Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Meeting in a rare Saturday session, the Senate is debating a $1.1 trillion package that would increase military funding and scale back financial and environmental regulations.

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Updated at 1:55 p.m. ET

Thousands of demonstrators gathered today for a "Justice for All" march in the nation's capital to protest decisions in Missouri and New York not to indict police officers involved in the deaths of two black men.

The Rev. Al Sharpton's National Action Network, the NAACP and the National Urban League were to start at noon at Freedom Plaza and march to the U.S. Capitol, where they will hold a rally featuring the families of several African-Americans who were killed in confrontations with police.

Thailand's crown prince and the woman who would have been on the throne next to him are now officially divorced, the palace announced today in a move that many observers see as a precursor to a possible succession struggle.

It's been a violent 24 hours in Afghanistan:

-- 12 workers clearing mines on Saturday were attacked by Taliban militants and another dozen were wounded, a police spokesman said.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

A shooter wounded two boys and a girl outside a high school in Portland, Ore., in what police said may be a gang-related assault.

The incident occurred near Rosemary Anderson High School. The Oregonian reports that a 17-year-old was shot in the back and another person, a female, was shot in the chest. The newspaper did not give specifics on the third victim.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says it has found the remains of a 19th century passenger steamer that sank near the present-day Golden Gate Bridge at the entrance to San Francisco Bay, killing 128 people, mostly immigrants from China and Japan.

Inbound from Hong Kong, the City of Rio de Janeiro, which came to be known as the "Titanic of the Golden Gate," went down in dense fog after hitting submerged rocks early on the morning of Feb. 22, 1901.

The Great Recession has widened the wealth gap among white, black and Hispanic Americans, with median net worth in white households increasing to 13 times that for African-Americans, a new Pew Research Center study shows.

The study also shows that from 2007 to 2013, the wealth of white households has grown to 10 times that of Hispanic households.

An orphaned southern sea otter pup that was rescued from the California coast and ended up at Chicago's Shedd Aquarium might well be over the moon about her new name: Luna.

The otter had been designated "Pup 681" by the aquarium, which held a contest to name her. More than 10,000 votes were cast, and the name Luna beat out Cali, Ellie, Poppy and Ana.

U.N. talks on global warming are wrapping up in Peru, but a divide between rich and poor countries and how to divvy up targets to reduce greenhouse gases is a key sticking point that has remained unresolved.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has acknowledged that the issue is "hard fought and ... complex," but he says it is crucial that the targets be agreed on before next year's summit in Paris. The talks in Peru end today.

Several thousand hotel guests, many of them conventiongoers dressed as animal characters, were forced to evacuate a suburban Chicago hotel early this morning after a chlorine gas leak was detected. Nineteen people who complained of dizziness and nausea were treated and released from the hospital, according to The Associated Press.

The Chicago Tribune reports:

Syrian state media say Israeli planes hit government-controlled zones in and around Damascus in what independent observers have said was an apparent effort to target Hezbollah arms shipments.

"The Israeli enemy committed aggression against Syria by targeting two safe areas in Damascus province, in all of Dimas and near the Damascus International Airport," state television said, adding that there were no casualties, according to Reuters.

Jason Rezaian, The Washington Post's bureau chief in Tehran who has been held by the Iranian government for more than four months, was formally charged over the weekend, but the specifics are not yet known, his newspaper reports.

Update at 12:05 p.m. ET

More details are trickling in out about this weekend's failed attempt to rescue American photojournalist Luke Somers from his al-Qaida captors in Yemen.

Somers, 33, was held along with a South African teacher, Pierre Korkie; both were killed by their kidnappers when U.S. Navy SEALs were detected before they were able to snatch the captives.

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Six men long detained at Guantanamo Bay – four Syrians, one Tunisian and one Palestinian – were transferred this morning to Uruguay in a deal forged by the White House to reduce the inmate population at the controversial prison, which President Obama has promised to close.

Police in Berkeley, Calif., used smoke, flares and rubber bullets against demonstrators who turned unruly overnight amid rallies to protest the police killings of unarmed black men in Missouri and New York.

The Justice Department is preparing to release new guidelines for some federal agents that would prohibit them from using such factors as religion or sexual orientation to profile individuals, but the new policy would not apply at airports or border crossings.

NPR's Carrie Johnson says the DOJ has been considering the change, expected out any day, for the past five years.

"They will add some new categories that are prohibited, like sexual orientation and religion," Carrie tells Weekend All Things Considered.

Los Angeles police say they will investigate a woman's claims that in the mid-1970s at the age of 15, she was molested by comedian Bill Cosby.

The Associated Press says:

"The investigation was opened Friday after Judy Huth, who is suing Cosby for sexual battery, met with detectives for 90 minutes, Officer Jane Kim said.

"Huth's civil suit claims Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him in a bedroom of the Playboy Mansion around 1974 when she was underage."

A top al-Qaida leader who allegedly planned to bomb passenger trains in New York and London has been killed in a raid by Pakistani troops near the Afghan border, according to the government in Islamabad.

A statement by Pakistan's Inter-Services Public Relations said Adnan Shukrijumah was killed in the raid in the Sheen Warsak region of South Waziristan in west central Pakistan.

An additional 1,000 U.S. troops will remain in Afghanistan for the first several months of 2015, leaving 10,800 in the country at the start of the year, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel told reporters at a briefing in Kabul today.

According to a revised drawdown schedule, the U.S. contingent was to have numbered 9,800, but Hagel said "the president's authorization will not change our troops' missions, or the long-term timeline for our drawdown."

The photo above isn't from the archives. It was taken this week in Oklahoma City, where the price of regular gas has fallen under $2 a gallon. The last time that happened anywhere in the U.S. was in July 2010.

The OnCue filling station is the first in the country to drop its price below the $2/gallon threshold.

The European Court of Human Rights has ordered France to pay up to 7,000 euros in compensation to each of nine Somali pirates who were detained after hijacking two French yachts in the Gulf of Aden in 2008.

The Elgin Marbles, a collection of classical Greek sculptures that has been housed by the British Museum in London for nearly 200 years, will go on loan to Russia in a move Athens, which has long demanded their return, has called "an affront."

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras said in a statement, according to the BBC: "We Greeks are one with our history and civilization, which cannot be broken up, loaned out, or conceded."

A former Chinese domestic security chief has been arrested and expelled from the Communist Party on charges of bribery and leaking state secrets. Zhou Yongkang, who has been under investigation for months, becomes the highest-ranking leader to become ensnared in the country's high-profile crackdown on corruption.

Super Typhoon Hagupit, briefly downgraded before regaining strength, is set to smash into the Philippine coast on Saturday. The massive storm is already forcing tens of thousands of people to flee its predicted path, which might include a direct hit on the capital, Manila.

The Pentagon says it launched a mission in Yemen last month to snatch hostages from al-Qaida-affiliated captors, but that they failed to rescue British-born American Luke Somers among others because they "were not present at the targeted location."

In a written statement released today, Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said the operation involved ground and air components and was conducted in cooperation with the Yemeni military. It said details of the operation remain classified.

A former Texas justice of the peace has been found guilty of capital murder in the shooting deaths of a district attorney, the DA's wife and an assistant prosecutor in a rural suburb of Dallas last year.

Eric Williams, 47, faces a possible death sentence for killing Cynthia McLelland, the wife of slain Kaufman County District Attorney Mike McLelland. He has also been charged separately in the killings of Mike McLelland and prosecutor Mark Hasse, according to The Associated Press.

China says it will halt the controversial practice of harvesting human organs for transplant from executed prisoners beginning on Jan. 1 in what The New York Times describes as "the firmest deadline given to date for ending" the practice.

Update at 9:35 a.m. ET

NASA's Orion spacecraft, which could one day send astronauts to Mars, is stuck on terra firma for at least another day after the space agency's mission control was unable to satisfactorily resolve a number of issues before a 9:45 a.m. ET launch window closed.

In Hong Kong, thousands of pro-democracy protesters wearing hard hats and masks clashed with police as they attempted to storm the office of the territory's leader, who they have repeatedly demanded step down.

Chanting "Surround government headquarters!" and "Open the road!" students marched toward buildings in Admiralty, next to Hong Kong's central business district, according to Reuters.

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