beetle kill

News
5:14 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Pine Beetle Spread Slows Dramatically

The spread of mountain pine beetles is slowing in Wyoming, according to a survey from the U.S. Forest Service.

Beetles killed 180,000 new acres of trees in 2012, but only 82,000 acres in 2013.

The Forest Service’s Aaron Voos says it’s not surprising.

“They’ve kind of eaten themselves out of house and home,” Voos said. “All of the trees that were susceptible to attack … have been either eaten and are now dead and dying, or they were able to fend off the epidemic and have developed some sort of resiliency.”

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News
7:25 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Beetle-kill trees studied as potential fuel source

What if the vast stands of beetle-killed trees in the west could be turned into gasoline? A recently-announced federal project involving several University of Wyoming researchers is trying to answer that question.

Most biofuels are made of crops, like corn and sorghum, but this five-year, $10 million project will study whether dead trees might work just as well -- while avoiding competition with food sources.

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Open Spaces
4:36 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Reviving local saw mills could limit fire danger in the Rocky Mountain Region

Loggers from Saratoga Forest Management cut down Lodgepole and Ponderosa pine trees. The saw mill can use both live and beetle-killed trees to make two-by-fours.
Rebecca Martinez

Saw mills are re-opening in Wyoming and Colorado after a decade of being shuttered. They’re harvesting and processing trees that have been killed by beetle infestation.  Still, many are suitable for lumber.  Wyoming Public Radio’s Rebecca Martinez reports that this uptick in the timber business is helping with forest fire management.

(Firing up engine)

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Beetle Kill
1:08 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Despite reduced beetle kill, state forester forecasts a heavy fire season

Wyoming forest officials anticipate another heavy fire season for this year.

Wyoming State Forester Bill Crapser says recent warm winters have been great for the pine beetle population. He adds that Wyoming pine forests are full of densely-packed stands with trees of the same age, which makes them especially vulnerable to beetles, and that makes them more likely to burn.

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