behind the scenes

Paul Montoya

WPR receives all NPR programming via a satellite dish atop one of the buildings on the University of Wyoming campus.  As part of our membership with the Public Radio Satellite System (PRSS) dishes are replaced periodically at NPR stations.  This week the WPR dish was replaced.  We are now operating on the new dish.  We pay membership to PRSS on an annual basis.  Your membership with WPR radio helps enable us to receive this service and NPR programming.

Paul Montoya

The sun is shining and the phones are ringing! Our Spring Membership Drive must be underway. Here's a look at what goes on during the drive. Morning Music Hosts Grady Kirkpatrick and Micah Schweizer are hard at work cranking out the tunes and our phone volunteers are taking your pledges in our spring themed pledge room. 

WPM’s Shades of Ireland tour landed in Dublin on June 10th following an overnight flight from Denver. Our group included twelve Wyomingites, yours truly and my wife Cheryl, Rick Dowe, Jim and Carol Jacobs, Ron and Brenda Delaney all from Laramie, Rick and Sue Chambers from Cheyenne, Sue Ann Robertson from Casper along with her sister Grace Robertson from Wilson and Glen Mooney from Sheridan. 

Willow Belden

We’ve reported frequently on efforts to control wildlife numbers in Wyoming, through hunting, contraception, and other means. In southern Africa, wildlife managers face similar challenges, with elephants. In some parts of Africa, elephants are threatened by poaching, but in South Africa they’re flourishing. Some wildlife reserves say they’re multiplying too fast, but others say controlling their numbers is the wrong solution. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden traveled to South Africa and filed this report.