Jazz and classical students and faculty musicians from the University of Wyoming’s Music Department are performing together Monday, October 5 at the Buchanan Center for the Performing Arts. The concert features new compositions and new arrangements by pianist and faculty member Ben Markley—who will be joined on stage by 15 violinists, violists, and cellists. Markley previewed the concert with Wyoming Public Radio's Micah Schweizer.

Singer-Songwriter Justin Townes Earle On Morning Music

Sep 30, 2015

Justin Townes Earle recorded live on 9/30/15 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.  

Miles Bryan

Many of us begin our day by watching the garage door open.

It’s creaking sound usually doesn’t mean anything special: time for another morning commute, or maybe some yard work if it’s the weekend. But for Jack Schulte, the sound of the garage door opening inspires brings up far less mundane feelings.

“It makes me ready,” he says. “To break the surly bonds of gravity.”

Michael Coles for winterinthebloodfilm.com

On Thursday, an award-winning film based on a classic James Welch novel makes its Wyoming debut. Winter in the Blood follows the story of a Blackfoot man, Virgil First Raise, through his journey of self-discovery. The movie is directed by brothers Alex and Andrew Smith.

Native Americana Blues Guitarist Cary Morin On Morning Music

Sep 22, 2015
Mike Vanata

Cary Morin recorded live on 9/22/15 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

North Carolina Folk Duo Lowland Hum On Morning Music

Sep 21, 2015
Lowland Hum



The Wyoming Symphony Orchestra has a new home for the 2015-2016 concert season. The orchestra is performing at Casper College instead of its usual hall at Natrona County High School while the auditorium is under renovation. Music director Matthew Savery says playing at Wheeler Concert Hall offers new acoustic possibilities.


Over the next week, a piece of music inspired by Wyoming is touring the state. "A Rambling Stretch" is the work of composer Tyler Gilmore. As Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer discovered, the piece of music draws together the many strands of Gilmore’s life.

Here's the tour schedule:


Artists are invading downtown Laramie this weekend. Local artists of all kinds will “pop up” in local businesses and on the streets for the Laramie Pop-Up Artwalk.

It’s a creation of the Wyoming Art Party, the Wyoming Arts Council, and the Downtown Laramie Business Alliance. 26 artists, including street performers and buskers, are scheduled. Local artist Adrienne Vetter has extended an invitation for any artist who would like to join at the event.

Riot Act, Inc.

The next big name in sketch comedy could have its roots in Wyoming.

This Saturday, September 19, the Jackson-based theatre company Riot Act, Inc. will hold a sketch comedy workshop with hopes that participants will go on to form a comedy troupe of their own. The workshop is open to all levels of writers and actors.

Jenny Booth Art

Fashion shows in major cities aren’t the only places that define style. Right now, the 23rd annual Western Design Conference is in full swing in Jackson. The juried show features the work of more than 100 artists from around the country—including many from Wyoming. Director Allison Merritt spoke to Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer about what the event brings to the world of design.

Art Association of Jackson Hole

Nine up-and-coming Jackson artists will be featured in the fourth annual Jackson Rising exhibition opening this weekend. Local artists recommended their peers for the Jackson Rising display. Art Association Gallery director Thomas Macker says this process of finding new contributors keeps the exhibition fresh year after year.

Americana Band The Black Lillies On Morning Music

Sep 9, 2015
Sprouse Neuhoff Photography



The Black Lillies recorded live on 9/9/15 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.

Anna Rader

Singer-songwriter and blues violinist Anne Harris, who hails from Chicago, played live on Morning Music along with Wyoming blues guitar great Taylor Scott. They blew us away with their talent and great live performances. See them play at the Snowy Range Music Festival, happening this weekend. 

University of Wyoming Cultural Programs


Late next month the fall 2015 season of Cultural Programs at the University of Wyoming will get underway with a September 29th performance of Huun Huur Tu, Tuvan throat singers. It’s an extremely diverse schedule that wraps up in April. University of Wyoming Director of Cultural Programs and Director of Fine Arts Outreach Janelle Fletcher told Bob Beck that they are doing some new things.  

Wyoming Public Media

Michael Martin Murphey (of "Wildfire" and "Carolina In the Pines" fame) talked with Grady Kirkpatrick and played a few songs.

Melodie Edwards

There’s a long tradition of what’s called plein aire art in the West. That’s when an artist paints right there in the great outdoors. But for 40 years, one Laramie artist has taken this technique to new heights…literally. You could almost call his work thin air painting. Joe Arnold has painted from the tops of some of the world’s most majestic mountains. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards decided to scale a Wyoming mountain with Arnold to see it through his eyes.

Miles Bryan


H+S Coffee Head Roaster Coulter Sunderman has some advice for how you should consume your morning cup of coffee: remember to slurp.

“You want to slurp,” Sunderman says before a coffee tasting at H+S’s space in downtown Laramie. “It aerates the coffee across your tongue.”

The tasting would be familiar to anyone who's been to a wine tasting: the gathered coffee fans sample six unmarked cups, and toss out tasting notes like “cashew,” “peanut butter,” and “cola.”

Studio Sessions: One Ton Pig

Aug 21, 2015
One Ton Pig

Jackson, Wyoming’s own alt-country band One Ton Pig melds the singer-songwriter tradition of artists like Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson with genre-bending jam-band styles. Recorded during a recent visit to the Wyoming Public Radio studios, the band treats us to new songs from their fourth album, Lastville. 

Just A Word

Mr. Mr. 

Wikipedia Commons

The Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company is in Jackson this week, holding master classes and performing the new work “Analogy/Dora: Tramontane” this weekend.

The piece combines spoken word and modern dance and meditates on memory and duty. It’s based on the stories of Dora Amelan , a French-Jewish nurse who survived World War Two. Bill T. Jones, a two-time tony winner and former Macarthur Genius grant recipient, is the choreographer and artistic director. He joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard from Jackson.

Paul B. Goode / newyorklivearts.org

The Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company is in residence with the Dancer's Workshop at the Jackson Hole Center for the Arts this week, holding master classes and performing its new work “Analogy/Dora: Tramontane.”

Heather James Fine Art

A Jackson gallery is bringing museum-grade art to Wyoming. The Heather James Fine Art gallery in Jackson has a number of well-known pieces in its collection this summer, including pieces from Picasso and Warhol as well as Dalí and Matisse.

Gallery director Colleen Fitzgerald says art like this can be unexpected in small town Wyoming, as she learned two summers ago at a similar exhibition with pieces by Claude Monet.

“People would come in and just walk around a corner where they were and just stop in their tracks. They weren’t expecting at all to see that,” she says.

Melodie Edwards

For women, it’s never been easy breaking into male-dominated fields. That was the case for Susan Marsh. She’s the author of a new book called A Hunger For High Country. It’s a memoir about how her childhood love for nature led her to become a landscape architect for the U.S. Forest Service. Marsh is now retired and writing a natural history of Jackson’s Cache Creek. On a wildflower walk along the creek with Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards, she talked about her years of struggle during a time when the Forest Service hired very few women.

David Swift

The Jackson Hole community is invited to collaborate with artists on a new piece of public art. Materials are being gathered from different protected lands around Jackson to form a sculpture. Jackson Hole Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews says the project is called FoundSpace.

“The idea behind FoundSpace is really reaching out to people to connect to finding space, finding space via time, finding space out in nature, finding space in the open spaces. And really also, the treasures that we have that connect us to those spaces.”

Aaron Schrank

Ryan Reed loves rodeo. And each July, he makes a pilgrimage here, to the so-called “Daddy of ‘Em All” in Cheyenne.

“You just feel like you’re on hallowed ground when you’re here.” Reed says.

Roaming the Frontier Days midway, this amateur steer wrestler and calf roper is like a kid in a candy store. 

“Yesterday, during the bareback bronc, I actually got some dirt flung on me,” says Reed. “I really felt like I’d been hit by some special dirt or something. That’s just kind of the feeling I have about the place.”

Aaron Schrank

The rodeo may be the best-known competition at Cheyenne Frontier days, but outside the arena there is another group of skilled professionals vying for glory. Carnival games operators leverage years of practice and skill to convince people like you to pay cash for the opportunity to win a push, stuffed prize. For many of them, it's not just a job: it's a way of life. Wyoming Public Radio’s Miles Bryan spent time with a few of these games operators and has this postcard.

Bob Beck

It’s another day at the bull riding event at the Cheyenne Frontier Days rodeo and it’s another day of the rodeo announcer thanking bullfighter Darrell Diefenbach for knocking a bull away from a helpless bull rider who’d fallen to the ground. It’s something Diefenbach and his Frontier Days partner Dusty Tuckness do every day.

Melodie Edwards

When you think of a rodeo star, it’s usually a guy on a bucking horse, not a woman. But there is one age-old rodeo event that was developed especially for women: barrel racing. It’s been around since the early 1900’s, but it’s not for wimps. Racers on horseback make loops as fast and tight as they can around three barrels set up in a triangle before heading back to start--and they do it in all in under 18 seconds.

Aaron Schrank

The very name ‘Frontier Days’ is meant to conjure up images of the old West. And that includes Native Americans, who have been a part of Cheyenne Frontier Days pretty much from the beginning. The North Bear Singers and Little Sun Drum and Dance Group, from the Wind River Indian Reservation are the main attraction this year, occupying the arena at the center of the Indian Village.

Caroline Ballard

Cowboys in Levis, bucking broncos, and raging bulls in a dirt arena are probably the images that come to mind when you think of a rodeo. The events aren’t exactly known for their glamour. But at Cheyenne Frontier Days, two of its most recognizable faces are known just as much for their outfits as they are for their riding. Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard finds out what it’s like to be Miss Frontier and her Lady In Waiting.