WY Vote

Follow Wyoming Public Radio as we cover the Wyoming and National General Election on November 8th online and on-air. Find out how to listen to NPR and Wyoming Public Media's coverage here. 

Keep up with our reporters during the election on Twitter and Facebook. Just use the hashtag #wyvote and join in on the coverage. See you at the polls! 

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Mayoral candidates Marian Orr and Amy Surdam were friends for a couple of years. Then, they each learned the other was seeking to become Cheyenne’s next mayor. Marian Orr said they decided to meet up.

“We had coffee,” said Orr. “I knew that she was considering, and I wanted to be very upfront with her that I was considering the race, as well.”

Amy Surdam remembered the meeting, as well.

Cheyenne’s two mayoral candidates have raised nearly $50,000 over the course of their campaigns, according to new filings with the Laramie County clerk's office. 

Amy Surdam, who is running on a platform of improving amenities in Cheyenne, raised more than $30,000, largely during the primary race. Of that, $3,500 came from political action committees, including the Cheyenne PAC, Federated Firefighters of Wyoming PAC and the Wyoming Realtors PAC.

Forward Wyoming

Two organizations the Wyoming Republican party alleged violated campaign finance laws sent official responses to the Wyoming Secretary of State’s office. 

The Wyoming GOP said that mailers sent by Forward Wyoming Advocacy were actually paid for by a progressive political consulting firm, but not marked as such. 

But the Executive Director of Forward Wyoming Advocacy, Sydney Stein said in a press release that while her organization contracts with ELLA Wyoming for data management and web design, they are not one and the same.  

Wikipedia

The Wyoming Republican Party has filed two complaints with the Wyoming Secretary of State’s office, alleging certain mailers broke campaign finance laws. The two complaints were filed on October 20 and 25, and refer to two separate mailers sent to Wyoming residents earlier this month, which expressed support for Democratic candidates in legislative races around the state.

Marian Orr, Amy Surdam

The Cheyenne mayoral race is heating up as it heads into its final weeks before Election Day. It’s a historic race, as two women vie to become the city’s first female mayor. 

Pete Souza - Official White House Photo

  

 

With President Obama heading out of office soon, Wyoming lawmakers fear he’s preparing a slew of executive orders that could hurt the western economy.

The president has already done executive actions on everything from the energy policy to immigration. Some have been upheld by the courts, while others have been struck down. But court cases take years, and that has Republicans like Wyoming Senator John Barrasso worried that Obama is going to use his pen on the way out of office.

treasurer.state.wy.us

Wyoming voters will be asked to support a Constitutional Amendment this November that will change the way the state treasurer can manage Wyoming’s rainy day accounts and endowments.

Called Constitutional Amendment A, it will allow the state treasurer to invest that money in the equities market and the expectation is that it will help grow those funds.

Lawrence Struempf

Larry Struempf is hoping to shock the world. The Laramie Libertarian is hoping to win the nod to become Wyoming’s next congressman. Struempf is a Wyoming native who has worked in the field of computer information systems for many years. He is running on a platform of less government and more civil liberties.  He joins us to discuss some of the issues.

Bob Beck

 

 

The campaign season is heading into its last few weeks, and one of the bigger races in this state is the battle for Wyoming’s lone U.S. House Seat. Wyoming Public Radio News Director Bob Beck has been keeping tabs on that race and was a panelist for Thursday night’s debate.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard asked him five questions about that race. 

Bob Beck

Candidates for Wyoming’s lone seat in the U.S. House of Representatives met Thursday night at Casper College for this election’s only debate. Like many past elections, candidates argued over the legitimacy of their ties to the state and their abilities to understand its unique challenges.

Keep It Public, Wyoming Facebook Page

The group Keep it Public, Wyoming is hosting a rally November 5 to protest public lands being transferred from the federal government to the state.

Gage Skidmore

  

Have you heard many western issues pop up in this election cycle? Neither has Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis. She said the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is actually missing a golden opportunity to attract independent voters in the west.

“I know that western issues are taking a backseat to national issues in this campaign, and I get that. But when we’re out in the west, when states like Colorado and Nevada are in play, there are issues that are unique to the west that a presidential candidate can capitalize on.”

Liz Cheney

Liz Cheney is the Republican candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives. She is a former Fox News commentator, an author, the co-founder of the Alliance for a Strong America, a former U.S. State Department official and attorney.

Senator Mike Enzi (R)

U.S. Senator Mike Enzi will soon be entering his 20th year in the Senate. Enzi has had a long political career that began as Mayor of Gillette and included time in the Wyoming House and Senate. Enzi currently serves as the chairman of the Senate Budget Committee and is the former chair of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions committee among others.

Wyoming Youth Voter Summit

A Youth Voter Summit planned for Tuesday will be the first of its kind in Wyoming. The summit is being held in response to low voter turnout by young residents.

The summit will include voter registration, panel discussions and a number of speakers, including Governor Matt Mead and Olympic gold medalist Rulon Gardner.

Ryan Greene

Democrat Ryan Greene has an uphill battle. He is trying to become the first Democrat to serve Wyoming in Congress since the late Teno Roncalio left office in 1978. Greene needs to defeat the well funded Republican Liz Cheney. Greene says he’s not a liberal Democrat, more in line with former Governors Dave Freudenthal and Mike Sullivan. He joins me to discuss some issues, starting with energy.  

Stephanie Joyce / Wyoming Public Radio

You ever heard of a conference committee? Here in Washington, ‘conference committee’ is congressional speak for when senators and House members get together and try to work out the differences between their competing pieces of legislation.

Maggie Mullen

Wyoming’s economic downturn has decreased the amount of money the state gives to local governments at a time when many counties were already facing local revenue losses.

Johnson County Treasurer Carla Faircloth said her county's assessed valuation is down more than anywhere else in the state. Natrona County Sheriff Gus Holbrook said he has had to cut five positions and he predicts that may increase emergency response time.

Natrona County Coroner Connie Jacobson said like most agencies, her department is learning to do more with less.

Caroline Ballard

On a hot and sunny July day Julie McCallister readied herself for a day of campaigning at Saratoga Days, decked out in her “Elect Julie McCallister” polo.

McCallister was running for the Wyoming State House seat in House District 47.

In the art show at the Platte Valley Community Center, McCallister approached potential voters, chatting about everything from the art to why she is qualified to serve.

Bob Beck

Earlier this year the Wyoming legislature cut $36 million from money they provide to school districts. Since that time districts have been trying to get that money back and convince lawmakers that additional cuts would hurt their ability to adequately teach students.  

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Wyoming NORML and Wyoming Purple Cross, medical marijuana advocate groups in the state, are hosting a public meeting to discuss the Peggy A. Kelly Wyoming Cannabis Act. Right now, the groups are working to get enough signatures to put the issue on the 2017 ballot. This would allow voters to decide whether or not to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein gathered enough signatures to get her name on the November ballot in Wyoming, according to the Secretary of State's office. It is the first time a Green Party candidate has qualified for the ballot in Wyoming. 

Meanwhile, Evan McMullin, who is running as an anti-Trump independent, did not gather enough signatures to make it onto the ballot. Presidential candidates needed 3,302 signatures to qualify in this year’s election.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

  

Donald Trump is wooing energy-state voters by promising a presidency that will champion coal, promote drilling and free frackers from federal regulations limiting oil and gas development.

If the Republican candidate’s energy platform sounds like it was written specifically for fossil fuel companies, that’s because an Oklahoma oil billionaire helped craft it.

Donald Trump delivered his first major speech on U.S. energy policy at a petroleum conference in the capital city of one the country’s most oil-rich states, Bismark, North Dakota.

Caroline Ballard

  

Nearly 150 years ago, Wyoming was the first place in the country to grant women the right to vote. Congress didn't pass the 19th amendment, guaranteeing all American women the right to vote, until 1919, and it was ratified by states in 1920. Wyoming was ahead of its time, giving women the vote in 1869, but there are conflicting accounts as to why the state was a trailblazer.

Wyoming Legislative Service Office

Tuesday night long time Sheridan County State Representative Rosie Berger not only lost her bid for re-election, but also her chance to be the Speaker of the House. 

Berger was defeated in the Republican primary by Bo Biteman, who painted her as anti-gun and was critical of her support of the state capital renovation project. The loss was shocking to Cheyenne Representative Dan Zwonitzer.

Ryan Greene won the Democratic primary Tuesday night with 60 percent of the vote, defeating his challenger Charlie Hardy. Greene campaigned as a "Wyoming Democrat," splitting with the rest of his party on issues like second amendment rights and minimum wage increases.

“My dad’s a Republican, my mom’s a Democrat. I line right up in the middle," Greene said. "And I think that’s where the solutions lie. Not too far right, not too far left, but right there in the middle. Because I don’t think Wyoming’s problems are Republican or Democrat. I believe that they are Wyoming problems.”

Wyoming Secretary of State Ed Murray says voting has gone smoothly across the state during today’s primary election. 

Murray said Tuesday that early voting for the primary was actually about 500 votes more than two years ago when the governor and all the top elected officials were on the ballot. He added that the races for U.S. House and some interesting local races in Cheyenne, Casper, and Gillette has turned out voters in those areas. But interest has been much lower in counties with few contested races.

Wyoming PBS

        

Wyoming is facing a primary election on Tuesday amid a historic downturn in the state's energy industry. In recent weeks, candidates for a variety of offices, including those running for the U.S. House of Representatives, have weighed in on the current energy situation, and how they would fix it. Our energy reporter, Stephanie Joyce, joins us now to fact-check some of those claims.

Wyoming Democratic Party

The Wyoming Democratic Party is hoping that a new progressive caucus will bring in more grassroots voices and grow the party. The idea is to attract progressive Independents and current Democrats who would like to take a more active role with the party beyond the traditional structure. 

State Democratic Party Chair Ana Cupril said Bernie Sanders inspired lots of new voters to become interested in politics and many are not interested in traditional party politics. The hope is that the new caucus will get them interested.

When U.S. Representative Cynthia Lummis announced that she would not seek re-election this year, some big names in the state stepped forward, but so did a number of others, especially in the Republican Party. But their lack of cash and name recognition has made it difficult to get the same attention as two current office holders and another candidate with a famous last name. 

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