All Things Considered on Wyoming Public Radio

Monday - Friday 4:00PM-7:00PM
Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Composer ID: 
5187f61ee1c8c26fe80558c7|5187f617e1c8c26fe80558ab

Pages

Analysis
1:00 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

No Major Violence During Egyptian Elections

Egyptian voters in Cairo, Alexandria and several other major cities are voting Monday in the first stage of the country's parliamentary election. Turn out is heavy and so far there has been no major violence. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

Music Interviews
11:12 am
Mon November 28, 2011

'Moves Like Jagger': The Making Of Maroon 5's Mega-Hit

Adam Levine (center) and the rest of Maroon 5.
Matt Beard

The song "Moves Like Jagger" has been on the Billboard Hot 100 for five months — it peaked at No. 1 and is still holding on at No. 5. The band behind the song is Maroon 5, led by singer and songwriter Adam Levine, who also works as a coach on the TV singing competition The Voice.

Read more
Politics
3:00 am
Mon November 28, 2011

Obama Office Alters More Federal Rules Than Bush

Cass Sunstein is the director of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. A new study finds that the office has altered more federal regulations under President Obama than it did under George W. Bush.
AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 4:26 pm

Tucked away in a corner of the White House's Old Executive Office Building, an office that most people have never heard of affects millions of Americans' lives. It's the last hurdle that every proposed regulation must surmount before seeing the light of day. And a new study of this obscure part of the government suggests that President Obama is altering more of those regulations than President George W. Bush did.

Read more
NPR Story
3:33 pm
Sun November 27, 2011

World Playlist: What's Hot In Hong Kong And Dakar?

Whether you want to or not, you've probably heard the songs on the top-100 list in the U.S. But do you know what's hot right now in West Africa or China? Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rachel Martin finds out what music is popular in Hong Kong and Dakar by talking to music critics Ben Sin and Rose Skelton. They each pick three favorite songs that best represent the music scene in their cities.

Music Lists
2:32 pm
Sun November 27, 2011

Chart Hits From Hong Kong And Senegal

Hong Kong cantopop star Kay Tse performs in 2009.
Lai Seng Sin AP

Originally published on Sun November 27, 2011 8:48 pm

Read more
Movies
1:00 pm
Sun November 27, 2011

Praise Puts 'Tyrannosaur' Filmmaker In The Spotlight

Writer-director Paddy Considine's debut film, Tyrannosaur, is a favorite of critics this year. It's generating Oscar buzz and has earned Sundance Festival awards for Considine's directing and the film's lead actors. the film tackles dark themes like death and spousal abuse, but a message of hope manages to shine through. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rachel Martin talks to Paddy Considine about writing and directing the film, which is in theaters now.

World
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Alleged NATO Attack Strains U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Pakistan says 25 of its soldiers were killed in a NATO helicopter attack on a checkpoint at the Afghan border. NATO says it is investigating what happened. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Quil Lawrence about the incident, which has further exacerbated U.S.-Pakistan tensions.

Analysis
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Week In News: Pakistan Rift, Egypt Protests, GOP Debate

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:05 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

With more on this story and the rest of the week's news, we're joined now by Doyle McManus. He's the Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, and he has graciously agreed to stand in for our regular news analyst, James Fallows. Doyle, thanks so much for being with us.

DOYLE MCMANUS: Thank you for having me.

Read more
Space
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Cruising To Mars: The Rover's Tasks

NASA launched the Mars Science Laboratory from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Saturday. The MSL is five times heavier than the rovers currently on Mars and has twice as many scientific instruments. It will take nine months for the spacecraft to reach the Red Planet, and there's plenty of things for it to do before then.

The Impact of War
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Marine's Life Forever Altered By War

Andrew Robinson was injured by a roadside bomb during his second deployment to Iraq. Now a quadriplegic, he says he is learning how to use his limited mobility and is proud of having protected his fellow soldiers. He is especially motivated because his wife is expecting twins next month.

Author Interviews
11:23 am
Sat November 26, 2011

'Chicks With Guns': A Picture Of Gun-Toting Women

Photographer Lindsay McCrum's new book includes images of women who feel that hunting is a way to bring people and family together. Among those women is Alexandra, who poses for McCrum with her son, Truett, and her Ithaca 20-gauge side-by-side shotgun.
Lindsay McCrum

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:05 pm

If you turn to page 109 of Lindsay McCrum's photo book, you'll see a photo of a woman wearing jeans and a green baseball cap standing in a grassy field. She's looking straight at the camera, clutching a semi-automatic rifle as if it were a water bottle. Standing between her legs is her son, his blond hair peeking out from behind her thigh as he poses with his toy gun, a miniature of his mother's.

Read more
Music
3:30 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

For Pesky Relatives, A CD-Buying Gift Guide

Shabazz Palaces.
David Belisle and Leif Podhajsky

When Rachel Martin was given a slot guest-hosting weekends at All Things Considered, she took the opportunity to get a little holiday shopping out of the way. Needing musical stocking-stuffers for a few pesky relatives — her fiance's mom, for example, or her dad, who likes "Tchaikovsky and Johnny Cash" — she consulted NPR Music's Stephen Thompson, and asked him for some tips.

Read more
NPR Story
2:21 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Court Ruling Could Alter Marine Parks Permanently

Last year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited SeaWorld following the death of a killer whale trainer. If a Florida court rules in favor of OSHA, employees of SeaWorld and other parks like it will no longer be able to come into direct contact with whales unless there is a barrier between them. Guy Raz speaks to Tim Zimmermann, a correspondent for Outside Magazine, about the ongoing legal dispute.

Opinion
2:21 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Letters: A Thanksgiving Tale

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 2:55 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. And now it's time for your letters - all about our annual Thanksgiving Day story by writer Bailey White. This year, Bailey told us about a Florida painter who moved to Vermont, where he has trouble fitting in. At a neighbor's suggestion, he turns to raising turkeys.

Read more
NPR Story
2:21 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Political Protests In Egypt Intensify, Expand

Egypt's military rulers named a former prime minister under Hosni Mubarak to head the new government. The move is likely to further incite the tens of thousands of protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square, demanding the resignation of the ruling military council. And for the first time, pro-military protesters gathered in another of Cairo's squares.

NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Week In Politics: Taking The Country's Pulse

Guy Raz talks with our weekly commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times, about Congress' tough spot, observations on the political divide, economic mobility and disagreement over core values.

Books
12:11 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Bailey White's Thanksgiving Story: 'Call It Even'

iStockphoto.com

It's been an All Things Considered Thanksgiving tradition since 1991— a Bailey White original short story. Over the years, White's stories have included tales about a rose queen, a telephone man, an ostrich farmer and a wife exacting revenge. This year, White presents "Call It Even." It's about a shy painter who moves from Florida to Vermont and wants to feel like he fits in — so he raises a dozen turkeys.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:00 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Ingrid Gerdes: A Tomboy With Soul

Ingrid Gerdes says she is influenced by Southern soul-blues.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 3:28 pm

Originally from Springfield, Mo., "the Ozarks area of Missouri," Ingrid Gerdes is a neo-soul performer out of Boston, but she considers herself a Southern singer. Her latest album is titled Shed.

Read more
Planet Money
2:28 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Boom Town, U.S.A.

Brandi and Kaylee plan to open a truck repair shop when they graduate from high school.
Robert Smith NPR

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 4:12 pm

In the small-town of Elko, ambition looks like high-heel suede booties on the floor of the auto shop at the local high school.

Brandi and Kaylee look like the Olsen twins. And they're the best auto-shop students at Elko High. The girls have a plan. Everyday out the school window, they see trucks heading up to the gold mines. Day and night. So, the girls figure, why not open a truck repair shop after they graduate?

"In Elko we've been really blessed and really lucky to actually have a good economy," Kaylee says. "We can actually have our hopes and dreams."

Read more
Music Interviews
2:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Robert Johnson And Pablo Casals' Game-Changers Turn 75

Spanish musician and composer Pablo Casals, playing the cello in 1936.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 1:45 pm

Nov. 23, 1936, was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, each stepped up to a microphone and began to play. One was a cello prodigy who had performed for the queen of Spain; the other was a guitar player in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on that day, Pablo Casals and Robert Johnson each made recordings that would change music history.

Read more
NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Casels, Johnson And The Day That Changed Musical History

Seventy-five years ago Wednesday, two men, an ocean apart, stepped up to microphones. One man was a cello prodigy who had played for the queen of Spain. The other was the son of black sharecroppers, a regular in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on Nov. 23, 1936, Robert Johnson and Pablo Casals each walked into a room alone with their instruments. And on that day, each made recordings that would change music history.

Law
6:09 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Government Whistle-Blowers Gain New Advocate

Carolyn Lerner is the new head of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.
Peter Krogh Courtesy of U.S. Office of Special Counsel

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is one of those small corners of the government with an important mission: It's supposed to help protect federal whistle-blowers and shield civil service workers from politics.

But during the Bush years, the office was engulfed in scandal. It was raided by FBI agents, and its chief was indicted for obstructing justice.

It's into that unsettled environment that the new leader, Carolyn Lerner, arrived five months ago. And good government groups say she's already taking the office in new directions.

Read more
Planet Money
2:17 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

The National Debt: What The Left And Right Agree On

Supercommittee members, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona and Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 9:15 am

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

Read more
Economy
4:20 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Obama Blames Republicans For Debt Panel's Failure

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 7:27 pm

President Obama Monday put the blame for the supercommittee's failure squarely on congressional Republicans — and their unwillingness to consider higher taxes on the wealthy. Obama also threatened to veto any effort to escape from the automatic spending cuts agreed to in August without a balanced plan to reduce the deficit. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Scott Horsley for more.

Politics
4:17 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Supercommittee Fails To Reach Debt Deal

The bipartisan supercommittee says it failed to reach a deficit-reduction deal. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks to Robert Siegel with the latest from Capitol Hill.

Three Books...
2:08 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Presidents And Pilgrims: 3 Boundary Pushing Books

Donna Neary flickr.com

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 7:27 pm

With Thanksgiving hard upon us, now is a good time to think about our past. History writers can tell the best stories from centuries of human achievement and folly, yet too often they produce recitations of one damned thing after another. A few, though, combine a respect for accuracy with a deep understanding of the longings, fears and triumphs of the people of our past. Such books make magic.

Read more
Music Interviews
1:21 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Yo-Yo Ma's Bluegrass-Inspired 'Goat Rodeo'

Yo-Yo Ma's latest Americana exploration features his work with mandolinist Chris Thile, bassist Edgar Meyer and fiddler Stuart Duncan.
Jeremy Cowart

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 11:27 am

A sense of humor comes through The Goat Rodeo Sessions, the latest Americana exploration for the world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma.

Read more
Television
3:48 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

How One Man Played 'Moneyball' With 'Jeopardy!'

Roger Craig poses with Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek after winning $250,000 in last week's Tournament of Champions.
Carol Kaelson Sony Pictures

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 4:32 pm

One night last September, Roger Craig, a computer scientist from Newark, Del., was about to make history.

In his second appearance on Jeopardy!, he'd given one of the most dominant performances ever seen on the show.

Read more
NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Egyptian Security Cracks Down In Tahrir Square

A second uprising seems to be developing in Cairo. Protesters in Tahrir Square, angry with the military-led transitional government, increased in number recently as police clashes with them have become more violent. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with reporter Merrit Kennedy about the situation in Egypt.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Libya Weighs Life After Gadhafi

It's been one month since Moammar Gadhafi's death. Libyans were celebrating within hours of his killing. A month later, the jubilance has waned and the violence continues. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with New York Times correspondent Clifford Krauss from Tripoli.

Pages