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The Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company is in Jackson this week, holding master classes and performing the new work “Analogy/Dora: Tramontane” this weekend.

The piece combines spoken word and modern dance and meditates on memory and duty. It’s based on the stories of Dora Amelan , a French-Jewish nurse who survived World War Two. Bill T. Jones, a two-time tony winner and former Macarthur Genius grant recipient, is the choreographer and artistic director. He joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard from Jackson.

Paul B. Goode / newyorklivearts.org

The Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company is in residence with the Dancer's Workshop at the Jackson Hole Center for the Arts this week, holding master classes and performing its new work “Analogy/Dora: Tramontane.”

Heather James Fine Art

A Jackson gallery is bringing museum-grade art to Wyoming. The Heather James Fine Art gallery in Jackson has a number of well-known pieces in its collection this summer, including pieces from Picasso and Warhol as well as Dalí and Matisse.

Gallery director Colleen Fitzgerald says art like this can be unexpected in small town Wyoming, as she learned two summers ago at a similar exhibition with pieces by Claude Monet.

“People would come in and just walk around a corner where they were and just stop in their tracks. They weren’t expecting at all to see that,” she says.

David Swift

The Jackson Hole community is invited to collaborate with artists on a new piece of public art. Materials are being gathered from different protected lands around Jackson to form a sculpture. Jackson Hole Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews says the project is called FoundSpace.

“The idea behind FoundSpace is really reaching out to people to connect to finding space, finding space via time, finding space out in nature, finding space in the open spaces. And really also, the treasures that we have that connect us to those spaces.”

Wyoming Theater Festival

Sheridan is hosting the first ever Wyoming Theater Festival. Talent from across the country has come to develop plays. Festival Director DannyLee Hodnett says the goal is to do for theatre that what Sundance Film Festival does for film.

“We’re trying to develop a theatre tourism economy. And for the audience, we just want to entertain them, give them a chance to see some great work and to be part of the creative process of what’s going to be on the stages in the big cities next season,” he says.

Flickr Image

Cheyenne is working to beautify its downtown. The Cheyenne Mural Project is modeled on the Laramie Mural Project. Work is set to start in August and be completed in October.

“We’re really excited and thrilled to be able to introduce more arts into our community, and create some long-term community investment in the downtown,” says Cheyenne DDA/Main Street director Amy Surdam.

The project aims to complete two murals this year, with many more in the future.

Sublette County Fair Art Show

The county fair in Big Piney is different than many county fairs—it has an art show. The fair’s Lynn Thomas Memorial art show is in its second year.

“There’s considerable art talent in Sublette County. And we needed a place to showcase that,” says Charmian McLellan, the art show coordinator.

Alongside local talent, the show attracts artists from as far as Michigan and Texas. An estimated 40 artists are at the art show.

Lander LIVE Website

A new free concert series starts this week in Lander. Lander LIVE kicks off Tuesday, July 21st, with a performance by Memphis-based country-rock band Lucero. The bands Donna the Buffalo, Pimps of Joytime, and Elephant Revival are each scheduled to play later this summer.

Unlike many concerts, Lander LIVE is always on a Tuesday night. 

pipelineartproject.com

Coal and gas from Wyoming’s mineral-rich land powers much of the nation. Now, the state even has a power switch—the same circle and line button seen on household electronics, tilled into a field in Sublette County. The 100 foot diameter Power Switch is the creation of three artists from the Pinedale area. It’s an example of land art, which uses elements of nature to harmonize with its location. And because it’s natural, it changes with the seasons.

Adrienne Adar, "Sonic Succulents, Living Interactive Sound Objects"
Art Association of Jackson Hole

An exhibit opening at the Art Association of Jackson Hole questions the role of technology in our lives. “Physico Electro: An Exhibition of DIY and Maker Art” features work by six artists from across the country. Two Brooklyn artists, Dave Sheinkopf and Daniel Kent, are also teaching a class about DIY art in conjunction with the exhibition. Sheinkopf says DIY—or Do It Yourself—art asks viewers to look at technology from a new angle.

givetake.squarespace.com

The Lander Art Center plans to host the first stop of a traveling art exhibition called “Give and Take.” The exhibition features the art of eleven women from Lander and Laramie. Artist Dannine Donaho says the artists all had one theme common in their work.

“The theme that we identified that we all had in common was nourishment. So we really liked sort of the reverse implication of the phrase give and take. You can take care of someone, which implies giving. Or you can give something up, which implies that something or someone has been taken away.”

Wyoming Arts Council

The Wyoming Arts Council will host public meetings around the state July 13 through July 17.

The council hosts these meetings every five years in order to work on long term plans for the arts in Wyoming.

Executive Director Michael Lange says the public meetings help make sure the Council’s plans reflect the interests of Wyoming’s people.

Governor Mead announced the state’s new official poet Thursday.  He gave the honor of poet laureate to Rose Hill of Sheridan, a local business owner and long-time writer.

Mead said Hill was chosen for the position because her poetry was “beautiful and eloquent and something I couldn’t do.”  At a ceremony, he signed an executive order naming Hill and afterward, she read a sample of her work. Hill is Wyoming’s seventh poet laureate.

artassociation.org

Downtown Jackson will be hosting a myriad of artists Friday, July 10 through Sunday, July 12. This year, Art Fair Jackson Hole is featuring 40 new artists alongside more than 100 returning artists.

Elise LaMay is Art Fair’s new events director. She says the fair showcases regional artists and artists from around the country. "I think we just have such a long history here in our community, both in terms of the art fair and in bringing art experiences to everyone here in Jackson," she says.

UW News Service

Bars are an important part of Wyoming culture and history. That message comes from author Julianne Couch as Wyoming celebrates its 125th anniversary of statehood. Couch and her co-author Ronald Hansen traveled across the state to research Wyoming bars for their book “Jukeboxes and Jackalopes: A Wyoming Bar Journey.”

Entertainment Weekly

Quentin Tarantino’s next film will have a touch of real Wyoming in it. Bounty hunter John “the Hangman” Ruth, played by Kurt Russell, will be wearing a buffalo hide coat created by tanning company Merlin’s Hide Out in Thermopolis. The coat is based on an original that can be seen in the Gene Autry Museum in Los Angeles.

“It's designed from the 1800s. It has different lengths of hair throughout—it needs to be a big, burly looking coat,” said Barb Heinze, co-owner of Merlin’s Hideout.

National Museum of Wildlife Art

Artists will gather to paint outdoors Saturday, June 20 at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson. The annual Plein Air Festival gives artists four hours to complete a painting while mingling with spectators.

This blending of artists and spectators creates an environment very different from the typical painting studio.

“I had this one little girl come up, and she was very curious, a really cute little girl, and she touched my paint with her fingers,” recalls artist Tammy Callens.

The Wyoming Humanities Council is currently gathering data to assess the state’s cultural resources. WHC Assistant Director Jason Burge says there is a need in Wyoming for studies addressing humanities organizations. He says the survey will look at what these organizations do and how their communities support them.

“They’re getting involved- they’re volunteering their time, their economic resources because they believe it’s important in their communities. And we’ve never actually looked at what that value was for the community,” says Burge.

Rebecca Golden

The Laramie Mural Project is asking the community to get involved. The next mural in the series is paint-by-number. Senior mural artist Meghan Meier says the design won’t come into focus until painting begins on Saturday, June 20th.

“That is top secret actually,” said Meier. “We haven’t set it up yet. I’ll start lining it out and filling in what number goes where…Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, I’ll be working on that.”

Ray Parrish

Here’s the story of how a museum nearly closed but instead reinvented itself with a brand new building and a major American Indian art collection. The new incarnation of the Brinton Museum in Big Horn opens to the public on Monday, June 15.

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

A new exhibit featuring the works of American painter John Mix Stanley will open at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody this weekend, thanks in part to a $40,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Peter Hassrick curated the exhibit. He says Stanley’s paintings of life in the American West in the 19th century are distinguished from his contemporaries.

"He approached it as fine art as opposed to documentation, as fine art as opposed to ethnographic studies," he says.

He also says a comprehensive presentation of Stanley’s work is long overdue.

Cynthia Stoffers

A new mural inspired by an Australian myth is now on display at the Laramie Community Recreation Center. The colorful 5 by 18 foot mural was created by about 70 kids in the Rec Center’s School Age Child Care program.

Laramie artist and educator Paul Taylor spent a week with the kids, singing and telling the ancient Australian aboriginal story of how Rainbow Snake created the rivers. “As Rainbow made the rivers, Rainbow then went off, and he went off into a billabong. And all the children rushed over to the billabong to see the beautiful rainbow colors disappear into the water…”

Four scientists and four artists walk into a bar. It sounds like the setup to a joke. And as Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer found out, the punch line is that scientists and artists actually can team up to create new and unexpected work.

This weekend and next, Laramie-based theater company Relative Theatrics is debuting seven new plays by Western playwrights. Earlier this year, director Anne Mason requested submissions, expecting to receive only a handful of applicants. Instead, she was sent over 20 scripts. Seven made the cut.

http://anneandpetesibley.com/

Wyoming Public Radio producer T.J. Snook talks with former Jackson residents Anne and Pete Sibley about their new album, Extraordinary Life.

The Shepard Symposium on Social Justice is underway at the University of Wyoming and will be featuring several spotlight events the rest of this week. Two of the events this weekend are photography sessions for The Self Evident Truths Project. iO Tillett Wright is the founder of and photographer for the project, as well as an LGBT activist. She’s attempting to photograph 10,000 people in all 50 states who identify as anything other than 100% straight in hopes of showing Americans the diverse makeup of the LGBT community.

Wyoming Festivals Summer 2015

Apr 6, 2015
Paul Montoya

Brace yourselves, Wyoming. Summer is here. Plan your music schedule now!

This festival season, take a photo of you (and your friends) at a Wyoming music festival, use the hashtag #wyofest and post it to Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. We'll collect all of the photos and feature them on our website!

Robert Earl Keen is one of Americana's biggest stars. His music career spans three decades, he has released 18 albums, and he even strummed and sang his way into the Texas Heritage Songwriters Hall of Fame. He'll be playing in the Town Square of Jackson Hole on Friday for the Jackson Hole Rendezvous Music Festival. Keen's love of music all started in bars in Houston. But as he told Wyoming Public Radio's Caroline Ballard, he wasn't there for the bands - he was there for foosball.

laramiepublicart.org

The city of Laramie has been awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to help create a public art plan. Last week, member organizations hosted the first community meetings to discuss the plan. Residents can also suggest projects and locations on this online survey.

This Saturday, February 28th, Trampled By Turtles will be playing at the Arts and Science auditorium on the University of Wyoming campus. The band has been one of the hottest bluegrass acts in the last decade. Their most recent album, "Wild Animals," was released last July. Mandolin player Erik Berry spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Ryan Oberhelman about "Wild Animals" and how the band and its sound has grown over the last decade.

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