kickoff for Cheyenne’s Fast Filmmaking Festival. It gives contestants two weeks to film and produce a film highlighting one of the capital city’s historic landmarks. Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer spoke with festival producer Alan O’Hashi.

JenTen Productions

Barns don’t just hold hay. They hold cultural and architectural meaning. A ‘Barn Bash’ Friday, September 19 at the Center for the Arts in Jackson will explore the value of these agrarian artifacts through the premier of a new documentary, a panel discussion, and a barn dance.

Pamela Ten Eyck

A movie that was filmed and produced in Laramie premiers on the big screen tonight at the Gryphon Theatre. London Homer-Wambeam wrote and shot ‘Project Cora’ while he was still in high school. He’s now a freshman at the University of Wyoming, and he stopped by our studios to talk about his Artificial Intelligence romance movie with Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

The Wyoming Humanities Council is staging its second annual Ignite Laramie event on Wednesday, September 10. The audience will hear roughly ten fast-paced mixed-media presentations. Speakers have five minutes to present their ideas, such as what it means to invest in local music, the fallacies in our everyday logic, or how to trust oneself to make hard decisions.

Organizer Jason Burge says the talks are centered on the idea of community.

Stories about getting into trouble.

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Aaron Wallis

It was the Protestant reformer Martin Luther who proposed that we are simultaneously saints and sinners. Jackson artist Aaron Wallis is illustrating the idea by placing drug dealers and gang leaders in the context of Christian iconography: putting halos around criminals' heads. The newest collection of illuminated manuscript prints in his Street Bible series opens August 29th at the Rose and the Pink Garter Theatre in Jackson.

In Jackson, Seasonal Workers Struggle To Find Affordable Housing

The town of Jackson has long struggled to find enough affordable housing for its seasonal workers. Right now, the average rental property there is going for 2800 dollars a month.  But lately, the popularity of house sharing websites have transformed the housing problem into a housing crisis. And that’s got local business owners looking in new places for their for seasonal hires.

Wyoming Art Party

The Wyoming Art Party is a new arts organization. No, we won’t be seeing Art Party candidates on the November ballot; think party, as in fun and festivities. The Wyoming Art Party’s inaugural event opens with a reception Friday, August 22 at a temporary gallery in Laramie. It’s a collaborative exhibit called ‘A Portrait of Wyoming.’ Laramie artists June Glasson and Meg Thompson are the founders of the Wyoming Art Party. They stopped by to explain the project to Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer.

Micah Schweizer

Pierce Pettis is one of America’s finest singer-songwriters. His songs have been covered by artists including Dar Williams, Garth Brooks, and Joan Baez. His rich, chiming guitar sound comes from the use of open tunings. Here’s a song that draws from Pierce’s Alabama roots.

August in Wyoming: Stories of nature and wildlife. 

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A Wyoming author is among this year’s winners of the prestigious PEN Literary Awards, announced this morning in New York.

Nina McConigley is a lecturer in the University of Wyoming’s English Department. Her collection of short stories, ‘Cowboys and East Indians,’ is one of two winners of the PEN Open Book Award. The $5,000 award is for a book-length work by an author of color. McConigley’s father is Irish; her mother is from India. 'Cowboys and East Indians' draws on her multicultural upbringing in Wyoming.

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