A Prairie Home Companion

Saturday 5:00PM-7:00PM

The only live music and variety show aired nationwide today, A Prairie Home Companion® is a Saturday night staple for radio audiences everywhere. The show features a blend of musical performances, comedy, and collaborations that can't be heard anywhere else.

Hosted by Chris Thile, A Prairie Home Companion draws new, diverse talent to public radio, with guests such as Jack White, Esperanza Spalding, John Hodgman, Tig Notaro, Dawes, Angelique Kidjo, and Steve Martin and The Steep Canyon Rangers.

Chris Thile
Credit prairiehome.org
Chris Thile, Host

Mandolinist Chris Thile is among the most highly acclaimed musicians of his generation.Thile is among the most highly acclaimed musicians of his generation.

Chris made his first Prairie Home Companion appearance in 1996. That broadcast showcased remarkable young artists. Chris, then 15, clearly fit the bill. Since that early APHC booking, Chris, recipient of a 2012 MacArthur "genius" grant, has certainly made his mark - and not only in bluegrass music. His mandolin concerto, Ad astra per alas porci, had its official premiere in 2009 with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. He has collaborated with a who's who of musicians. His album Bass & Mandolin (Nonesuch) with Edgar Meyer won a Grammy, as did The Goat Rodeo Sessions (Sony Masterworks), when he joined forces with Meyer, Stuart Duncan, and Yo-Yo Ma. And his Bach: Sonatas and Partitas, Vol. 1 - music originally composed for violin - was released by Nonesuch Records in 2013.

Historian and author Randall Hansen is a lucky man: The title of one of his books is almost exactly the same as another that recently became very, very well-known.

Hansen's book is Fire And Fury: The Allied Bombing Of Germany 1942-1945. The beginning of that title "Fire and Fury" is the same as that of journalist and author Michael Wolff's new exposé about the Trump administration, Fire And Fury: Inside The Trump White House.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Lea Berman and Jeremy Bernard have organized state dinners and congressional picnics, each serving as White House social secretary for different administrations. Bernard worked for President Obama; Berman for President George W. Bush. And they've collaborated on a new book that uses their White House experiences to draw out lessons in how to handle crises, defuse awkward moments and manage expectations. It's called Treating People Well: The Extraordinary Power Of Civility At Work And In Life.

Dozens of powerful men, including two at NPR, have lost their jobs and reputations in the cultural reckoning that is the #MeToo movement. Clearly, there's tremendous momentum behind it, but where does it go from here? Do those men have a shot at redemption?

Poor families in the United States are having an increasingly difficult time finding an affordable place to live, due to high rents, static incomes and a shortage of housing aid. Tenant advocates worry that the new tax bill, as well as potential cuts in housing aid, will make the problem worse.

During her walk home from church one evening in 1944 in Abbeville, Ala., Recy Taylor was forcefully taken into the woods by six white men and then raped multiple times.

Afterward the men took her back to town, but threatened to kill her if she told anyone what happened.

But Taylor's story was shared, and when people at the NAACP heard about it they sent out an activist, Rosa Parks, to investigate.

Despite the rapists being identified, and at least one man's confession to the crimes, none were ever punished.

Before it got cold this winter, it was warm. Very warm. In fact, new data out Monday shows 2017 was the third warmest year recorded in the lower 48 states.

And it was also a smackdown year for weather disasters: 16 weather events each broke the billion-dollar barrier.

First, the heat. Last year was 2.6 degrees F warmer than the average year during the 20th century.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Real Molly Bloom

Jan 7, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

North Koreans' Attitudes Of The U.S.

Jan 7, 2018

The relationship between President Trump and Kim Jong Un made headlines again. NPR's Michel Martin talks with North Korea expert Jean H. Lee of the Wilson Center about how people on the Korean peninsula view the U.S.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

How Marijuana Became Politicized

Jan 6, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

After 30 years, the time has come. Robert Siegel is stepping down from the host chair of All Things Considered.

And so many listeners have said just how much they'll miss him.

They come from all walks of life, working as truck drivers, speech therapists and Lyft drivers. There are a lot of things they'll miss about Robert, but one thing most of all.

"This will sound funny, he has a soothing voice to me, like it's not soothing where it will put you to sleep, but it's just really calm," says Eurdora Evans, 35, of Harvey, La.

NPR Host Robert Siegel Signs Off

Jan 5, 2018

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the median number of years that American workers have been working for their current employer is a little over four.

I say that to acknowledge how unusual it is that I have been working at National Public Radio for a little over 40 years — 41, to be precise.

For the past 30 years, I've been doing the same job: hosting All Things Considered. And doing it very happily.

No one is more surprised by my tenure than I am.

The James Beard Awards are sometimes called the Oscars of food, with awards for restaurants and chefs every year. This year, the awards committee is encouraging voters in the restaurant industry to consider more than just food and ambiance. They want voters to think about respect, integrity and whether the nominees deserve to be role models.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Dow Jones industrial average finished above 25,000 for the first time, as the long rally in stock prices showed no signs of letting up.

A strong report about hiring from payroll processor ADP helped push stocks higher. Financial stocks did especially well, and an increase in oil prices has benefited the energy sector.

The Dow finished the day at 25,075, a gain of 0.61 percent. Both the Nasdaq composite index and the Standard and Poor's 500 index also finished at record highs.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

President Trump dissolved the presidential commission he established last year to investigate claims of voter fraud in the 2016 election. Multiple states have refused to comply with the commission's requests for information, but the commission was also mired in several lawsuits, including one from Democratic members of the panel.

The Middle East is a region that is used to diplo-speak. When U.S. officials talk about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, they usually parse their words carefully. President Trump, though, is changing that, and it is causing confusion.

Last month, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley explained to the world that although the administration decided to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital, its final status is still up for negotiation.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In the 1970s, William Eggleston shocked the New York art world when the Museum of Modern Art exhibited his color photographs (Until then, most
serious photography had been black and white). Eggleston's pictures of the everyday established color photography and turned him into an art star. At the age of 78, the Memphis native surprised people yet again by releasing his first body of original music last October, an album titled Musik.

Pages