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Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here and Now

NPR, WBUR, Boston and public radio stations across the country are joining forces to bring listeners news and analysis in midday with Here & Now. Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics. Here & Now, produced by WBUR since 1997, is expanding to two hours on July 1 with co-hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Jewelry Heist In Cannes Is Third In 3 Months

A view of the Carlton hotel, in Cannes, southern France, the scene of a daylight raid, Sunday, July 28, 2013. (Lionel Cironneau/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:10 pm

A lone man wearing gloves, a cap, and a scarf to mask his face sneaked into a diamond show in a luxury Cannes hotel and made off with some $136 million of loot, a French state prosecutor said Monday – more than twice the initial estimated take from the weekend hold-up.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Home Construction Roars Back in Colorado

A home under construction by New Town Builders in Denver's Stapleton neighborhood. The company is building 78 homes, and all but one have already sold. (Ben Markus/Colorado Public Radio)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:10 pm

After years of lackluster growth, single-family home construction is finally making a comeback in many parts of the country.

One of the states leading the way is Colorado.

Permits to build homes there are at their highest level in six years, according to numbers released by the U.S. Census Department last week.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Ben Marcus of Colorado Public Radio reports on what’s driving the increase.

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NPR Story
1:12 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

From 'Princess Bride' Villain To Playwright

From left: Wallace Shawn, Larry Pine and Deborah Eisenberg make up the cast of The Designated Mourner. Written by Shawn and directed by Andre Gregory, the Public Theater show is a product of one of the longest collaborations in the history of the American theater. (Joan Marcus/The Public Theater)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:10 pm

New York’s Public Theater is putting on a showcase of the work of playwright Wallace Shawn.

The name probably sounds familiar, but you might know him better for his acting roles than his intellectually-demanding and rarely produced plays.

Over the last 40 years Shawn has written a handful of plays. The Pubic Theater is presenting the American premier of his play “Grasses of a Thousand Colors” later this fall.

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NPR Story
12:36 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Gay Priest Calls Pope's Comments 'Step In Right Direction'

Pope Francis speaks during a news conference aboard the papal flight on its way back from Brazil, Monday, July 29, 2013. (Luca Zennaro/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:10 pm

Pope Francis spoke with reporters this morning in an extraordinary, impromptu press conference on board his plane on the way back to Italy from Brazil.

The National Catholic Reporter’s John Allen Jr. writes that the 76-year-old Pope stood the whole time and never refused a question, even thanking a reporter who asked about charges of homosexual conduct against his appointee to reform the Vatican bank.

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NPR Story
12:04 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Singer-Songwriter Laura Veirs Greets The Sun

Singer-songwriter Laura Veirs. (Chloe Aftel)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:10 pm

Each week NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson brings Here & Now something new to listen to.

This week he introduces us to Portland-based singer-songwriter Laura Veirs’ “Sun Song” from her new album “Warp And Weft.”

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NPR Story
12:04 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Murdered Women Remembered In East Cleveland

East Cleveland residents hold up flyers of Shirellda Terry at a Friday vigil at 146th & St. Clair (Brian Bull/WCPN)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:10 pm

While 35-year-old Michael Madison sits in an Ohio jail cell, accused of multiple murders, friends and family of his alleged victims are mourning.

The bodies of Angela Deskins, Shetisha Sheeley and Shirellda Terry were found last week in trash bags near Madison’s East Cleveland apartment.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network WCPN’s Brian Bull attended several events this past weekend honoring their lives.

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NPR Story
12:04 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

A Claim That Electric Cars Aren't Green Fuels Firestorm

An electric charging station is seen on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 in Montpelier, Vt. (Toby Talbot/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:10 pm

Plug-in electric cars have lower greenhouse gas emissions than the average gas-guzzling vehicle.

But conservationist Ozzie Zehner argues in a piece called “Unclean at Any Speed“ that electric cars may be worse for the environment than traditional gas-powered cars.

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NPR Story
2:28 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Hedge Fund Pleads Not Guilty To Fraud Charges

General Council for SAC Capital Advisors LP, Peter Nussbaum exits Manhattan federal court, Friday, July 26, 2013, in New York. (Louis Lanzano/AP)

Prosecutors said a large volume of evidence including electronic messages, court-ordered wiretaps and consensual recordings is stacked against a Connecticut-based hedge fund that pleaded not guilty Friday to criminal charges accusing it of letting insider trading flourish for more than a decade.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Antonia Apps told a federal judge in Manhattan that investigators had “voluminous” evidence against SAC Capital Advisors, a Stamford, Conn.-based firm owned by billionaire Steven A. Cohen.

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Film Critic Makes Acting Debut In 'Computer Chess'

Film critic Gerald Peary plays Pat Henderson in the new film “Computer Chess.” (YouTube)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:25 pm

It’s probably safe to say most professional film critics feel quite comfortable scrutinizing movies in darkened theaters.

But Gerald Peary, a longtime reviewer for the now-defunct Alternative News Weekly, the Boston Phoenix and other national publications, recently made a bold leap to the other side of the camera.

His acting debut is in “Computer Chess”, a quirky new feature by indie filmmaker Andrew Bujalski.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Andrea Shea of WBUR has the story.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

A-Rod Wants To Play, Yankees Refuse

New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez speaks to reporters after his second rehab baseball game with the Charleston RiverDogs, against the Rome Braves in Charleston, S.C., Wednesday, July 3, 2013. (Chuck Burton/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:25 pm

Alex Rodriguez, still recovering from an injury, issued a statement early yesterday asking to be activated for Friday’s game against the Tampa Bay Rays, but the Yankees declined.

When asked by WFAN radio if he still trust the Yankees, A-Rod said, “You know, I’d rather not get into that.”

NPR’s Mike Pesca joins us to explain what’s going on off the baseball diamond.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

The Impact Of Seeing Disaster Videos Over And Over

A screenshot from a video of the train derailment in Spain. (YouTube)

The train derailment in Spain is the latest in a series of disasters this year that have been caught on video and been played over and over again in the media.

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NPR Story
12:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

New Music: From Parisian Blues To American Pop

The members of the Washington, D.C. band Misun. (Misun)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:25 pm

KCRW’s DJ Travis Holcombe joins us regularly to play some of the music that’s been catching his ear.

Today, he brings us songs by French-born Don Cavalli, British band Temples, North Carolina singer-songwriter Jackson Scott and D.C. pop trio Misun.

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NPR Story
12:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

If Detroit Went Bankrupt, Why Is Philadelphia Paying?

An empty field north of Detroit's downtown, Oct. 24, 2012. (Carlos Osorio/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:25 pm

When Detroit filed for bankruptcy last week, city comptrollers and treasurers around the country held their collective breaths. That’s because cities, it turns out, don’t file for bankruptcy in a vacuum.

Philadelphia is already feeling the effects of Detroit’s bankruptcy.

That city will pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional interest costs over the next 20 years because the interest rate on Philly’s new $197 million bond offering is going up a quarter percent.

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NPR Story
12:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

London Marks One-Year Anniversary Of The Olympics

Inside the London Olympic Stadium in April 2012. (jeffowenphotos/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:25 pm

A new poll shows two-thirds of UK residents believe the country got its money’s worth from the Olympics, even though the $13 billion cost was three times the original budget.

London is celebrating the one-year anniversary of the games this weekend with a big international track and field meet in the Olympic Stadium, featuring Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt.

The BBC’s Alex Capstick looks at the legacy of the London Olympics.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

An Argument Against Standing Desks

(Pace McCulloch)

One office worker says he enjoys sitting and he’s tired of the “superior moral attitude” from the standers around him.

Writer Ben Crair told Here & Now he accepts the medical studies showing that sitting at your desk is bad for your health. His objection to standing is based on “the pure satisfaction I get from sitting,” he said.

He argues there are other solutions to the health problem of sitting too long.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

New Alzheimer's Research Could Lead To Treatments

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Feb. 6, 2012. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

A new report in the journal Nature shows a significant step forward in figuring out what causes things to go wrong in the brain early on in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research could lead to new treatments.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is projected to triple by 2050. So there’s urgent demand for treatments — or even better, a cure — but so far, there has been little progress on that front.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

DREAMer Hopes For Full Citizenship

Renata Teodoro is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Here & Now)

As a child, 25-year-old Renata Teodoro was brought to the U.S. from Brazil by her parents, who lived and worked in the Boston area until her father’s asylum application was denied and her mother was deported.

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NPR Story
12:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Award-Winning Novel On Asian American Artists

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:55 pm

In “The Collective,” writer Don Lee tells the story of three Asian Americans who meet at college and eventually form an artists’ collective in Cambridge, Mass.

The novel is a meditation on friendship and what it means to be Asian and an artist in the United States.

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NPR Story
12:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Story Update: A Victory In Fight To Overhaul Penn Station

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:55 pm

There’s an update on a story Here & Now brought you in May, about the fate of New York City’s Pennsylvania Station.

On Wednesday, the New York City Council voted to limit Madison Square Garden’s permit to 10 years. Right now, the Garden sits on top of Penn Station.

With this decision, the stadium will have to find another spot. That’s great news to a couple of activists who said Penn Station was in need of a serious overhaul.

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NPR Story
12:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Remembering Faye Hunter Of 'Let's Active'

Faye Hunter, the founding bassist of Let's Active. (Facebook)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:55 pm

Everybody knows R.E.M. but there were so many other southern bands that played the sort of jangly guitar pop that the boys from Athens, Georgia, made famous.

One of my favorites was Let’s Active, formed by Mitch Easter, Sara Romweber and Faye Hunter in 1981.

Any band that can produce a song like “Every Dog Has His Day” is OK in my book.

Well, Faye Hunter, who played bass and sang in Let’s Active, died on July 21, apparently a suicide.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Why Is Galesburg So Popular With Presidents?

President Barack Obama visits the Galesburg High School football team, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011, in Galesburg, Ill., during his three-day economic bus tour. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:04 pm

If you’re wondering why President Obama is in Galesburg, Illinois, he has been there before and it turns out he’s not the only president or future president to visit the small prairie town west of Chicago.

Fifteen men who were either in the nation’s highest office or went on to become president have made stops in Galesburg.

The first future President to visit was Abraham Lincoln in 1858 when he was running for the U.S. Senate.

One of the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates was held on the Knox College campus that President Obama is visiting today.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

President Obama Shifts Focus To The Economy

President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Obama is traveling to Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., to kick off a series of speeches that will lay out his vision for rebuilding the economy. (Cliff Owen/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:04 pm

NPR’s national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us to talk about the politics of President Obama’s economic speech at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Growing Up Royal

0724_Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, then Princess Elizabeth, center, waves as she stands on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, London, with her grandparents King George V and Queen Mary, in this May 6, 1935 photo. Princess Margaret is just visible over the balcony edge. (AP)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:04 pm

The infant prince, third in line to the British throne, is now home with his parents, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

His life will be one of privilege, of course, but also one of formal duty and protocol.

For some perspective, consider the childhood of his great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who grew up during World War II. The Queen visited her great-grandson for the first time today.

The BBC’s Nicola Stanbridge reports on the life of an heir to the throne.

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NPR Story
11:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

12-Year-Old Learns Perils Of Day Trading In New Novel

In her new book for young adults, “The Short Seller,” Elissa Brent Weissman gives us the ultimate “short seller”: 12-year-old Lindy Sachs (excerpt below).

Math bores her until her father starts teaching her how to trade on the stock market.

When Lindy is home sick with a bout of mono, he gives her her very own account and $100 to invest however as she likes, and she quickly gets in over her head.

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NPR Story
11:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

A New Kind Of Second Opinion — At A Price

(surroundsound5000/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:04 pm

Psychologist Sandor Gardos had seen 80 experts, including Nobel prize winners, but none were able to diagnose his serious medical condition — much less offer any effective treatment.

That’s when a friend told him about a new firm, MetaMed, which specializes in a different kind of second opinion. It offers personalized research for a price to people with difficult medical conditions.

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NPR Story
11:41 am
Wed July 24, 2013

How The Timing Of Meals Affects Our Waistlines

(Nicole Salow/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 12:54 pm

A growing body of evidence suggests that it’s not just what we eat that’s important. It’s also when we eat that influence our health and waistlines.

We take a look at the science, in a conversation with NPR’s food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

50 Years On, The Stones Are Still Rocking

The Rolling Stones: Charlie Watts, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger, Ronnie Wood. (Mark Seliger)

The Rolling Stones have been making their special blend of music since the early 60s.

Led by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, they’re still cranking it out, still playing to sold-out crowds in huge arenas.

A new book, “Rocks Off: 50 Tracks That Tell The Story Of The Rolling Stones,” digs into their catalog of great songs (excerpt below).

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Report: Families Reaching Limit In Paying For College

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 12:52 pm

The authors of a just-released report say “we’ve entered into a post-recession reality in how families are paying for college.”

Education lender Sallie May’s annual report on how Americans pay for college shows that the use of college savings plans is at its highest level, even as annual spending has leveled out to $21,178.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

First-Time Home Buyers Still Being Shut Out

(Images_of_Money/Flickr)

There has already been lots of news on housing this week. Tomorrow, the Federal Reserve will released data on new residential sales.

Yesterday, the National Association of Realtors reported that existing home sales dipped 1.2 percent in June. The good news is that number is 15.2 percent better than where we were June of last year.

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NPR Story
11:41 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Women Not Just On The Sidelines In Summer Film

Actress Lili Taylor is one of the stars in "The Conjuring." (Warner Bros. Pictures)

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 1:08 pm

The Conjuring” rules at the box office. The haunted house thriller pulled in more than $41 million in its opening weekend.

Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr finds the movie intriguing.

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