All Things Considered on Wyoming Public Radio

Monday - Friday 4:00PM-7:00PM and Saturday - Sunday 5:00PM-6:00PM
  • Hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Ari Shapiro, Kelly McEvers, Michel Martin

All Things Considered

All Things Considered is the most listened-to afternoon drive-time news radio program in the country.  ATC offers a potent mix of national and international news with regular state news updates and feature reports from the Wyoming Public Radio newsroom. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Audie CornishKelly McEversAri Shapiro, and Robert Siegel. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted today by Michel Martin.


MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: As ISIS militants have rolled south through Iraq, closing in on Baghdad, there's a very different story in the northern city of Kirkuk. There Kurdish peshmerga soldiers have taken over after the Iraqi army fled.

Kirkuk is a huge prize. It's got rich oilfields, and for years, the city has been hotly contested between Kurds and the Iraqi government. I'm joined now by the Kurdish governor of the Kirkuk province, Dr. Najmaldin Karim. Dr. Karim, welcome to the program.


Each line of work has its own cryptic code: words and phrases that would baffle any outsider. These terms may sound like nonsense to someone with untrained ears, but to those who operate in a certain world, their meanings are as clear as day.

To get a better handle on some of the stranger things people say at work, All Things Considered is kicking off a new series called "Trade Lingo." It's a quest to mine the jewels of meaning beneath the jargon.

As the federal government presses colleges to improve the way they handle cases of sexual assault, schools are turning their focus to defining "consent" — how to distinguish between activity that's consensual and activity that's not.

About two dozen dads — all African-Americans, ranging in age from their early 20s to late 40s — are standing in a circle participating in a call-and-response exercise:

Call: You done broke them chains.
Response: From my body and my brain!
Call: But you was deaf, dumb and blind.
Response: 'Til I took back my mind!

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Born Ruby Ann Wallace in the early 1920s in Cleveland, actress and civil rights activist Ruby Dee most identified with the part of New York City where she was raised.

"I don't know who I would be if I weren't this child from Harlem, this woman from Harlem. It's in me so deep," Dee told NPR's Tell Me More in 2007.

She died Wednesday of natural causes at her home in New Rochelle, N.Y., surrounded by her children and grandchildren. She was 91.

A food fight at the U.S. Supreme Court ended in a unanimous decision on Thursday.

The justices ruled that POM Wonderful can go forward with a lawsuit alleging Coca-Cola Co. tricked consumers and stole business from POM with false and misleading juice labels.

The case centers on a product aimed at health-conscious consumers: pomegranate-blueberry juice.

The Library of Congress announced Thursday that the nation's next poet laureate will be Charles Wright, a retired professor at the University of Virginia.

"I'm very honored and flattered to be picked, but also somewhat confused," the poet told The New York Times. "I really don't know what I'm supposed to do. But as soon as I find out, I'll do it."

Brazil and Croatia face off in the first game of the 2014 World Cup. Organizers hope the start of the tournament directs attention back on the field and away from the problems in preparation.

"It was time to leave the building."

So begins a new book by John Browne, former CEO of the energy giant BP. But that sentence could easily have read: "It was time to leave the closet."

During his 12 years as CEO, he never discussed his sexuality in the workplace. That changed in 2007, when his relationship with a male escort was exposed and Browne resigned amid an ensuing scandal. At the time, he said in a statement, "I have always regarded my sexuality as a personal matter, to be kept private."

A shift in power is underway in Iraq, where the jihadi group ISIS has captured several cities in a recent offensive. Jane Arraf is a reporter for Al Jazeera America, and she comments on the violence.



U.S. relations with Russia are at their lowest point since the Cold War thanks to the crisis in Ukraine. Russian defense officials are talking about a new doctrine of subversive warfare between major world powers. They accuse the West of using popular uprisings to topple unfriendly governments. And some analysts say Moscow itself is employing that strategy in eastern Ukraine. More from NPR's Corey Flintoff.

Semoran Boulevard in Orlando, lined with gas stations, strip malls and bus stops, is a good example of what's wrong with the roads in this busy Florida city.

It's the most dangerous street in a city that ranks No. 1 in the nation for pedestrian accidents, according to a recent national study. There have been 28 crashes involving pedestrians — and six deaths — on this stretch of road over the past seven years.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel testified before the House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday, defending the prisoner swap that freed Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit



Mallyveen Teah, 53, has been homeless or couch surfing on and off for the past 25 years. Now, he walks from his job at a construction site in Arlington, Va., to his new home, a one-bedroom apartment.

"Something as simple as giving a person a set of keys to their own place makes a huge difference in terms of their outlook on life, the world," he says.

(This is Part 2 of a two-part report. Read the full piece here.)

On the surface, the PS 177 Technology Band looks like a typical high school orchestra. But there are two big differences. First, while they use traditional instruments, they also play iPads. And all of the band members have disabilities. Some have autism spectrum disorders.

"I'm Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I'm in ninth grade. I'm four grades away from college."



From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: And I'm Melissa Block. Republicans are reeling from the

It isn't easy being a World Cup fan in a country where spouses and bosses just don't understand soccer. WNYC's Jim O'Grady reports that some immigrants with World Cup fever in the U.S. must go to great lengths to catch their home country's games on TV.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit



This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.


Eric Cantor became the first house majority leader ever to lose a primary, losing the GOP nomination to Tea Party challenger David Brat in the Republican primary.

In a surprise result, voters in Virginia's 7th Congressional District have dealt a defeat to House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, nominating Tea Party challenger David Brat instead in the GOP primary.

The car industry is required to raise the average fuel efficiency of its vehicles to 54.5 miles a gallon by 2025. But consumers have been reluctant to adopt hybrid technology that'll get the industry there quicker.

That means the car companies have to find other ways to get fuel savings.

If you were to guess, how important would you say fuel economy is to the car business? How much of the research and development is going into making cars more efficient?

A U.S. appeals court has ruled against a group of authors, deciding in favor of a consortium of universities in a case that hinged on copyright law and provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The universities had allowed Google to make digital copies of more than 10 million books so that they could be searchable by specific terms.

Anyone who has eaten many plates of blackened, mangy-looking jerk chicken might get the impression that Caribbean cooking is fairly limited. The cuisine of most of the English-speaking islands is often lumped under the umbrella of stews, dumplings and pineapple-strewn desserts.

But Suzanne and Michelle Rousseau say there's much more to island cooking. They're sisters and cooks based in Jamaica, and their cookbook Caribbean Potluck introduces a new way of thinking about food from their homeland.

You may have noticed a trend clinking around on the shelves of your local liquor store: More and more fancy craft beer is showing up in aluminum cans.

Larry Wilmore just landed the second-toughest job in TV.

The toughest gig falls to Stephen Colbert, who will replace late-night talk icon David Letterman on CBS next year. But Wilmore has been named to replace Colbert, leading a show that will tackle topics barely referenced on television: race and diversity.

And Wilmore admits to just one teeny, tiny concern about replacing Colbert: He might screw it up pretty badly. And then they'd never let another black guy host another late-night TV talk show.

Sitting in a dentist's chair hardly rates as a vacation. But every year, tens of thousands of people go to a tiny border town near Yuma, Ariz., that has proclaimed itself the dental capital of Mexico.

Los Algodones is a virtual dental factory. Some 350 dentists work within a few blocks of downtown. Because of the low prices and fast service, most patients come for major work.

Why NYC Is Afraid Of Free Lunch For All

Jun 9, 2014

More than 30 million kids a year participate in the National School Lunch Program, getting free or reduced-price meals at school. Hunger experts believe many more qualify but don't use it because a.) their families haven't filled out the necessary paperwork or b.) they don't want to be seen as poor.