Features

Caroline Ballard

The art exhibition THE BRIDGE is made up of 47 works of art that are meant to show the commonalities between Muslims, Christians, and Jews. Its goal isn’t just interfaith dialogue, but interfaith friendship, and this month it has shows in Laramie, Rock Springs, Lander, and Powell.

Wyoming Art Party

The second annual Pop-Up Artwalk is coming to downtown Laramie this month. The event, organized by the Wyoming Art Party, will host local artists, musicians, and performers in weekend-long demonstration of creativity and community. People will have the change to explore the different "pop-up" spaces inside local businesses and take part in activities throughout the event.

The Wyoming Art Party is run by local artists June Glasson, Adrienne Vetter, and Meg Thompson.

Penny Preston

While the National Park Service celebrated its 100th year of existence recently, the beloved federal agency is trying to figure out how to make it through the next century, while protecting the national parks “unimpaired for future generations”. Some people are concerned new funding sources may put corporate logos in the parks.

144 years after Yellowstone National Park was established, people from around the world still gasp and cheer when Old Faithful erupts.

Maggie Mullen

Fighting wildfires increasingly relies on new technology, like drones and a web program that traces every lightning strike in real time. But in the Black Hills of Northeastern Wyoming, the most basic technology is still relied on—the human eye.

Warren Peak Lookout Tower is six miles Northwest of Sundance. It’s at 6,710 feet and it’s breezy. Karen Maloy is the lookout for Warren Peak. It’s her 11th season. She’s worked at towers across the country. Her first assignment was in college.

University of Wyoming

 

The University of Wyoming is beginning another school year, and with it comes a new season of visiting performers through the school’s Cultural Programs. Janelle Fletcher is the Director of Fine Arts Outreach & Cultural Programs, and she joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to preview some of the fall season acts.

Michael Polito Source: Wikimedia Commons

  

The community of Gillette has seen tension recently with plans for a Quran burning and protests over Gillette’s first mosque. Writer and Pulitzer Prize winner Kathryn Schulz heard this and wondered how a Muslim community came to be in coal mining Wyoming.

Caroline Ballard

  

Nearly 150 years ago, Wyoming was the first place in the country to grant women the right to vote. Congress didn't pass the 19th amendment, guaranteeing all American women the right to vote, until 1919, and it was ratified by states in 1920. Wyoming was ahead of its time, giving women the vote in 1869, but there are conflicting accounts as to why the state was a trailblazer.

When The Equal Rights Amendment Came To Utah

Aug 26, 2016
Caroline Ballard

Women are only mentioned in the Constitution once: in the Nineteenth Amendment which grants women the right to vote. In 1923, suffragists proposed an amendment that would protect women’s rights across the board, but when the vote came to Utah, it was blocked by the Mormon Church.

Phillip Breker PhotoRX

After years of working as a chef in ethnic restaurants, Sioux tribal member Sean Sherman had an “ah-ha” moment. He suddenly wondered why there were no Native American restaurants, especially since pre-European contact foods are uniquely healthy. Now, Sherman is raising money through a Kickstarter Campaign to open one and he’s calling it The Sioux Chef.

Cassidy Newkirk

The Arizona Final Salute Foundation has commissioned a University of Wyoming student to create a painting of the USS Arizona for the 75th anniversary of its sinking at Pearl Harbor. Cassidy Newkirk received the commission last October 17, 100 years to the day after the USS Arizona itself was commissioned.

Jackson is renowned for its dramatic landscapes and outdoor recreation, but arts organizations would like Jackson to be just as well known for its world-class cultural offerings. For the first time, Dancers’ Workshop and the Grand Teton Music Festival are teaming up to cross-promote each other’s events.

“For our two organizations it just made good sense to work together and to do our part to hopefully raise the profile of the community through what we’re already doing,” explained GTMF executive director Andrew Todd.

thebrintonmuseum.org

  

There’s an old joke from the movie The Blues Brothers:  “What kind of music do you usually have here?” asks Elwood. “Oh, we got both kinds,” answers the bartender. “We got Country and Western!”

 

patandvictor.com

The official video for Pat + Victor's song, "Wyoming." Written by Victor Pokorny. Listen to Pat + Victor's entire "Stay! Positive!" EP starting Aug. 23, 2016 on iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud, Google Play and other streaming and purchase sites. 

Nigel Bland

An unusual concert is coming to the Lander Bar on Friday, August 12. Instead of 80’s rock and whiskey shots, it’s 'Bach and Beer.' The program is part a of tour that brings classical music to informal places, like bars and coffee shops.

Caroline Ballard

This week, the New American Economy issued a report on the economic impact of immigrants in every state, highlighting the role immigrants play as entrepreneurs. One place where immigrants are starting new companies in Wyoming is the Wyoming Technology Business Center – a business incubator for start-ups.

Ortegon

  

This week the University of Wyoming hosted a summer institute for an organization that supports women of color in academia. One of the guest speakers was Sarah Ortegon, artist and former Miss Native American USA. Wyoming Public Radio’s Maggie Mullen spoke with Ortegon about her paintings currently exhibited at the UW Art Museum, partly inspired by her childhood on the Wind River Reservation. Her work will be exhibited until September 2.

Caroline Ballard

  

The Cathedral Home for Children just north of Laramie is a boarding school for teens that have had traumatic experiences. Besides providing a safe space, the home helps the kids deal with their emotions. This summer they’re trying something new – drumming circles.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Thanks to innovations in camera technology, wildlife biologists are now able to peek into the lives of animals like never before. Now, a new book called Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature, compiles the best camera trap photos from around the world. Wyoming Public Radio's Melodie Edwards talked with author, Roland Hayes, head of the Biodiversity Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and Professor at North Carolina State University. Hayes starts the conversation by explaining just what a camera trap is.

The Brinton Museum

Big Horn, Wyoming will play host to the first Bighorn Rendezvous Art Show and Sale this weekend. The event is the outgrowth of a long-running art show in Helena, Montana run by the Northwest Rendezvous Group of Artists. That show ended in 2012. Now, the Brinton Museum in Big Horn will play host to event’s new incarnation.

Bob Beck

Bob Jensen has spent most of his time in Wyoming thinking about improving the economy. For ten years he led the Wyoming Business Council, the state’s economic development arm. Several months ago during a meeting of some Cheyenne entrepreneurs the idea of developing a coding school was pitched. And that discussion led to the development of Array, School of Technology and Design in downtown Cheyenne.

“It is a grassroots effort to try and effect workforce quickly for a growing tech industry in Wyoming,” said Jensen.

Rick Edwards (AMNH)

Wyoming looked pretty different 50 million years ago. It was tropical, with lots of trees and wet, humid conditions. Scientists know this because of the many fossils found from this time period in the Green River Formation in Southwest Wyoming.

whatfest.com

This Friday and Saturday, the little town of Riverside, Wyoming will see its population balloon from 50 to 1500. WHAT Fest has seen steady growth since moving to Riverside from Cody, five years ago.

This year’s music festival features more than 30 bands, mostly from around Wyoming. But there are also bands from Colorado and several national touring acts performing this weekend, including The Black Lillies and The Lonesome Heroes.

Will and Jim Pattiz / More Than Just Parks

The National Park Service is celebrating its centennial this year, and already 2016 is on track to break records for the number of visitors at national parks in Wyoming. But if you can’t make it to a national park this summer, there’s a new way to see one right from your computer or smartphone.

More Than Just Parks is a project by brothers Will and Jim Pattiz, who have set out to document every national park with its own short film. Each video is a few minutes long and features time lapse photography of landscapes and wildlife.

William Henry Jackson/Bradly J. Boner

As the National Park Service celebrates 100 years, a photographer says Yellowstone National Park is succeeding at preserving its wild landscape.

Bradly Boner spent three summers in Yellowstone re-photographing more than a hundred photos taken in 1871. The original shots are from a survey expedition to what would become Yellowstone National Park. And Boner says nearly a century and a half later, the landscape remains remarkably intact.

Atlanta Blues Rock Band Dr. Izzy On Morning Music

Jul 22, 2016
Dr. Izzy Band

Dr. Izzy Band recorded live on 7/22/16 during Wyoming Public Radio's Morning Music show.  

donaldrunnicles.org

This summer, the Grand Teton Music Festival celebrates 10 years with music director and conductor Donald Runnicles. As he tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer, the festival features a lineup of rising young stars as guest soloists with the orchestra.

Wyoming Public Radio’s first broadcast of the Festival Orchestra is tonight, immediately following coverage of the Republican National Convention.

gargene.com

  

On Tuesday, Governor Matt Mead named Eugene Gagliano the 8th poet laureate of Wyoming. Gagliano is a retired elementary school teacher and is known for his collaborative and entertaining presentations for schools and libraries across the state. Wyoming Public Radio’s Maggie Mullen spoke with him about the honor.

David Swift

 

When someone gets sick, it can be difficult to know what to do for them. Should you bring flowers, food, a card? Jackson resident Kathleen Neiley is providing an answer to that question and employing rural women around the state with her new business Full Circle.

Quilts. The company creates custom, group funded t-shirt quilts for cancer patients, and its workforce will be made up of women in rural areas of Wyoming. Neiley told Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard the idea came from her own experiences.

HumaNature Broadcast Special #2

Jul 8, 2016
Meg Thompson

A special edition of HumaNature formatted for air: a man utters a curse that comes true, a stint at a dinosaur quarry challenges a woman’s scientific certainty, a woman runs across the country alone and finds the good in others along the way, and a river guide’s first river trip goes horribly, hilariously wrong. 

Story 1: Man vs. Machine

Vertical Harvest

A documentary following the first year of business for an innovative greenhouse in Jackson is one of ten finalists in a nationwide film competition.

The film, called “Hearts of Glass,” details the challenges of the Vertical Harvest greenhouse through its first year of “vertical farming,” a process that grows produce by stacking it on top of each other instead of side by side. Vertical Harvest also hires disabled people in the community to help grow the produce.

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