All Things Considered on Wyoming Public Radio

Monday - Friday 4:00PM-7:00PM and Saturday - Sunday 5:00PM-6:00PM
  • Hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Ari Shapiro, Kelly McEvers, Michel Martin

All Things Considered

All Things Considered is the most listened-to afternoon drive-time news radio program in the country.  ATC offers a potent mix of national and international news with regular state news updates and feature reports from the Wyoming Public Radio newsroom. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Audie CornishKelly McEversAri Shapiro, and Robert Siegel. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted today by Michel Martin.

Commentary: Drunk Teen, Angry Dad

Dec 30, 2015
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Parenting is the toughest job you'll ever love. And among the toughest situations for parents is controlling themselves when a teenager stumbles home, cursing and drunk.

Spotify, the groundbreaking streaming music service, is facing a class-action lawsuit alleging that it violates the copyrights of thousands of independent musicians.

If the songwriters prevail it could cost Spotify tens of millions of dollars in unpaid royalties. And according to experts in the music industry, this may be only the beginning, because other streaming services reportedly commit the same violations.

When Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman was published earlier this year, readers learned that this much anticipated "second book" by Lee was actually a first draft of what would later become the beloved To Kill a Mockingbird. Lee radically revised this early version of the book on the advice of her editor, Tay Hohoff. That made us wonder: How much do editors shape the final book we read?

Political violence has engulfed the African nation of Burundi. The U.N. Security Council has passed a resolution to try and prevent potential genocide, while refugees have been pouring into neighboring Rwanda. Among them is a group of musicians who fled their homes without any instruments.

How To Annoy Your Dad: Play The Harpsichord

Dec 29, 2015
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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's not every day that you get to hear a lively discussion about a musical instrument that was once said to sound like two skeletons copulating on a roof.

(SOUNDBITE OF MAHAN ESFAHANI SONG)

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Shakira Crawford, a single mother in New York City, struggles to find a landlord who will accept her city voucher to pay rent.

For more on this report, visit WNYC's "The Long Way Home" series page.

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Capitol Hill Political Staffers Find Their Zen

Dec 26, 2015

Behind every lawmaker on Capitol Hill are dozens of young, ambitious staff members. Frequently pale from exhaustion, they work frenetically, touting the demanding work culture like a badge of honor.

Despite the sense of glory they ascribe to this exhausting pace, there is at least one place where staffers aren't judged for taking a moment to breathe.

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Found Recipes: 'Wurst Cakes'

Dec 25, 2015
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We have a story now about conflict and cookies. It's told by writer Diana Abu-Jaber for our Found Recipes series. We'll get to the conflict in a minute. The cookies come first. Abu-Jaber's German-American grandmother would make them every year.

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Cooking gadgets seem to be a solid go-to when you're not sure what to give someone. Who wouldn't be charmed with a laser-guided pizza cutter? A one-click butter dispenser? An electric bacon-bowl maker?

The terrorist attacks in Paris this year — in January and November — were both carried out by French citizens who became Islamist radicals. The phenomenon of home-grown terrorism first came to light here three years ago, when a French citizen of Algerian descent killed a teacher and three children at a Jewish school and three French soldiers in a rampage in southwestern France.

The Moroccan-born mother of one of those soldiers, who was Muslim, has led a personal battle ever since.

If you are eating turkey this Christmas out of some sense of tradition, food historian Ivan Day says, put down that drumstick. After studying English cookbooks hundreds of years old, Day says the giant bird isn't even that traditional. Besides, he says, "It's a dry wasteland of flavorless meat."

Sure, the first turkey came to England in the 1600s. It was an exotic "treat" from the New World. But a time traveler from Shakespeare's time wouldn't understand why everyone in the modern world was having the same dull bird on Christmas night.

Ninety-year-old Hector Black has been on Radiolab and StoryCorps, talking about how he forgave the man who murdered one of his daughters.

But he tells NPR's Ari Shapiro a different story — one he hasn't shared before. It's his life as a closeted gay man — a husband and a father — who didn't come out until he was 70 years old.

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