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Morning Edition

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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NPR Story
3:23 am
Thu July 12, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 10:21 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Sometimes friends become more than friends and Facebook just won't do. And if the friend in question are dogs, they may want to hear today's last word in business.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PUPPY LOVE")

PAUL ANKA: (Singing) And they called it puppy love, oh I...

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Brazil's dog population is second only to the U.S. Two entrepreneurs - a brother and sister team - are hoping to capitalize on that by building an eight-story hotel for pets. With one floor apparently is dedicated to mating.

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NPR Story
3:23 am
Thu July 12, 2012

GOP Courts Republicans Living In Israel

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 6:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Both Republicans and Democrats will tell you, the Jewish vote is vital in the upcoming presidential election. And this year, one party is going very far in its efforts to woo Jewish voters, all the way to Israel. Israel is home to a large American community, and for the first time, the Republican Party has crossed the Atlantic to actively campaign.

NPR's Middle East correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports that Republican Party envoys find themselves on fertile ground.

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Middle East
1:09 am
Thu July 12, 2012

For Syrian-American Doctors, A Painful Homecoming

Dr. Yahya Abdul Rahim (left) and Dr. Ammar Ghanem are among the Syrian-American doctors who have come to the Turkish-Syrian border to help Syrians wounded in the anti-government revolt. Some work to improve the flow of supplies; others treat patients in Turkey; still others, like Ghanem, strap backpacks on and walk across the border to help those in Syria.
Deborah Amos NPR

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 6:30 pm

The Turkish border is a key link for the revolt in neighboring Syria. Turkish ambulances are stationed at border crossings to cope with the flood of injured Syrians, often as many as 30 a day. And now, Syrian-American doctors are volunteering in a humanitarian effort to help the wounded and to bring crucial medicines for field hospitals inside Syria.

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All Tech Considered
1:08 am
Thu July 12, 2012

New Online Users Have A Longer Timeline

More older adults are using the Internet, thanks in part to introductory classes offered offline.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 11:50 am

Facebook started as a social network for college students. But now that anyone can join, here's a status update: Many of its newest members are senior citizens.

At 101 years old, Florence Detlor is one of the oldest people on Facebook. She says she's always been someone who wants to keep up on the cutting edge of technology.

"Because that's what makes one time different from another," she says.

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Law
1:04 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Fake Pot Is A Real Problem For Regulators

A screengrab from the Mr. Nice Guy site shows the company's products, including Relaxinol, which was blamed for contributing to an accidental death.
NPR

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 11:09 am

This week, President Obama signed a law banning synthetic marijuana and other synthetic drugs. Dozens of states and local governments have already tried to outlaw fake marijuana, which has been blamed for hundreds of emergency room visits and a handful of fatalities.

But the bans have proved largely ineffective, and there are fears that the federal law won't be any different.

Synthetic marijuana looks a bit like dried grass clippings. It's readily available on the Internet and in convenience stores and smoke shops, where it's sold as herbal incense or potpourri.

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Around the Nation
5:33 am
Wed July 11, 2012

City Of Brotherly Love Has A Different Kind Of Cupid

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:11 am
Wed July 11, 2012

eHarmony Has An App For When A Date Goes South

The app simulates a rescue phone call. The app can show a telephone number — a coworker's, your mother's — and a photo of the supposed caller. Although it can't guarantee your date will believe the fake excuse.

Business
4:50 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Third California City To Seek Bankruptcy Protection

The City Council in San Bernardino, Calif., voted Tuesday night to seek Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection, making it the third California city in less than two weeks to make the rare move. The city faces a $45 million budget shortfall.

NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Secrecy Surrounds Jesse Jackson Jr.'s Illness

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Now to a political mystery in Chicago. Constituents and colleagues are demanding to know more about the whereabouts and condition of Congressman Jesse Jackson, Junior. Jackson took a leave of absence a month ago, but his office has been vague about why. And that lack of information about Jackson is the talk of the town. From Chicago, NPR's David Schaper reports.

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NPR Story
3:16 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Obama Tells Iowa Voters He'll Help The Middle-Class

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:49 am

President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney are hitting the campaign trail hard this week. On Tuesday, the president was campaigning in Iowa — the state that helped to launch his White House bid in 2008. He told supporters in Iowa he wants a second term in order to finish what he started.

NPR Story
3:04 am
Wed July 11, 2012

National League Wins Baseball's All-Star Game 8-0

Major League Baseball's 83rd All-Star Game wrapped up Tuesday night in Kansas City, Missouri. The National League trounced the American league in an 8-0 blowout, with impressive performances by some San Francisco Giants. Melky Cabrera of the Giants hit the game's only home run and took home the MVP Award.

NPR Story
2:54 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Peter O'Toole Bids Farewell To The Big Screen

Just before his 80th birthday, actor Peter O'Toole announced he is retiring. He has been nominated eight times for Academy Awards but never won. He did receive an honorary Oscar.

Science
2:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Researchers Take Stock Of 2011 Weather

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Across America people are sweltering through extreme heat this year, continuing a long-term trend of rising temperatures. Inevitably, many are wondering if the scorching heat is due to global warming. Scientists are expected to dig into the data and grapple with that in the months to come. They've already taken a stab at a possible connection with last year's extreme weather events, like the blistering drought in Texas. NPR's Richard Harris reports.

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NPR Story
2:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Manchester United Hopes To Score With Its IPO

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:06 am

Manchester United is the most famous soccer team in the United Kingdom, and one of the world's most popular sports teams. Now its owners are hoping the team's popularity will translate into big bucks. They're planning to sell Manchester United stock on the New York Stock Exchange. Roger Blitz, of the Financial Times, talks to Renee Montagne about the team's IPO.

NPR Story
2:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The ownership of American pro sports got just a little more international. That's our last word in business today.

Pro basketball's Brooklyn Nets, formerly the New Jersey Nets, are owned by a Russian businessman. An Indonesian media owner possesses part of the Philadelphia 76ers. And now, that same Indonesian man is among the new investors in D.C. United, the pro soccer team. His name is Erick Thohir.

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Asia
1:39 am
Wed July 11, 2012

'Hard Questions' Remain In U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Pakistani border guards check trucks heading to Afghanistan, in the tribal area of Khyber last week.
Qazi Rauf AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:45 am

A U.S. operation in the mountains near Afghanistan last November killed 24 Pakistani soldiers. Pakistan wanted an apology. The U.S. refused. In response, Pakistan shut down supply routes to Afghanistan for NATO convoys.

After intense talks, two border crossings were reopened last week to convoys for the U.S. and NATO forces.

Pakistan's ambassador in Washington, Sherry Rehman, was at the center of the negotiations. Afterward she called it a moment of great opportunity for the two countries.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
1:23 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Women's Field Hockey Aims To End Olympic Drought

Paige Selenski (right) of the United States fights for the ball against two Mexican opponents in a women's field hockey match at last October's Pan American Games in Mexico.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:45 am

As one of the world's most popular sports, field hockey produces celebrities in Argentina, the Netherlands and Australia. But the sport is relatively obscure in the United States, where members of the women's national team receive a small monthly stipend and their notoriety comes from outside the country.

Later this month, the group heads to London, where it will try to earn the first American medal in the sport in 28 years.

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Economy
1:22 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Euro Currency Still Faring Well, For Now

Over the last 13 years, the euro has been worth on average $1.21, only a penny less than its current price of $1.22 per euro.
Michael Probst AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 10:42 am

The euro touched a two-year low against the dollar Tuesday, as concerns about the eurozone debt crisis continued.

Despite a recession across much of the eurozone and even predictions of the currency's demise, however, the euro has held up relatively well during this crisis.

Over the last 13 year, it has taken on average $1.21 to buy a euro. Now, even in this midst of this crisis, it's worth virtually the same ($1.22).

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World
1:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Spanish Families Share Expenses And Tradition

A woman pushes a pram though the Plaza de Murillo on July 3 in Madrid. Spain's custom for multiple families to live under the same roof has tied them closer together as well as their wallets. The country has the highest unemployment rate in the Eurozone, and government benefits help aid those out of work.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 7:48 pm

What used to be a Spanish tradition is now becoming more of an economic necessity.

In Spain, the social safety net that helps people survive the economic crisis has two parts: government benefits and close family ties. The country has the highest rate in Europe of multi-generational families all living together.

With a quarter of Spaniards out of work, more parents pick up their kids from school themselves, in the middle of what would have been a workday.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Will Medicaid Bring The Uninsured Out Of The Woodwork?

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is the latest state executive to say no to an expansion of Medicaid.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 2:54 pm

Ever since the Supreme Court decided last month that an expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act should be optional, quite a few Republican governors have been vowing to take a pass.

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Sweetness And Light
8:03 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Going To The Game: The Price Is Wrong?

Andy Murray returns a shot during the men's final match at Wimbledon. A pair of tickets for the match went for £32,000 (about $50,000).
Paul Gilham Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:45 am

Sports is more ubiquitous than ever on television. And sports is almost the only thing that's left, live, on TV. NBC Universal is even going to let Americans see the Olympics live this year.

Nevertheless, despite TV's charm, last week as Andy Murray, Great Britain's homeboy, drew closer to making the Wimbledon final, the word was that tickets for actual Centre Court seats would be scalped for up to £32,000 a pair. If you're not hanging around the currency exchange market, that comes to something like $50,000. For two tickets. To a game.

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Around the Nation
5:03 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Elaborate Deer Stands Draw Complaints In Minnesota

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Some forest officials in Minnesota are complaining about deer stands. Deer stands are those small platforms hunters set up in trees to get a better view. In some deer-hunting areas, they've grown into veritable tree houses with stairs, shingled roofs, windows, heaters, lounge chairs, and all on public land. One county land commissioner told the Duluth News Tribune: We're seeing mansions out there. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
4:55 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Batman is No Match For Physics

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:53 am

Batman may be able to save Gotham from villians but the rules of physics apply to him. Four British graduate students produced a paper called "Trajectory of a falling Batman." It says Batman could glide off a 500-foot building as he does in the 2005 movie but he'd hit the ground at a life-threatening 50 miles-per-hour.

Law
4:47 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Congolese Warlord Sentenced By Court In The Hague

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:52 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's been a decade since the first permanent International Criminal Court was created. Today, it delivered its first-ever sentence. The Hague-based court ordered a Congolese warlord to serve 14 years in prison. Thomas Lubango was convicted in March of recruiting and using children as soldiers in his militia. During a four-year conflict, Lubango forced children to fight for him, taking up arms and machetes which they used to slaughter Lubango's tribal enemies in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Business
4:00 am
Tue July 10, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:52 am

Over a decade ago, Britton Nicholas Newlife bet with a bookmaker that Roger Federer would win Wimbledon seven times. The bet was for $2,300 and the odds were 66-1. Newlife died three years ago, but he left his betting ticket to the international charity Oxfam. On Sunday, Federer won his seventh Wimbledon title. Oxfam will receive more than $150,000 in winnings.

Black Lung Returns To Coal Country
2:45 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Black-Lung Rule Loopholes Leave Miners Vulnerable

here.)" href="/post/black-lung-rule-loopholes-leave-miners-vulnerable" class="noexit lightbox">
Coal miners rally for black lung law reform on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in 1975. (See more from Earl Dotter's "Quiet Sickness" series here.)
Courtesy of Earl Dotter

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 8:41 pm

Part two of a two-part series.

Thousands of coal miners continued to suffer and die from black lung during the 40 years that tough new limits on exposure to coal dust were supposed to provide protection.

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It's All Politics
2:43 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Romney Outraises Obama By $35 Million In June

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:02 pm

The latest fundraising numbers are in for the two presidential campaigns, and the amounts are eye-popping. President Obama and the Democratic Party raised $71 million, which is an enormous haul. But it was dwarfed by Mitt Romney and the Republican National Committee, which together raised $106 million in the month of June.

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Election 2012
1:57 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Bush Tax Cuts: The New Middle-Class Norm

Josh Walling and Randi Cartmill with their children, Jacqueline, Josh and Ryan. Josh Walling says his family, whose household income is below the national median, would lose a substantial amount of money if the Bush tax cuts expired.
Courtesy of Randi Cartmill

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 12:42 pm

The first in an occasional series, Fiscal Cliff Notes, which breaks down the looming "fiscal cliff" of expiring tax cuts and deep automatic spending cuts set to hit around the first of year.

Much of the political focus when discussing the Bush-era tax cuts is on the wealthy, but they're not the only ones who would be affected if the tax cuts are allowed to expire at the end of this year.

The vast majority of American taxpayers would take a hit, including Randi Cartmill and Josh Walling, who live in Madison, Wis., with their three children.

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Dead Stop
1:52 am
Tue July 10, 2012

A City's History Writ Small, In One Cemetery

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:07 pm

On Florida's northeast coast, trams filled with families and school groups run constantly in St. Augustine, hitting nearly all of the old city's historic sites.

But down a side street lies an important piece of St. Augustine's history most visitors don't see, because it's only open one day a month.

"This is Tolomato Cemetery. It was formerly the parish cemetery for what is now the cathedral parish," says Elizabeth Gessner, who heads the cemetery's preservation association.

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Middle East
1:51 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Walls Of Palestinian Homes Come Tumbling Down

Palestinians collect their belongings after Israeli bulldozers raze their house in an Arab neighborhood in east Jerusalem on Feb. 9.
Ahmad Gharbali AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 6:46 am

Israel has dramatically increased its demolitions of unauthorized Palestinian homes in the West Bank and east Jerusalem, according to a recent United Nations report.

Last year, 1,100 Palestinians — more than half of them children — were displaced, an 80 percent increase from the previous year. And demolitions this year continue at a high rate.

For Sami Idriss, the Israeli bulldozers came while the 26-year-old Palestinian was at work.

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