Meeteetse Museum

Sep 4, 2013

Meeteetse Museum contains exciting exhibits that tell the story of Meeteetse and the surrounding area. These include “Mike Crocker’s Wild Sheep of North America,” “Made in Meeteetse: the Black-Footed Ferret,” the Forest Service Cabin, the “Meeteetse Mercantile,” and the Saddle Room. Meeteetse Museum is also home to a number of important western sculptures by the late Harry Jackson.

Public Programming

Oral History Collection Program
The mission of the Oral History Program is to record the stories and detailed memories of former and current Meeteetse area residents. We are particularly interested in recording first-hand stories and remembrances from the early and middle twentieth century. If you would like to donate an oral history so that future generations can know our history, please contact the museum.

Photograph Digitization Project
Meeteetse Museums is currently working to digitize the area’s photographs. Once digitized, photos will be viewable on publicly accessed kiosks located at the museum. Digitization, which involves scanning and systematically recording information, is the best way of insuring that the public has access to its history. It also insures the safety of Meeteetse’s priceless historical images.

Courtesy of http://www.meeteetsemuseums.org/meeteetse_museum.html .

Tours

Annual Tour of Arland

Meeteetse Museums hosts a free annual tour of the historic Arland townsite and cemetery each year on the first Saturday in October. The tour generally leaves from Meeteetse Museum at 1947 State Street at 1 p.m. Clay Gibbons leads the tour and offers up many fascinating tales about the former town and the people who lived there.

Arland has a unique and violent past. One of the local residents was Belle Drewry. Known as the “Woman in Blue,” Drewry became involved in a love triangle that ended in murder. Other prominent citizens were Bill Gallagher, “Blind Bill” Hoolihan, Broken Nose Jackson, Bill Landon, Rose Williams, and Will Wheaton. Many of these individuals are reported to have died in a “web of lawlessness, romance, intrigue and murder.”

Meeteetse Museums asks tour participants to dress appropriately for the weather, wear walking or hiking shoes, and bring drinking water. Car-pooling is encouraged. A signed release form is required and can be completed at the museum prior to departure.

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Annual Tour of Kirwin

In middle August, Meeteetse Museums hosts a free annual tour of the ghost town of Kirwin. Hosted by the Dunrud family, the tour leaves Meeteetse Museum at 8 a.m. Arrival at Kirwin is at approximately 8:45. The tour offers an up-close and personal look at the abandoned mining town located in the high Absaroka Mountains. Tour members will explore the storage/shop facilities, cabins, sheds, mining offices, various collapsed structures, assay office, and machinery remaining at the location. Participants may also take a short hike to view the beginning foundation of Amelia Earhart’s cabin, intended to be her summer home. Construction ended in 1937 when the famous aviatrix disappeared over the Pacific Ocean.

Although participants may drive their own vehicles, car-pooling is encouraged. High clearance four-wheel-drive vehicles are required. Tour members should bring chairs, weather-appropriate clothing, and a lunch. Pre-registration is NOT required. However, if you do not have a four-wheel-drive vehicle the museum will help you find a ride with someone who does.

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Medicine Lodge State Archaeological Site Tour

In late August, Meeteetse Museums hosts a free tour to Medicine Lodge State Archaeological Site. The tour is led by Dr. Lawrence Todd, Archeologist and Professor Emeritus in Anthropology from Colorado State University. Dr. Todd is also a Fellow at the University of Texas – Austin. Participants will not only be provided with a tour of the site’s petroglyphs and pictographs by one of this country’s foremost archaeologists, but they will encounter some of Wyoming’s most beautiful scenery as well.

The Medicine Lodge Site near Hyattville has long been known for its Indian pictographs and petroglyphs.  But the site’s significance became even more apparent in 1969 when Dr. George Frison, then Wyoming State Archaeologist, discovered over sixty levels of human occupation that spanned some 10,000 years. His digs provided information that was vital to the understanding of the archaeology of the Big Horn Basin. In addition to uncovering information about the lifestyles of the peoples who once inhabited the site, Frison also found material items, including fire pits, manos and mutates, projectile points, and food storage pits. 

Those taking part in the tour meet at Meeteetse Museums by 8:00 a.m where they register. Participants may also meet up with the tour group at the site about 9:30 and register then if this is more convenient.  The tour at Medicine Lodge lasts until sometime after lunch. Participants may then elect to continue the tour with Dr. Todd at the Colby Mammoth Kill Site and the Washakie Museum and Cultural Center at Worland. Admission to these locations is also free. The Colby Mammoth Kill Site dates back 11,000 years and is one of the largest Clovis mammoth kill sites in North America. The Washakie Museum features exhibits on the natural, prehistory, and more recent history of the Big Horn Basin. Participants are encouraged to car-pool and to bring a picnic lunch. For further information about the 2012 tour, call Meeteetse Museums at 307-868-2423.

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Tour of Legend Rock State Petroglyph Site

Meeteetse Museums encourages everyone to join renowned archeologist Dr. Larry Todd in June for a fun and educational tour to Legend Rock State Petroglyph Site, about 37 miles south of Meeteetse. Legend Rock is “one of the oldest and best examples of the Dinwoody rock art in the world” where the public can view nearly 300 individual petroglyphs created during the past few thousand years. The tour is led by Dr. Todd, Professor Emeritus, Colorado State University and a Research Fellow, Anthropology, University of Texas, Austin. Participants meet at Meeteetse Museums by 8:30 a.m. to sign the event registration form. Departure is at 9 a.m. Participants drive their own vehicles from Meeteetse, although car-pooling is encouraged. Legend Rock is easily accessed by cars, campers, motor homes, and vehicles pulling trailers. Participants are asked to bring their own lunches and drinks.

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Fall Tour of the Double Dee Ranch

Meeteetse Museums will be hosting a September tour of the Double Dee Ranch. The ranch, located in the beautiful mountains of the Shoshone National Forest, was established by Carl Dunrud in 1931 and operated as a dude ranch through 1942. Many famous guests stayed there, including Amelia Earhart. The ranch has recently been the focus of a major rehabilitation effort led by HistoriCorps, an organization whose mission is to save historic places. Crews of volunteers and others have recently reconstructed the barn’s collapsed gambrel roof; replaced and repaired rotted sill logs on the barn; and re-roofed the cabin and replaced its sill logs. The cabin will eventually serve as an on-site bathhouse.

The tour is led by Jim and Rich Dunrud, who are sons of Carl Dunrud. They offer up the real history of the ranch, tell about the famous guests, and what life was life on the ranch during its heyday. The tour leaves at 9 a.m. from Meeteetse Museums. Four-wheel-drive, high clearance vehicles are needed. Car-pooling is encouraged. The museum will assist in arranging rides for those without four-wheel-drive. Participants are asked to bring a lunch, water, and to wear weather-appropriate clothing.

For more information, visit: http://www.meeteetsemuseums.org/meeteetse_museum.html .