Ag Industry

The US Department of Agriculture has funded a grant for the University of Wyoming to study the business of beekeeping. The grant is just under $50,000 and will be used to study methods to maximize the economic impact of bee keeping in Wyoming.

Associate professor in agriculture and applied economics, Mariah Ehmke, was one of the researchers awarded the grant. She says that colony collapse disorder has contributed to declining honey bee numbers in the US, but that isn’t the only issue facing the beekeeping industry.

As the average male farmer or rancher gets older and retires, many women are taking over.  

To support women who are taking on the new management roles, the University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension is offering a series of classes under the Annie’s Project program.

Organizer Cole Ehmke says the class is meant to answer participants’ questions, and to help them establish connections with presenters and their peers, other women in agriculture.

Rebecca Martinez

Wyoming agriculture producers raise and lots of cows and sheep… but they’re mostly sold out of state, where they’re processed and sold as beef and lamb, making big money for outside businesses. Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez reports that state agriculture agencies are now encouraging ag producers of all kinds to add-value to the products they already have to keep their businesses competitive, and circulate the money in Wyoming.

REBECCA MARTINEZ: Bessie Zeller and her late husband Clarence took over his father’s Lovell beekeeping operation in the mid-1940s.