Features

Wyoming Music Festivals: Summer 2017

May 8, 2017
Grand Targhee Resort

Brace yourselves, Wyoming. Summer is coming. Plan your music schedule now!

This festival season, take a photo of you (and your friends) at a Wyoming music festival, use the hashtag #wyofest and post it to Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. 

 

Jennifer Tennican

Vertical Harvest is finishing up its first year of operation. The hydroponic, or soil-less, greenhouse is located in downtown Jackson, and not only provides locally grown produce, but also employs 15 people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

Clay Landry

The era of the mountain man was brief—the high point of the Rocky Mountain beaver fur trade was between 1820 and 1840. But the period still holds fascination today. Clay Landry has written extensively on the subject.

He’ll be speaking on non-fiction writing at the Wyoming Writers Conference June 2-4 in Gillette. As Landry told Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer, he recently served as a historical advisor for the 2016 film The Revenant.

uwyo.edu

Doomed love is the theme of this week’s University of Wyoming Symphony Orchestra 2016-17 season finale. It includes Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet, as well as works by four other composers, including recent UW eminent composer in residence, Libby Larsen.

Studio Sessions: Jalan Crossland

May 3, 2017
Jalan Crossland

Jalan Crossland, considered a "Wyoming treasure," is widely acclaimed by audiences, critics, and his musical peers as being a premier acoustic guitarist, as well as a banjo player, singer-songwriter, and engaging showman. 

Here are two of his songs off of his new album Singalongs for the Apocalypse, shot on stage at Laramie's Gryphon Theatre.

Singer-Songwriter James Reed On Wyoming Sounds

May 1, 2017
Wyoming Public Media

Singer-songwriter James Reed played live Friday April 28 on Wyoming Sounds and visited with Grady Kirkpatrick. James is a freshman attending the University of Wyoming and is originally from Ft. Collins. He has been playing guitar for about nine years and plans to attend the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston beginning in the spring of 2018.

Studio Sessions: Elk Tongue

Apr 25, 2017
BHP Imaging, copyright 2016

Named after a body part of the North American mammal, Wyoming’s Elk Tongue performs psychedelic desert rock. All four band members are from various musical backgrounds, which they blend together to create sounds reminiscent of the past with an eye (and an ear) to the future.

Contemporary Flute Player And Composer Robert Dick

Apr 24, 2017
Malcolm Pollock

American flute player and composer Robert Dick live on 4/24/17 during Wyoming Public Radio's Wyoming Sounds.

Timothy Egan

National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winner Timothy Egan’s newest book The Immortal Irishman, tells the story of Irish revolutionary Thomas Francis Meagher and how he changed the course of history in Ireland, Australia, and the United States. Egan will be coming to the University of Wyoming campus in Laramie Tuesday, April 18 to give a talk on his book. He spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard, and said he first discovered Meagher’s story on a visit to Montana.

Twitter

National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winner Timothy Egan will give a presentation at the University of Wyoming Tuesday on his newest book.

The Immortal Irishman tells the story of 19th century Irish orator and revolutionary Thomas Francis Meagher, whose speeches moved people to action in Ireland, Australia, and the United States. Meagher eventually became territorial governor of Montana before he disappeared.

Egan said he wrote the book partly because he became more interested in his own Irish heritage.

Studio Sessions: Paul Cauthen

Apr 11, 2017
Paul Cauthen

Paul Cauthen is a country artist whose raw virtuosity has Rolling Stone calling him, "A triple-barreled blast of Texas country, soul and holy-roller rockabilly, delivered by a big-voiced crooner." Paul Cauthen was a part of the band from Sons of Fathers and created his first solo album "My Gospel" in Austin, Texas. 

Studio Sessions: Sally & George

Apr 11, 2017
Courtesy of the artist

Shelby "Sally" Means and Joel "George" Timmons first met back in 2012, when Timmons' Americana band, Sol Driven Train, and Means' bluegrass band, Della Mae, were playing the same festival. They eventually developed both a romantic partnership and a musical one, adopting the given names of Means' late grandparents.

Kunio Yamamoto facing Heart Mountain, 1944.” George and Frank C. Hirahara Photograph Collection, 1932-2016 (SC14). Courtesy Manuscripts, Archives & Special Collections,Washington State University, Pullman.

This year is the 75th anniversary of the executive order that lead to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.

To mark the occasion, the University Of Wyoming College Of Law is hosting Heart Mountain Week – a week of programming that explores what can be learned from this chapter in American History. Director of the International Human Rights Clinic and Assistant Professor of Law Suzie Pritchett joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to talk about Heart Mountain Week.

 

Melodie Edwards

The controversial play “What Would Crazyhorse Do?” recently made its national debut in Laramie, of all places. Playwright and Lakota member Larissa Fasthorse said the script is her most widely read but no other theaters have actually performed it until now. She said that had a lot to do with the play's subject matter.

Racial purity.

Early in the play, after grieving the death of their grandfather, twins Calvin and Journey got a knock on their door.

“We don’t want any more funeral food!” shouted Journey.

Threshold Episode 07: Oh Give Me A Home

Apr 2, 2017
AMY MARTIN

In the final episode of Threshold season 01, listeners will encounter pearls of wisdom from youth who have grown up with bison in their midst, and take a trip to the Oakland Zoo, which will soon receive buffalo from the Blackfeet tribe that will help jumpstart a conservation herd there. We also conjure the big ideas driving this first season - what's our future with this animal? How does that connect with our history? Can America ever have wild, free-roaming bison again?

Special Threshold Wyoming Episode: The Human-Bison Connection

Apr 2, 2017
AMY MARTIN - AURICLE PRODUCTIONS

On this special episode produced just for Wyoming Public Radio listeners, we travel back in time 150,000 years to trace the human-bison connection. We'll also hear bison stories from listeners. 

Each season, Threshold podcast explores one story from the natural world, and what it says about us. Season one focuses on the American bison. Dig into the history of the American bison, from their arrival in North America to current controversies surrounding their management today. 

Val Burgess

 

Sheridan resident Val Burgess has put a lot of miles on her car speaking to school children and others about the experiences of World War II vets and prisoners of war. Burgess is finishing up another round of talks next month and will be speaking in Northeast Wyoming next week. She tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck about her interest in the subject.

Anna Rader

Psychedelic rock band Elk Tongue live on 3/31/17 on during Wyoming Public Radio's Wyoming Sounds.

Relative Theatrics

A Laramie theater troupe will offer the first ever performance of the play, “What Would Crazyhorse Do?” by Lakota playwright Larissa Fasthorse on March 30, 31, April 1 and April 6, 7 and 8.

It’s the story of a set of twins, the last two remaining members of a fictitious tribe, who are approached by the Ku Klux Klan to collaborate on preserving racial identity. Fasthorse said she was impressed that Laramie’s Relative Theatrics was brave enough to tackle such a controversial topic when, for five years, no other troupe would.

Threshold Episode 06: Territory Folks Should All Be Pals

Mar 26, 2017
Amy Martin

  

Visit the American Prairie Reserve, a conservation project in the heart of Montana that could eventually be home to 10,000 bison. The vision is to stitch together 3.5 million acres of public and private lands to form the largest wildlife park in the lower 48. But some nearby ranchers feel the push to build the APR is pushing them off their land, and they're mounting a resistance. We also try to solve the Great Elk Mystery: why are elk that have been exposed to brucellosis allowed to roam free in Montana, while bison are not?

Threshold Episode 05: Heirs To The Most Glorious Heritage

Mar 26, 2017
Amy Martin

  

In 1908, the National Bison Range was created by carving 18,000 acres out of Montana's Flathead Reservation. Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it is willing to transfer the land back to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. But, a lawsuit has been filed to stop the proposed transfer. In this episode, we meet tribal members who feel they are the rightful stewards of the land and the historic bison herd, and others who are trying to stop the transfer.

Rebecca Huntington

President Donald Trump’s first federal budget plan proposes a complete defunding of both the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The potential eliminations could hurt many arts organizations across the state.

Threshold Episode 04: Tatanka Oyate

Mar 12, 2017

In episode four of Threshold, we meet Robbie Magnan of the Fort Peck Tribes. He believes his community can prosper in the future by reconnecting with their roots as the Tatanka Oyate — the buffalo people. Magnan has built a quarantine facility that could be an alternative to the Yellowstone bison slaughter, but right now it sits empty while more than a thousand bison are being culled from the herd. Why? We'll learn more about Magnan's vision for bison restoration, and investigate why some people are opposed to it.

Threshold Episode 03: Born Free

Mar 12, 2017
Amy Martin

Many cattle ranchers view wild bison as a threat to their livelihoods. But some think cattle and bison can coexist. On episode three of Threshold, you'll meet two cattle ranchers with different perspectives on wild bison — and, we'll take you on a controversial bison hunt.

Each season, Threshold podcast explores one story from the natural world, and what it says about us. Season one focuses on the American bison. Dig into the history of the American bison, from their arrival in North America, to current controversies surrounding their management today. 

Bridget Kearney

    

Lake Street Dive is playing in Laramie Saturday night March 11 at the Gryphon Theatre. Grady Kirkpatrick recently spoke with band member Bridget Kearney about how they formed and about her debut solo album Won't Let You Down.

 

 

 

Threshold Episode 02: 'The Red Man Was Pressed'

Mar 5, 2017

How did we go from more than 50 million wild bison to just 23 free-roaming animals? And how does the decimation of the herds relate to the oppression of Native Americans? Find out on this episode of Threshold.

Threshold Episode 01: For The Benefit And Enjoyment Of The People

Mar 5, 2017
AMY MARTIN

Yellowstone National Park is where we saved the American bison from extinction. But each year, we slaughter hundreds of animals from this prized herd. Why? Find out now on the first episode of Threshold.

Each season, Threshold podcast explores one story from the natural world, and what it says about us. Season one focuses on the American bison. Dig into the history of the American bison, from their arrival in North America, to current controversies surrounding their management today. 

The Faces From The Land

Photographs of Native Americans in full powwow regalia and make up will appear at an art opening in Buffalo tonight. Photographer Ben Marra said he started his career doing portraits, and so it came naturally to him to present powwow dancers with that kind of controlled lighting.

“I felt comfortable that way and it gave me more control,” Marra said. “And now we have probably the largest present day collection of this type of photographs in the world.”

Traditional Irish Music Band Danú Live On Wyoming Sounds

Mar 3, 2017
Anna Rader

Traditional Irish music band Danú live on 3/3/17 during Wyoming Public Radio's Wyoming Sounds.

thebeardedladyproject.com

A University of Wyoming scientist has created a documentary to celebrate women in paleontology.

Ellen Currano said she and a friend, filmmaker Lexi Jameison Marsh, conceived of the project after a hard day in their separate fields. Both women had felt like outsiders who were not taken as seriously as their male colleagues.

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