Tom Goldman

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his more than 20 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: I'm Steve Inskeep here to help you argue about something other than politics - college football. On Sunday, we find out who's in and who's out of all the big bowl games. The selection process always gets people riled up because the big prize here is the college football playoff, now in its third year. Four teams get picked. They play. The winner is the national champion. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins...

Voters in seven more states said "yes" to marijuana this month. Pot now is legal for recreational or medicinal use in more than half the country. It's still against federal law and classified as a Schedule 1 drug, meaning U.S. officials consider marijuana to have a high risk of abuse or harm, and no accepted medical use in treatment. Also, it's still banned in professional sports. Many athletes hope that will change as momentum grows nationwide for legalization. That's especially true in the...

To say the mood at Progressive Field in Cleveland was electric the last two nights is the understatement of the baseball season. The first two games of the World Series brought sellout crowds, mostly made up of Indians fans, totaling more than 38,000 both nights. Everywhere you turned, there were happy Clevelanders sporting Indians jerseys, jackets, hats and t-shirts. The Cleveland Indians are hot stuff. Which is why it's confusing to check the year's attendance figures. Cleveland ranked 28...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: The World Series that begins tonight in Cleveland is going to change the course of history for one Midwestern city. Maybe that's an exaggeration. I don't know. But the Chicago Cubs have not won a World Series in 108 years. The Cleveland Indians, though, it's been a mere 68 years. NPR's Tom Goldman is in Cleveland, ready for Game 1. And he did what other baseball fans in Cleveland did last night. He went to the...

The NFL's New York Giants are heading to London for a game against the Los Angeles Rams this Sunday, without their All-Pro kicker Josh Brown. The decision to leave Brown behind comes after new information emerged in a year-and-a-half-old domestic violence case. And suddenly, there are new questions about whether the league adheres to its supposedly tougher policy against domestic violence. In May 2015, Brown was arrested for assaulting his then-wife Molly at their home in Washington state....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Finally time for sports. (SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) SIMON: American and National League Championship Series are underway - LA, Chi-Town, Cleveland and Toronto. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Morning, Tom. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hello. SIMON: Last night, the Cleveland Indians handcuffed the Toronto Blue Jays, didn't they? GOLDMAN: Oh, boy, they did. You know, they won - I'll wait till the theme song goes away. They won......

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: It's hard enough to race against Usain Bolt, but American sprinting star Justin Gatlin also had to deal with booing last night in Rio as well. That happened right before the men's 100 meters final. Gatlin finished second to Bolt. Gatlin has been hearing it from the fans because of his past. He was suspended twice for testing positive for banned drugs. Joining me from Rio is NPR's Tom Goldman. And, Tom, how did...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Yes, Usain Bolt is still the fastest man on Earth. He won the Olympic 100 meters in 2008, then again in 2012. And last night, he officially entered his fastest-man title in the record books. Bolt won the 100 meters in Rio and became the first to win the event in three Olympic Games. NPR's Tom Goldman watched it happen at Rio's Olympic stadium and joins us now. Good morning. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Renee....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Olympic fans, prepare to watch hookers in a scrum who hope not to end up in the sin bin. The lexicon of rugby , and the men's game itself, return to Olympic competition after a 92-year absence. The return in Rio also involves a couple of debuts: It's the first Olympic appearance for women in the sport, and a first for Rugby Sevens. It's a seven-on-seven game. Traditional rugby has 13 or 15 a side. Sevens is a fast, physical and unpredictable game. Rugby organizers hope an Olympic showing will...

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Michael Phelps knows he'll be going to his fifth Olympic Games next month. Phelps officially qualified for Rio on Wednesday, by winning the 200-meter butterfly, a race he described as the hardest swim of his career. He followed that up with a win in the 200-meter individual medley late Friday at the time the U.S. swimming trials in Omaha, and also qualified for the finals for the 100-meter fly on Saturday. The wins had meaning far beyond the pool — a symbolic victory over the personal...

Swimming superstar Michael Phelps made history again Wednesday night. At the U.S. Olympic swimming trials in Omaha, Neb., Phelps qualified for a record fifth Olympic games. He's the first American male swimmer to do that. But Phelps is one of the few veterans having success so far at the trials. That's because a batch of young, first-time Olympians is stealing the show. Youth Winning Out
Many swimming fans have come to Omaha to cheer the familiar – Phelps, Ryan Lochte, Missy Franklin...

Update at 3:15 p.m. ET: Ali's Funeral Set For Friday Muhammad Ali, the man considered the greatest boxer of all time, died late Friday at a hospital in Phoenix at age 74. He was battling respiratory problems. He died of septic shock related to natural causes, with his family at his bedside, according to family spokesman Bob Gunnell. Ali inspired millions by standing up for his principles during the volatile 1960s and by always entertaining — in the boxing ring and in front of a microphone....

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: It is about as exciting as college basketball gets without the sweat and squeaking sneakers and school bands. Of course, we're talking about the televised selection shows picking the teams for the men's and women's Division I tournaments. Yesterday was Selection Sunday for the men. Selection Monday for the women is today. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us now. Good morning. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi,...

Sunday's Super Bowl 50 — Carolina Panthers versus the Denver Broncos — could mark the end of an era. Peyton Manning's last game. The veteran Broncos quarterback turns 40 next month. After a season plagued by injury and poor play, many suggested it was time to retire. Manning fueled speculation about his future after Denver won the AFC Championship game and microphones heard him tell New England head coach Bill Belichick, "This may be my last rodeo." In the run-up to the Super Bowl, Manning...

The education at the Rose City Rowing Club starts long before oars touch the water. The first lesson from head coach Nick Haley is about punctuality. Afternoon practice begins at 4 o'clock sharp at this club in Portland, Ore. The next lesson is about respect. This one's a big deal at Rose City: Respect your fellow teammates, coaches, the sport itself and — today in particular — the equipment. Haley is speaking to more than 100 high school students gathered before him. He notes that several of...

It's the offseason for Major League Baseball, but big news is coming soon. Commissioner Rob Manfred says he will decide by the end of the month whether to reinstate Pete Rose. The former perennial All-Star for the Cincinnati Reds is one of the greatest players ever; many consider his record for most hits in a career — 4,256 — untouchable. Rose, of course, has also been baseball's most celebrated pariah. He was banned in 1989 for betting on the game. Rose has campaigned for reinstatement in...

In football, a sport that demands military-style discipline and singular focus, there's ample precedent for speaking out against the status quo. What happened at the University of Missouri in recent days, with African-American football players calling for a boycott with the support of coaches, is dramatic, but it's the kind of action that was quite common around 50 years ago, according to historian Lane Demas, a professor at Central Michigan University. "There's a three-year period of roughly...

Baseball is a team sport. But as the Kansas City Royals and New York Mets prepare to play Game 1 of the World Series tonight, there's a tremendous amount of focus on one player in particular. And the spotlight is on New York second baseman Daniel Murphy for good reason. Murphy, 30, who has played for the Mets his entire major league career, is on an unprecedented postseason hitting streak. Murphy has hit a home run in a record six straight games. He has seven homers overall in the playoffs...

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: The investigation continues into the how and why a gunman killed nine people on a community college campus in Roseburg, Ore., last Thursday. Authorities now say 26-year-old Chris Harper-Mercer killed himself after exchanging gunfire with police. As more details emerge, NPR's Tom Goldman reports that some residents of the small town are struggling for a bit of normalcy. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Which meant...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Authorities in Roseburg, Ore., have identified the nine people who died yesterday in this country’s latest mass shooting. The victims range in ages from 18 to 67. They died when a gunman opened fire on the campus of Umpqua Community College in Roseburg. There’s also news today about the investigation of the attack, which left the gunman dead as well. NPR’s Tom Goldman is in Roseburg and filed this report...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: OK, some tennis news now. So spoiler alert - Italian Flavia Pennetta has won the women's final at the U.S. Open. She defeated fellow Italian Roberta Vinci in straight sets. Tomorrow, Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer will face off in the men's final and all eyes will again be on Arthur Ashe Stadium. Well, NPR's Tom Goldman is at the tournament, and he's also had his eyes on some of the more overlooked...

It's been less than a year since a domestic violence scandal erupted in the National Football League. The infamous Ray Rice video from last September and the league's mishandling of the case plunged the NFL into an unprecedented crisis. It also spurred the league into action after years of doing little or nothing about the problem of domestic violence. The problem continues, and so do the efforts to fight it. Rewind to last September when NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell publicly repented. "I...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: And the winner is... (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED MAN: The International Olympic Committee has the honor to announce the host city of the Olympic Winter Games 2022 - Beijing. (APPLAUSE) MONTAGNE: Yes, Beijing, host of the 2008 summer games will now get the honors for the 2022 Winter Olympics as well. The process of choosing a host for this event has been steeped in controversy. It's...

The United States is basketball crazy. For boys and girls who play sports, basketball is the most popular choice. But as Americans age, a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health reveals, there's a widening gender gap when it comes to hoops. Why are adult female basketball players giving up the game they once loved? Certainly not all women are giving up the sport. On a hot summer evening in Portland, Ore., Tanya Martin is running...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: Sunday in Vancouver it's a first-ever Women's World Cup finals rematch as the U.S. plays Japan. Japan beat the U.S. for the soccer championship in 2011. This time around, the Americans are brimming with confidence after defeating No. 1 ranked Germany in the semifinals. Japan needed some luck to get to the title game. NPR's Tom Goldman spoke to fans in soccer-crazy Portland, Ore. about this weekend's...

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