All Things Considered on Wyoming Public Radio

Monday - Friday 4:00PM-7:00PM
Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block , Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Composer ID: 
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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 30, 2011

Medal Of Honor Winner Sues Defense Contractor

Guy Raz speaks with Julian Barnes, the Wall Street Journal's Pentagon reporter, about Dakota Meyer, a Marine who was recently awarded the Medal of Honor. Meyer is suing a defense contractor that he worked with, alleging they blocked him from another job in the defense industry as retaliation for his objections to selling high-tech instruments to the Pakistani military.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 30, 2011

Letters: Berea College; Ruth Stone; 'Moves Like Jagger'

Melissa Block and Guy Raz read emails from listeners about a report on Kentucky's Berea College, about Melissa's remembrance of Vermont poet Ruth Stone, and about the other person responsible for that mega-hit earworm "Moves Like Jagger."

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 30, 2011

Central Banks Act To Avert Banking Crisis

The major central banks of the world moved Wednesday to prevent a banking crisis in Europe. They're providing more liquidity to the European banking system in hopes that big banks there will remain solvent and continue to make loans. The coordinated move by the central banks sent stock markets soaring. But it will not even begin to fix Europe's fundamental economic problems.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 30, 2011

Clinton Visits Myanmar

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in Myanmar, also known as Burma, to see if the county's leaders are serious about political reform. Myanmar has long been under international sanctions because of the repressive nature of the military junta that held power until recently. But there are signs that a new civilian government is loosening the military's grip.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 30, 2011

John Hinckley Faces Hearing

A hearing opens Wednesday for John Hinckley, who attempted to assassinate President Reagan 30 years ago and was found not guilty by reason of insanity. He was sent to a mental institution but is now seeking more privileges that could lead to his living full-time outside the hospital.

It's All Politics
5:27 pm
Tue November 29, 2011

Barney Frank's Two Top Goals: Protecting Wall St Reform, Social Spending

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 5:49 pm

Rep. Barney Frank, the long-time liberal voice (and a fast-talking, brusque one at that) who announced he won't be running for re-election, discussed with NPR's Guy Raz, co-host of All Things Considered, the items of unfinished business he plans attend to during his remaining year in Congress.

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Middle East
1:45 pm
Tue November 29, 2011

Report Says Syrian Forces Have Killed 256 Children

Syrian has come under increasing international pressure in recent days. On Monday, Syrians protested in the capital Damascus against the Arab League's decision to impose sanctions. Syria has also come under sharp criticism from an independent commission that accused the security forces of systematically carrying out abuses against anti-government demonstrators.
Yin Bogu Xinhua /Landov

An independent commission has released a blistering human rights report that says Syria's security forces have carried out widespread abuses against protesters, including murder and torture.

The commission, appointed by the U.N.'s Human Rights Council, based its report on interviews with more than 220 witnesses or victims of abuse by Syrian security forces. The panel says it collected a solid body of evidence and identified patterns of human rights violations.

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NPR's Back Seat Book Club
1:23 pm
Tue November 29, 2011

Kids' Book Club Takes 'Tollbooth' To Lands Beyond

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:14 am

Welcome to the second installment of NPR's Backseat Book Club! Every month, we invite kids to read a book along with us, and then send in their questions for the author.

Our book club selection for November is a classic that's celebrating a big anniversary. The Phantom Tollbooth — written by Norton Juster and illustrated by Jules Feiffer — was published 50 years ago. Juster tells NPR's Michele Norris that the story sprang from his own childhood.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Tue November 29, 2011

Will Sanctions Help Syrians?

A package of tough new economic sanctions imposed this week by the Arab League is another blow to the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. But will international pressure really help the people of Syria? Melissa Block talks with Kimberly Ann Elliott, a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. Elliott co-authored a case study on sanctions against Syria that was published by the Peterson Institute.

Business
1:00 pm
Tue November 29, 2011

American Airline's Parent Company Files For Bankruptcy

American Airline's parent company AMR has filed for bankruptcy protection. American will continue to operate its flights as usual. The airline will use bankruptcy to off-load some of the debt that is weighing it down.

Presidential Race
4:26 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

Atlanta Woman Accuses Cain Of Affair

An Atlanta woman has told a local TV station that she had a 13-year-long sexual relationship with GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain. For several weeks now, Cain's campaign has been dogged by several accusations of sexual harassment. Melissa Block talks with NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea.

Technology
1:00 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

Some Oppose New Smart Electric Meters

Smart electric meters are being installed in homes across the country. The wireless devices replace old meters and transmit electricity usage data wirelessly to utilities. But there are concerns about accuracy and safety. Guy Raz talks to David Baker, energy reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle, for more.

Analysis
1:00 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

No Major Violence During Egyptian Elections

Egyptian voters in Cairo, Alexandria and several other major cities are voting Monday in the first stage of the country's parliamentary election. Turn out is heavy and so far there has been no major violence. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

Sports
1:00 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

A Look At The Cult Of Tim Tebow

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 4:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And I'm Guy Raz.

Another win for Tim Tebow.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTBALL GAME)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Watch this. Tebow throws. Touchdown, Broncos. Eric Decker wide open and Tebow with a strike to put Denver right back in it.

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Presidential Race
1:00 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

DNC Launches Romney Attack Ad In Key States

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 4:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

There's a new political ad out today from the Democratic National Committee. It highlights what Democrats consider Mitt Romney's greatest weakness: his inconsistency. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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Music Interviews
11:12 am
Mon November 28, 2011

'Moves Like Jagger': The Making Of Maroon 5's Mega-Hit

Adam Levine (center) and the rest of Maroon 5.
Matt Beard

The song "Moves Like Jagger" has been on the Billboard Hot 100 for five months — it peaked at No. 1 and is still holding on at No. 5. The band behind the song is Maroon 5, led by singer and songwriter Adam Levine, who also works as a coach on the TV singing competition The Voice.

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Politics
3:00 am
Mon November 28, 2011

Obama Office Alters More Federal Rules Than Bush

Cass Sunstein is the director of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. A new study finds that the office has altered more federal regulations under President Obama than it did under George W. Bush.
AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 4:26 pm

Tucked away in a corner of the White House's Old Executive Office Building, an office that most people have never heard of affects millions of Americans' lives. It's the last hurdle that every proposed regulation must surmount before seeing the light of day. And a new study of this obscure part of the government suggests that President Obama is altering more of those regulations than President George W. Bush did.

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NPR Story
3:33 pm
Sun November 27, 2011

World Playlist: What's Hot In Hong Kong And Dakar?

Whether you want to or not, you've probably heard the songs on the top-100 list in the U.S. But do you know what's hot right now in West Africa or China? Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rachel Martin finds out what music is popular in Hong Kong and Dakar by talking to music critics Ben Sin and Rose Skelton. They each pick three favorite songs that best represent the music scene in their cities.

Music Lists
2:32 pm
Sun November 27, 2011

Chart Hits From Hong Kong And Senegal

Hong Kong cantopop star Kay Tse performs in 2009.
Lai Seng Sin AP

Originally published on Sun November 27, 2011 8:48 pm

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Movies
1:00 pm
Sun November 27, 2011

Praise Puts 'Tyrannosaur' Filmmaker In The Spotlight

Writer-director Paddy Considine's debut film, Tyrannosaur, is a favorite of critics this year. It's generating Oscar buzz and has earned Sundance Festival awards for Considine's directing and the film's lead actors. the film tackles dark themes like death and spousal abuse, but a message of hope manages to shine through. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rachel Martin talks to Paddy Considine about writing and directing the film, which is in theaters now.

World
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Alleged NATO Attack Strains U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Pakistan says 25 of its soldiers were killed in a NATO helicopter attack on a checkpoint at the Afghan border. NATO says it is investigating what happened. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Quil Lawrence about the incident, which has further exacerbated U.S.-Pakistan tensions.

Analysis
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Week In News: Pakistan Rift, Egypt Protests, GOP Debate

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:05 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

With more on this story and the rest of the week's news, we're joined now by Doyle McManus. He's the Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, and he has graciously agreed to stand in for our regular news analyst, James Fallows. Doyle, thanks so much for being with us.

DOYLE MCMANUS: Thank you for having me.

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Space
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Cruising To Mars: The Rover's Tasks

NASA launched the Mars Science Laboratory from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Saturday. The MSL is five times heavier than the rovers currently on Mars and has twice as many scientific instruments. It will take nine months for the spacecraft to reach the Red Planet, and there's plenty of things for it to do before then.

The Impact of War
1:00 pm
Sat November 26, 2011

Marine's Life Forever Altered By War

Andrew Robinson was injured by a roadside bomb during his second deployment to Iraq. Now a quadriplegic, he says he is learning how to use his limited mobility and is proud of having protected his fellow soldiers. He is especially motivated because his wife is expecting twins next month.

Author Interviews
11:23 am
Sat November 26, 2011

'Chicks With Guns': A Picture Of Gun-Toting Women

Photographer Lindsay McCrum's new book includes images of women who feel that hunting is a way to bring people and family together. Among those women is Alexandra, who poses for McCrum with her son, Truett, and her Ithaca 20-gauge side-by-side shotgun.
Lindsay McCrum

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:05 pm

If you turn to page 109 of Lindsay McCrum's photo book, you'll see a photo of a woman wearing jeans and a green baseball cap standing in a grassy field. She's looking straight at the camera, clutching a semi-automatic rifle as if it were a water bottle. Standing between her legs is her son, his blond hair peeking out from behind her thigh as he poses with his toy gun, a miniature of his mother's.

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Music
3:30 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

For Pesky Relatives, A CD-Buying Gift Guide

Shabazz Palaces.
David Belisle and Leif Podhajsky

When Rachel Martin was given a slot guest-hosting weekends at All Things Considered, she took the opportunity to get a little holiday shopping out of the way. Needing musical stocking-stuffers for a few pesky relatives — her fiance's mom, for example, or her dad, who likes "Tchaikovsky and Johnny Cash" — she consulted NPR Music's Stephen Thompson, and asked him for some tips.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Political Protests In Egypt Intensify, Expand

Egypt's military rulers named a former prime minister under Hosni Mubarak to head the new government. The move is likely to further incite the tens of thousands of protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square, demanding the resignation of the ruling military council. And for the first time, pro-military protesters gathered in another of Cairo's squares.

NPR Story
2:21 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Court Ruling Could Alter Marine Parks Permanently

Last year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited SeaWorld following the death of a killer whale trainer. If a Florida court rules in favor of OSHA, employees of SeaWorld and other parks like it will no longer be able to come into direct contact with whales unless there is a barrier between them. Guy Raz speaks to Tim Zimmermann, a correspondent for Outside Magazine, about the ongoing legal dispute.

Opinion
2:21 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Letters: A Thanksgiving Tale

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 2:55 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. And now it's time for your letters - all about our annual Thanksgiving Day story by writer Bailey White. This year, Bailey told us about a Florida painter who moved to Vermont, where he has trouble fitting in. At a neighbor's suggestion, he turns to raising turkeys.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 25, 2011

Week In Politics: Taking The Country's Pulse

Guy Raz talks with our weekly commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times, about Congress' tough spot, observations on the political divide, economic mobility and disagreement over core values.

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