Here and Now on Wyoming Public Radio

Monday - Thursday 12:00PM-2:00PM
  • Hosted by Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here and Now

NPR, WBUR, Boston and public radio stations across the country are joining forces to bring listeners news and analysis in midday with Here & Now. Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics. Here & Now, produced by WBUR since 1997, is expanding to two hours on July 1 with co-hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

The typical time between pregnancies for American mothers is 2.5 years, according to new research. Doctors say that is a healthy amount of time to wait. But a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that nearly a third of women space their births too close – fewer than 18 months between pregnancies.

The study found that “while there is no consensus on optimal IPI [interpregnancy interval], research has shown that short intervals (less than 18 months) and long intervals (60 months or more) were associated with higher risks of adverse health outcomes.”

In a federal court this week, the British sportswear and equipment supplier Mitre Sports International is claiming HBO defamed the company in a 2008 segment of "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel" called "Children of Industry."

The segment portrayed the story of children under the age of 14 hand-sewing Mitre soccer balls for little to no money. Mitre claims that the interviews were edited to be misleading, that parts of the story were fabricated and that the children were coerced to say what they did on camera.

On this day in 1861, a day after Fort Sumter fell, President Lincoln ordered up 75,000 troops. Within days, volunteers swarmed to Washington. It was decided that some would stay in the U.S. Senate chamber, which had only been in use for two years. Upwards of 4,000 troops took up residence, and soon the chamber was described as filthy and “alive with lice.”

The agriculture industry in California accounts for 80 percent of the state’s total water use, so when Governor Jerry Brown’s recent mandatory water restrictions didn’t include farmers, he got a lot of flak.

Bob Bates, the 73-year-old reserve police officer in Tulsa, Oklahoma, who fatally shot a man after police say he confused his gun for his taser, now faces a second-degree manslaughter charge.

Meanwhile, in North Charleston, South Carolina, more video has surfaced showing another violent arrest by officer Michael Slager. Slager is being charged with murder after fatally shooting an unarmed motorist who tried to flee a traffic stop.

Saturday Night Live's Cecily Strong

Apr 14, 2015

Cecily Strong is joining the impressive list of female comedians who are taking their talent beyond the Saturday Night Live stage.

Strong has been asked to host the White House Correspondents Dinner later this month, and she is appearing in her first movie, “The Bronze,” which hits theaters this summer.

Strong is famous on SNL for her recurring character the “girl you wish you hadn’t started a conversation with at a party” on Weekend Update – a sketch she once hosted.

Russia is closing in on a deal that would send Russian missiles to Iran. Russian President Vladimir Putin approved the delivery of S-300 surface-to-air-missiles on Monday. A similar deal fell through back in 2010 under pressure from Western governments.

A study out today finds nearly three-quarters of people who receive public assistance benefits from the government belong to a working family.

The report from University of California, Berkeley, says low-wage jobs have left federal and state governments holding the tab for higher medicaid, food stamp and child subsidy payouts. Researchers say the cost to taxpayers is now $153 billion a year.

R&B and jazz singer Ledisi portrayed gospel legend Mahalia Jackson in the movie “Selma.” In the film, she comforts an anxious Martin Luther King Jr. with an arresting version of “Take My Hand, Precious Lord.” Ledisi has been out on tour for her new album, “The Intimate Truth,” and speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban leader Raul Castro made history this weekend when they sat down together in Panama.

The men were attending the Summit of the Americas. It was the first time the United States attended the summit since it began in the 1990s.

Obama stressed the economic benefits that thawed U.S.-Cuban relations would bring to both countries, but the president did not announce that Cuba would be removed from the U.S. State Sponsors of Terrorism list.

Author Malcolm Gladwell is known for taking an alternate tack to conventional thinking, in books like “The Tipping Point” and “Outliers.”

Street Art Meets Ballet In Miami

Apr 10, 2015

At the Miami City Ballet tonight, the dancers are sharing the stage with a backdrop that includes the face of wrestler Andre the Giant.

That’s what happens when one of the country’s most sought-after choreographers teams up with one the country’s most famous street artists.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Alicia Zuckerman of WLRN reports.

In the show “Sweatshop,” several Norwegian fashion bloggers flew to Cambodia, where they lived and worked in the clothing industry.

The three fashionistas – Frida, Ludwig and Anniken – not only saw, but experienced the hardships of Cambodian clothing workers, including low pay, terrible working conditions and sleeping on a cold, hard floor.

The photos and stories of California’s historic drought seem cinematic because they are. The 1974 film “Chinatown” involves a fictional Los Angeles mayor making the case for building an aqueduct to bring water from farm areas to Los Angeles, to supply water for people to move to the city.

Kevin Starr, history professor at the University of Southern California, says comparing the present-day drought to the California of “Chinatown” is especially apt.

New surveys out this month suggest Americans still don't understand the value of saving. Millennials are not saving, primarily because of student debt and low wages.

But it's not just young people. The National Foundation for Credit Counseling released a survey showing seven in 10 Americans still say they are consistently worried about their finances.

There is evidence that Americans have gotten better at managing credit card debt, but bottom line, the survey finds people are not getting their finances in good order.

Half of Colorado’s drill rigs have gone idle since the end of October. The decline in the oil economy’s growth here is directly tied to the low price of oil. Economic experts aren’t sure where prices are headed, and that translates into economic uncertainty and layoffs. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Grace Hood of Colorado Public Radio reports.

A jury has convicted Dzhokhar Tsarnaev of all 30 counts he faced stemming from the 2013 bombing of the Boston Marathon.

Tsarnaev was found guilty Wednesday on charges that included conspiracy and use of a weapon of mass destruction. Of the 30 charges, 17 are punishable by death.

Tsarnaev’s lawyers admitted he participated in the bombings, but said his now-dead older brother was the driving force behind the deadly attack.

A white South Carolina police officer who claimed he killed a black man in self-defense has been fired and faces murder charges after a bystander’s video recorded him firing eight shots at the man’s back as he ran away. The city’s mayor also said he’s ordered body cameras to be worn by every single officer on the force.

The officer, Michael Thomas Slager, has been fired, but the town will continue to pay for his health insurance because his wife is eight months pregnant, said North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey, who called it a tragedy for two families.

A New Kind Of Nuclear Reactor?

Apr 8, 2015

Nuclear energy is fraught. What do you do with the spent radioactive fuel rods? What happens if there’s a meltdown? These worries have led many to write the whole thing off, and some to rebel against it. But a startup in Cambridge, Mass., thinks things can be different – like, revolutionary different. Ari Daniel, with Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, has our story.

TV Owns Your Sunday Nights

Apr 7, 2015

If you have plans Sunday night, NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans says you may want to cancel.

This Sunday, April 12, there are new episodes of nine critically-acclaimed television shows, including AMC’s “Mad Men,” HBO’s “Game of Thrones” and CBS’s “The Good Wife.”

Deggans tells Here & Now’s Robin Young exactly why there are so many great shows on Sunday, how to manage the watch-load throughout the week and whether television can keep up with this golden age.

Meb Keflezighi has been running at a world class level for more than a decade, going back to his first Olympic Games in 2000. He knew he wasn’t ready to win a medal in that race, but he knew that if he kept training and working hard someday the medals and the victories would come. They have.

Low Oil Prices Hurt Recycling Industry

Apr 7, 2015

Low oil prices are starting to have an impact on an industry that might surprise people – recycling.

As The Wall Street Journal reports, “Plastic is often derived from oil, and there used to be money in recycled scrap. Not anymore. The fall in oil prices has dragged down the price of virgin plastic, erasing the recyclers’ advantage.”

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to Georgi Kantchev of The Wall Street Journal about the impact of oil prices on recycling.

The question is often posed to physics students who have always given answers under the assumption that Earth has uniform mass. But now, Alex Klotz, a McGill University grad student, has come up with a new calculation that challenges this concept.

His findings were published in the American Journal of Physics – a publication of the American Association of Physics Teachers.

Victor Gotbaum, one of the nation’s most powerful and prominent labor leaders during the 1970s and 80s, has died. Gotbaum led a New York branch of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), during a tense era in American labor history. He is also credited with helping New York City avoid bankruptcy in 1975. Victor’s daughter, Rachel Gotbaum, has worked with Here & Now and WBUR for years as a producer and reporter.

Is Ukraine’s fragile ceasefire in danger? That’s what retired General Wesley Clark, the former supreme commander of NATO thinks.

Clark tells Defense One he believes pro-Russian forces are getting ready for a spring offensive that could run into May – May 9 to be exact, or what is known as Victory Day or V-E Day in Russia.

“We see planning in Russia to celebrate this. It would be wonderful for Putin if he could wrap up his conquest and celebrate it on that day if the allies are boycotting his celebration,” said Clark in an interview with Patrick Tucker.

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month, and so we’re re-running our conversation with the Pulitzer Prize winning author of, “A Deadly Wandering: A Tale of Tragedy and Redemption in the Age of Attention.” The book tells the story of a young college student in Utah, who was texting while driving when he struck and killed two rocket scientists.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said today that his country will stand by the commitments it made in the nuclear deal, as long as the U.S. and other world powers stand by theirs. A big part of the framework agreement, announced yesterday, is the lifting of Western sanctions on Iran, including on the export of Iranian oil.

Oil prices fell yesterday on news of the agreement, even though it’s still unclear when sanctions on Iranian oil might actually be lifted.

With 83 weeks to go until the next presidential election, the candidates – both official and unofficial – were under the microscope, as two big political stories captured the week’s headlines.

The divisive Religious Freedom Restoration Act, signed into law by Indiana Governor Mike Pence and later revised, was barely days old when it began affecting the Republican field. And a tentative Iran deal received criticism from former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and praise from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

After marathon negotiations, the United States, Iran and five other world powers announced a deal Thursday outlining limits on Iran’s nuclear program so it cannot lead to atomic weapons, directing negotiators toward a comprehensive agreement within three months.

Reading out a joint statement, European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini hailed what she called a “decisive step” after more than a decade of work.

LED Cello Lights Up The Stage

Apr 2, 2015

Tonight, the renowned avant-garde cellist Maya Beiser will perform at the Dillon Art gallery in New York City. Though Beiser is known for her passionate interpretations of modern music, at this show she’ll be playing an instrument that’s nearly as intense as she is: an electric cello enhanced with LED lights. Jean Kumagai, from Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, has this report.

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