Features

Jackson tourism officials are expecting a busy New Year’s holiday. 

The lodging barometer, which measures lodging bookings for the valley shows occupancy at 72-percent of full for the Saturday before New Year’s.  That’s up significantly from last year’s 59-percent and the 49-percent that was recorded in 2010.

Kate Foster of the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce says the turnaround is based on a couple of things.

At the end of the month, Susan Simpson will retire from her post as Albany County Librarian. Simpson has worked in the state for more than three decades, and she says she’s proud of the Wyoming library system’s cooperative network.

“I was on a bus in Boston Massachusetts at a conference and I had my name tag on, and woman said to me, ‘Oh, you’re from Wyoming! I wish we did what you did!’ And I don’t remember where she was from, but it’s a very common response.”

Hub Whitt

Wyoming is still a frontier of sorts, a place where many continue to hunt in wide open spaces. And sometimes they sing about it, too. Wyoming Public Radio’s Irina Zhorov reports that Julian Saporiti is collecting those cowboy poets’ songs to share with others.

ZHOROV: Julian Saporiti is not from Wyoming…

JULIAN SAPORITI: Like this how not-Wyoming or Western I am. I’ve never ridden a horse in my life. I’ve been on a pony ride going around in a circle in a grocery store parking lot when I was 6. That’s the extent of my cowboyisms.

Sara Hossaini

A Wyoming Archaeologist’s work in Mongolia is shedding new light on the prehistoric people of the Rocky

Mountains. Wyoming Public Radio’s Sara Hossaini reports.

SARA HOSSAINI: University of Wyoming archaeologist Todd Surovell spends a lot of time thinking about how humans organize the space around us. In particular, our junk.

TODD SUROVELL: I don’t think archaeologists commonly portray themselves as studiers of trash, but that’s what we do. Ninety-nine percent of what we find in the archaeological record is refuse.

We’re joined now by author Steve Horn. He lives between Laramie and Cheyenne, and earlier this year he published a novel called “Another Man’s Life.” The book tells the story of a Vietnam veteran from Wyoming after he returns home from the war. So Steve, without giving too much away, tell us about the story.

“The Hitching Post Inn: Wyoming’s Second Capital” is the story about an iconic hotel in Cheyenne that was home to legislators, lobbyists and others over the years.  That includes big name entertainers.  The main portion of the facility burned to the ground in 2010.  Sue Castaneda is the author and she says it was more than just a hotel.

Rebecca Martinez

Now we’ll play the first installation of a segment we’re calling “Upstarts”. It’s an occasional series where we profile Wyoming entrepreneurs and explore what makes them – and their businesses – tick. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez spoke with 38-year-old Nathan Heineke, owner of N.L. Heineke Incorporated, where he designs and builds upscale custom hunting rifles in Laramie. He started his business eight years ago, and business is good but, he says it could be a while before he starts to see a profit.

Country, bluegrass and southern rock group the Teka Brock Band, formed in 2008 and are currently living in Sheridan. They are venturing on tour to promote their newest album 307. Anna Rader produced this profile.

Wyoming Whiskey: Retailers buy up first batch in 4 minutes

Nov 28, 2012
Wyoming Whiskey

After four years aging in barrels, the first batch of Wyoming Whiskey sold out to distributors in only four minutes today.


Three-thousand cases of Wyoming Whiskey went on sale to state liquor license holders at 3:00 p.m. on the Wyoming Department of Revenue’s E-Liquor website. At 3:04, the website crashed because it experienced such heavy traffic. Of the state’s 1,250 retailers, only about 75 were able to purchase the whiskey.

Rebecca Martinez

Curling has developed a competitive following in Laramie in recent years… but the age-old winter sport has developed a softer, sillier side once a year to benefit local charities. Wyoming Public Radio’s Senior Poultry correspondent Rebecca Martinez attended the town’s annual Turkey Curling tournament last weekend and filed this postcard.

 

REBECCA MARTINEZ: Turkey curling is ridiculous, in a really fun way.

(Ambi: “Yeah, baby!”) (Ambi: Curling sounds)

Poem: “Devils Tower”

Nov 16, 2012

University of Wyoming PhD student, budding ecologist and writer Kristen Gunther reads her poem, “Devils  Tower.”

Architectural Design Students at the University of Wyoming are helping to re-design Buffalo, Wyoming’s historic downtown. The focal point will be an antique carousel with a unique local flair. 

Roots-rock band Patti Fiasco is based in Ft. Collins but members are from towns across Wyoming. Fronted by Alysia Kraft from Encampment, they combine classic country, soul, and rock 'n' roll. With their self-titled debut release and a growing fan base, there is no limit to Patti Fiasco's potential. Anna Rader produced this profile.

The Wyoming Symphony Orchestra in Casper kicks off the season with a concert on Saturday.

Music Director Matthew Savery says they’ll be playing Paul Hindeman’s Symphonic Metamorphosis and a piece by an American composer named James Beckel, called Toccata for Orchestra.

“Both pieces are similar in that they’re really like concertos for orchestra – they really show of the virtuosic capabilities of an orchestra,” Savery said.

Later in the season, the orchestra will be collaborating with the Eugene Ballet Company to perform the ballet Swan Lake.

Jackson Hole based Chanman Roots Band, fronted by Peter “Chanman” Chandler, are driven by strong rhythms, horns and a positive vibe. The nine members from the Chanman Roots Band come from across the country and  combine reggae, rock, jazz, and more to their music. The band recorded and released its first CD New Uprising in 2011. Anna Rader produced this profile.

Dr. John, Bobby Rush, and Tommy Castro visit with Wyoming Public Media's Grady Kirkpatrick on Morning Music.

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Wyoming and Ten Sleep based musician, Jalan Crossland has been playing music, touring both as a solo artist and with the Jalan Crossland band, for more than 20 years. He has recently released a new solo album, Portrait of a Fish. Anna Rader produced this profile.

Jackson based band Screen Door Porch, was formed by Seadar Rose and Aaron Davis in 2007. Their newest album Fate and the Fruit, follows up their 2010 self-titled debut. Anna Rader produced this profile.

Jackson based, Americana band One Ton Pig have just released a new self-titled album. Anna Rader produced this profile.

This month a movie will debut featuring an iconic bar in Jackson Hole.  It’s called The Stagecoach Bar: An American Crossroads.  To many in the valley it is more than a bar.  For years it has featured live music on Sunday nights and has been the host to Cowboys and millionaires.  It’s been there for more than 70 years.  The premier will be June 27th at the Center for the Arts in Jackson.  Jennifer Tennican is the filmmaker and she joins Bob Beck.

Centennial based, Americana musician J. Shogren has just released a new album “God Bless These Crooked Little Songs.” Anna Rader produced this profile.

Sheridan based, Nammy award-winning musician Gary Small has  released a new record called "Hostiles and Renegades."  Anna Rader produced this profile.

One Ton Pig recorded live

Mar 29, 2012

Jackson Hole bluegrass/Americana quintet One Ton Pig visited Wyoming Public Radio February 3, 2012 and performed live on Morning Music.

Film maker Daniel Junge, who grew up in Cheyenne, won an Oscar this week for his film “Saving Face.” It’s a documentary about the disturbing trend of Pakistani men throwing acid in the faces of women.

The film follows several victims, and even though some of them face ongoing threats from their attackers, Junge says they were eager to be filmed.

“These women want to be heard,” Junge said. “They’ve had this awful thing happen to them, and I think they saw the chance to tell their stories with our cameras.”

Rebecca Martinez / Wyoming Public Radio

By Sara Hossaini

The University of Wyoming dedicated its new Visual Arts building today.

Art student Beth Cochran loves the new art building, and points out a feature she’s particularly excited about while leading a tour.

“The lockers are brand new and we’re really, really excited. They’re really, really  nice,” Cochran says.

The Visual Arts building is huge, bright and energy efficient. The 79,000 square foot facility includes studios for faculty and staff, a gallery and brand new equipment.

Mike Dowling digs deep into the musical bag of American roots guitar. From bottleneck blues to vintage jazz and much more in between, Mike's musicality, depth, and mastery of the instrument translates fluently to flattop, archtop, and resonator guitars alike.

David Wax Museum

Dec 15, 2011

– April 27, 2011

David Wax Museum is the Boston- based folk duo of  David Wax and Suz Slezak.  They perform and talk with Grady Kirkpatrick about their journey from Missouri and Virginia to Mexico, California and eventually Boston.  Get the story behind the donkey jawbone.

Spencer Bohren

Dec 13, 2011

October 31, 2011- Music and conversation with artist, storyteller, singer/ songwriter, guitarist, Casper native and New Orleans resident Spencer Bohren.

Grady Kirkpatrick talked with film producer Jennifer Tennican about documenting the  historic watering hole in Wilson, Wyoming. Includes music from the soundtrack.

The UW Symphony Orchestra has a special guest: Danish conductor Peter Ettrup Larsen. He's directing a concert of Nordic music at the University of Wyoming this evening. Among the pieces the orchestra will be playing is a symphony by Danish composer Carl Nielsen, called "The Four Temperaments." Larsen says it has the power to speak to anyone -- even people who aren't usually interested in classical music.

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