burbot

WYOMING GAME AND FISH DEPARTMENT

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department are using a new technology this year to track the movement of the non-native burbot fish in the Green River drainage.

PIT tags, or passive integrated transponder, are inserted into the fish’s belly which can be monitored by antennas to record when a fish moves upstream.

According to John Walrath, Green River fisheries biologist, burbot feed mostly on other fish, causing concern for native populations of the river such as smallmouth bass, bluehead, and flannelmouth suckers.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is studying invasive fish called burbot, to figure out what parts of the Green River they occupy at different times of year.

The department’s Darren Rhea says that could help them come up with ways to reduce the burbot population. He says burbot are problematic for the river’s ecosystem.

“They are almost exclusively a pisciverous fish, so they prey almost exclusively on other fish,” Rhea said.